Saturday, July 23, 2016

Vote for Hamid Malik USAID Lahore Regional-Secretary


23rd July,2016 daily global,regional and local rice e-newsletter by riceplus magazine



Vietnam warned it may yield to Myanmar in exporting rice
VietNamNet Bridge - Myanmar has jumped into large markets, getting ready to become the No 1 in the world in rice exports, according to Vo Tong Xuan, the leading rice expert. 
Professor Vo Tong Xuan (second right) in Nigeria

According to Xuan, Myanmar has great advantages in growing rice. Its land area is three times larger than Vietnam’s while the soil quality is better. The country has a large river network which ensures reasonable irrigation for rice fields. Meanwhile, the labor cost and the other input costs are lower, which allows products at competitive prices.

The big difference between Vietnam and Myanmar is that while Vietnamese farmers focus on growing high-yield rice varieties, Myanmar gathers strength on high-quality products despite the low yield.

Vietnamese farmers don’t want to grow high-quality but low-yield rice varieties like Thai, Myanmar and Cambodian farmers. They don’t like varieties with bring a low yield of 3 tons and allows harvest after 150 days. They prefer varieties which can bring 5-6 tons in yield and allow to harvest after 95 days.

Myanmar has bigger advantages than Vietnam in water sources: it is not affected by  hydropower dams in China and does not bear influences from the Thai’s river current diversion.
Vietnam has been advised to focus on high-quality rice varieties and position Vietnam as the exporter of high-quality rice.
Xuan said Myanmar is likely to become the No 1 in the world in rice export and it is likely to outstrip Thailand as well. Myanmar does not strive to export rice in large quantities, but aims to make high-quality products.

Sources said that Myanmar has been trying to expand rice export markets, especially the EU. It also targets Kuwait, the countries in the Middle East and Africa, while the next markets would be Australia, Ukraine, Bangladesh, South Africa, India, Singapore and Malaysia.

Since 2012, China has been the major export market for Vietnam which consumes 1/3 of the total export volume. However, with the emergence of Myanmar, the market share held by Vietnam, Pakistan and Thailand in the market has fallen.

Vietnam has been advised to focus on high-quality rice varieties and position Vietnam as the exporter of high-quality rice.

However, Vietnam’s rice export strategy remains unchanged. This, according to Xuan, is attributed to several reasons.

First, Vietnamese farmers insist on growing high-yield and short-term rice varieties, and they don’t care much about quality.

Second, Vietnamese rice exporters have been following the principle ‘every man for himself’.

In other countries, the quality of rice exports is controlled by the state, and substandard products cannot be exported.

Meanwhile, in Vietnam, the standards for rice exports set up by state management agencies are sometimes ignored.


http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/business/160459/vietnam-warned-it-may-yield-to-myanmar-in-exporting-rice.html


Monsoon surplus wiped out; southern trigger awaited

Vinson Kurian
Thiruvananthapuram, July 22:  
The monsoon has forfeited the surplus built up over the country as a whole thus far and is looking for a trigger to get going again from the South Peninsula.
Region-wise, the surplus is 2 per cent over North-West India, 1 per cent over the South Peninsula, and 11 per cent over Central India as of Friday. East and North-East India persisted with a deficit of -16 per cent.
Projections by the India Met Department suggest a fresh burst of rains may materialise from the South during this week (July 21 to 25) from the Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu coasts.
North-west dry
Madhya Pradesh, adjoining Gujarat, East Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, Punjab and Himachal Pradesh may witness a dry phase during the week, while normal rains are indicated for West Rajasthan.
Heavy to very heavy rains will continue to lash parts of Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and North-East India, the Met projections show. The last week of July (26 to 30) would see rains consolidate over Peninsular India, grow into west Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, east Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, and Punjab.
Below-normal rainfall is likely to occur during the next two weeks over Saurashtra, Kutch, Konkan, Goa and Coastal Karnataka, says an extended weather forecast brought out jointly by the Met, Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and the Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture.
Meanwhile, the Met said that normal to excess rains are expected in most parts of the country during the first 10 days of August, which is the second rainiest month of the four monsoon months.
Two-week forecast
The detailed outlook for the next two weeks from the India Met Dept, the ICAR and the Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture is as follows:
Normal or above normal rainfall likely over Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Punjab, Haryana, Delhi, East Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Sub-Himalayan West Bengal, Sikkim, Assam, Meghalaya, Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur, Mizoram, Tripura, Madhya Pradesh, South Interior Karnataka, Rayalaseema, Kerala and Tamil Nadu
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/monsoon-surplus-wiped-out-southern-trigger-awaited/article8887376.ece

