Wednesday, August 12, 2020

China flooding will not impact Philippine rice supply

 

China flooding will not impact Philippine rice supply

Louise Maureen Simeon (The Philippine Star

August 11, 2020 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines is safe from constraints in its rice supply even as China, the world’s second largest importer, may raise its purchases after it experienced the worst flooding in decades which damaged many of its farmlands.

Agriculture Secretary William Dar assured the public that the country’s rice inventory would be at a comfortable level this year until early-2021.

“By the end of the year, our outlook is good to last for three months and that will give us enough buffer and our local production is also continuous,” Dar told The STAR.

“This year, we are okay, even until the first half of next year,” he said.

China is currently experiencing its worst flooding in many decades, destroying thousands of acres of farmland near the Yangtze River and losing more than 50 percent of the country’s rice production.

Last year, China emerged as the world’