 07/22/2016 Farm Bureau Market Report

Rice

High
Low
Long Grain Cash Bids
- - -
- - -
Long Grain New Crop
- - -
- - -


Futures:

ROUGH RICE


High
Low
Last
Change





Sep '16
1061.5
1037.0
1040.5
-20.5
Nov '16
1083.5
1065.0
1068.0
-20.0
Jan '17


1093.0
-20.0
Mar '17


1113.0
-20.5
May '17


1132.0
-20.5
Jul '17


1146.0
-20.5
Sep '17


1146.0
-20.5

Rice Comment
Rice futures gapped lower to end the week on a negative note. The market has come under renewed pressure from a disappointing export report. USDA says only 33,800 tons were sold to foreign buyers during the week ended July 14. Volume has been extremely light in recent weeks, and the disappointing report certainly didn't bring any buyers to the market. Technically, November now looks to be headed for a retest of support at $10.54.



Arkansas man named new chairman of USA Rice


Arkansas News Bureau
LITTLE ROCK — The board of directors of USA Rice, a national organization that advocates for the rice industry, said Thursday it has chosen an Arkansas rice merchant to be its new chairman.
During its annual meeting last week, the board voted to give the position to Brian King of Erwin Keith Inc. of Wynne. On Aug. 1 King will replace outgoing chairman Dow Brantley, an Arkansas rice farmer.
Brantley said in a statement, “Brian is going to make a great chairman. He is well versed in U.S. rice industry issues, having served on the board of the USA Rice Merchants’ Association and as current chair of the USA Rice Western Hemisphere Subcommittee.”
King said Dow will continue to serve on the Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee, which provides advice to the government on trade policy matters.
King was elected to a two-year term.
http://arkansasnews.com/news/arkansas/arkansas-man-named-new-chairman-usa-rice
















August 1st Deadline for ARC/PLC Enrollment  

WASHINGTON, DC -- The U.S. Department of Agriculture is reminding all farmers to enroll their farms in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs before the deadline of August 1 to be eligible for 2016 crop year payments.

Farmers should have already elected to participate in ARC or PLC but will have to annually sign an enrollment contract with their local USDA Farm Service Agency office to receive any program benefits for that year.  ARC and PLC serve as the primary farm safety net tools available for rice farmers replacing counter-cyclical payments following the passage of the 2014 Farm Bill.

Last year, USDA announced that 99 percent of long grain rice farms and 94 percent of medium grain farms elected to participate in the PLC program for the duration of this Farm Bill.

















Fortified Rice is a Game Changer for Food Aid 

WASHINGTON, DC -- Throughout the last year, the global food supply chain has faced unprecedented pressure from challenging weather conditions due to El NiƱo, the continued outpouring of refugees from Syria and the Middle East, and a steep decline in oil and commodity prices.  The demand for not just food, but proper nutrition, continues to grow exponentially.  The U.S. is responding to that demand with its agricultural bounty combined with new investment in nutritional science to combat global micronutrient deficiencies, a condition called hidden hunger.

The U.S. rice industry in particular has always played a lead role in feeding the world, providing hundreds of thousands of metric tons of rice to vulnerable populations.  Through a long term partnership with both the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), U.S. rice has fed millions around the world through school feeding, agricultural value chain development, and emergency relief programs.  The new addition of a fortified rice product to U.S. government feeding programs will feed more people around the world, but more importantly, will also help eradicate some of the most persistent micronutrient deficiencies that hold millions back from proper development and growth. 

Fortified rice is either a coated or extruded kernel that contains eight critical micronutrients, including Vitamin B, Vitamin A, and Iron.  The kernel is then blended back in with regular long grain rice in a way that provides optimal levels of nutrition.  Preliminary reports from U.S. Government field tests acknowledge the effectiveness of fortified rice:  it is accepted by those consuming it because it tastes and looks like regular rice, and it is absorbed in sufficient quantities to improve health and conquer hidden hunger.

"Work still remains to be done on the procurement and logistical side for this new product to gain traction in the food assistance supply chain," says Jamie Warshaw, USA Rice Food Aid Subcommittee chairman.  "We believe that fortified rice will increase the demand for U.S.-grown rice and will be a game changer - for rice growers and processors, for global feeding programs, and most importantly for the beneficiaries of the improved nutritional qualities of rice.  USA Rice is committed to this effort and is working closely with U.S. Government entities to ensure that fortified rice has the maximum impact on those in need."





APEDA AgriExchange Newsletter - Volume 1521

International Benchmark Price
Price on: 19-07-2016
Product
Benchmark Indicators Name
Price
Apricots
1
Turkish No. 2 whole pitted, CIF UK (USD/t)
4125
2
Turkish No. 4 whole pitted, CIF UK (USD/t)
3375
3
Turkish size 8, CIF UK (USD/t)
3125
Sultanas
1
Australian 5 Crown, CIF UK (USD/t)
2969
2
South African Orange River, CIF UK (USD/t)
2889
3
Turkish No 9 standard, FOB Izmir (USD/t)
1700
White Sugar
1
CZCE White Sugar Futures (USD/t)
879
2
Kenya Mumias white sugar, EXW (USD/t)
691
3
Pakistani refined sugar, EXW Akbari Mandi (USD/t)
639
Source: oryza, agra-net
Market Watch
Commodity-wise, Market-wise Daily Price on 21-07-2016
Domestic Prices
Unit Price : Rs per Qty
Product
Market Center
Variety
Min Price
Max Price
Rice
1
Aroor (Kerala)
Other
3100
3300
2
Dhing (Assam)
Fine
2800
3200
3
Sainthia (Maharashtra)
Common
1900
1960
Wheat
1
Dehgam (Gujarat)
Other
1785
1830
2
Neemuch (Madhya Pradesh)
Other
1700
2033
3
Kerala (Alappuzha)
Other
1800
1950
Papaya
1
Jagraon (Punjab)
Other
2100
2500
2
Kangra (Himachal Pradesh)
Other
2600
2800
3
Ganaur (Haryana)
Other
2000
2500
Onion
1
Kolar (Karnataka)
Other
1300
1800
2
Kollam (Kerala)
Other
1700
2000
3
Jalore (Rajasthan)
Other
800
1000
Floriculture
Unit Price : US$ per package
Price on 19-07-2016
Product
Market Center
Origin
Variety
Low
High
Rose Flower
Package: bunched 10s
1
Boston
Ecuador
Assorted Colors
8.50
10
Orchid Flower
Package: bunched 10s
1
Boston
Thailand
Dendrobium    
12.50
12.50
Lilies Flower
Package: per bunch
1
Boston
California
Asiatic  Type
13.50
13.50
Sunflower
Package: per stem
1
Boston
Canada
Large Head
2.00
2.00
Source:USDA

Rice Prices

as on : 22-07-2016 08:10:36 PM
Arrivals in tonnes;prices in Rs/quintal in domestic market.

Arrivals
Price

Current
%
change
Season
cumulative
Modal
Prev.
Modal
Prev.Yr
%change
Rice
Bangalore(Kar)
1768.00
-4.69
150177.00
4200
4200
-2.33
Bhivandi(Mah)
1650.00
-13.16
16409.00
3000
3000
57.89
Mumbai(Mah)
1555.00
-29.92
6652.00
3600
3500
-
Bangarpet(Kar)
403.00
14.49
11147.00
1880
1880
18.99
Kanpur(Grain)(UP)
350.00
75
11280.00
2190
2200
0.23
Memari(WB)
222.00
3.74
4646.00
2100
2100
13.51
Bazpur(Utr)
200.00
-60.78
46257.21
2175
2300
-0.82
Asansol(WB)
135.00
1.5
2902.50
2500
2500
8.70
Durgapur(WB)
133.00
0.76
1987.00
2500
2500
8.70
Jasvantnagar(UP)
120.00
-14.29
3110.00
2270
2265
-0.44
Haathras(UP)
120.00
-7.69
855.00
2300
3250
9.52
Bahraich(UP)
110.00
-3.51
4822.00
2195
2190
6.55
Mathabhanga(WB)
100.00
NC
5340.00
2350
2150
20.51
Basti(UP)
97.50
-20.73
5443.50
2040
2035
6.53
Faizabad(UP)
95.00
-32.14
4119.50
2240
2200
-
Rampurhat(WB)
85.00
-5.56
1174.00
2200
2120
-
Etawah(UP)
60.00
-14.29
19370.00
2265
2265
-0.44
Kasimbazar(WB)
50.00
-0.99
2188.50
2360
2360
2.61
Goalpara(ASM)
45.70
-
45.70
2200
-
NC
Shikohabad(UP)
45.00
462.5
560.50
1610
2140
-21.46
Indus(Bankura Sadar)(WB)
45.00
-25
732.00
2500
2500
13.64
Karimganj(ASM)
40.00
100
1820.00
2200
2150
-4.35
Ballia(UP)
40.00
-20
7580.00
2025
2020
1.76
Khatra(WB)
38.00
-2.56
1104.00
2200
2200
NC
Chintamani(Kar)
33.00
-5.71
565.00
1950
2000
5.41
Lanka(ASM)
30.00
NC
3015.00
1800
1800
1.41
Beldanga(WB)
30.00
-6.25
2451.00
2350
2350
2.17
Gazipur(UP)
28.00
-22.22
2469.50
2110
2100
6.30
Meerut(UP)
27.50
25
605.00
2420
2225
10.50
Bidar(Kar)
25.00
-10.71
97.00
2300
2400
NC
Amroha(UP)
25.00
38.89
69.00
2400
2375
15.94
Lohardaga(Jha)
22.50
9.76
1214.00
1700
1750
-10.53
Dhekiajuli(ASM)
22.00
37.5
1323.60
2000
2000
NC
Gulbarga(Kar)
22.00
4.76
107.00
2100
2100
2.44
Falakata(WB)
22.00
60.58
406.00
2110
2100
0.48
Diamond Harbour(South 24-pgs)(WB)
22.00
4.76
1149.50
2300
2200
6.98
Kolaghat(WB)
21.00
NC
839.00
2300
2300
4.55
Yusufpur(UP)
20.00
33.33
939.00
2040
2040
2.51
Tamluk (Medinipur E)(WB)
20.00
NC
858.00
2300
2300
9.52
Sirsa(UP)
18.00
24.14
584.50
2170
2165
2.84
Madhoganj(UP)
18.00
-12.2
330.00
2140
2160
-
Udala(Ori)
17.00
21.43
902.00
2800
2800
7.69
Robertsganj(UP)
15.00
-40
643.00
1940
1925
4.30
Bishnupur(Bankura)(WB)
15.00
-31.82
57.00
2200
2200
-
Ramkrishanpur(Howrah)(WB)
15.00
-5.06
1253.50
2400
2400
NC
Lakhimpur(UP)
13.00
44.44
573.50
2340
2340
8.84
Kolar(Kar)
12.00
-52
145.00
4570
4500
4.94
Bankura Sadar(WB)
12.00
9.09
170.00
2200
2200
-
Karvi(UP)
11.50
-32.35
174.00
2225
2190
9.61
Barikpur(Ori)
10.00
NC
215.00
2600
2700
4.00
Nilagiri(Ori)
10.00
-16.67
565.00
2400
2300
4.35
Pukhrayan(UP)
10.00
-9.09
278.50
2210
2210
NC
Dibrugarh(ASM)
9.00
36.36
1374.70
2450
2450
-
Kolhapur(Laxmipuri)(Mah)
9.00
NC
2000.00
3800
3800
-
Dahod(Guj)
8.80
238.46
1508.60
4100
4100
6.49
Khairagarh(UP)
8.00
-20
490.00
2170
2150
6.90
Mirzapur(UP)
8.00
6.67
1476.10
1970
1980
-0.25
Kannauj(UP)
7.50
7.14
387.50
2200
2250
0.46
North Lakhimpur(ASM)
6.70
-61.93
1689.70
1900
1900
-
Cherthalai(Ker)
6.00
-29.41
392.00
2150
2200
-15.69
Jhansi(UP)
6.00
20
172.00
2150
2100
10.26
Raiganj(WB)
6.00
NC
984.50
2600
2600
-1.89
Silapathar(ASM)
5.00
NC
672.80
3000
3000
NC
Rura(UP)
5.00
42.86
124.20
2150
2170
-3.80
Nimapara(Ori)
4.50
NC
245.00
1900
1900
NC
Belthangdi(Kar)
4.00
300
20.00
2800
3350
-
Buland Shahr(UP)
4.00
NC
455.50
2240
2250
10.07
Imphal(Man)
3.90
-2.5
210.00
3100
3100
NC
Firozabad(UP)
3.60
-10
693.60
2240
2210
11.44
Kalyani(WB)
3.50
-65
114.50
3400
3400
NC
Khalanpur(Mah)
3.00
NC
8.00
3800
3500
-
Aroor(Ker)
2.00
NC
190.70
7500
7300
-7.41
Siyana(UP)
2.00
-20
107.00
2150
2085
5.65
Bharuasumerpur(UP)
1.50
-40
9.50
1950
1880
8.33
Lamlong Bazaar(Man)
1.40
NC
75.30
3000
3000
3.45
Mawana(UP)
1.00
NC
29.20
2395
2280
10.88
Khatauli(UP)
1.00
-50
35.50
2220
2240
5.71
Sardhana(UP)
1.00
NC
91.30
2350
2350
10.33
Kasipur(WB)
0.90
-25
44.30
2400
2400
9.09
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/article8886706.ece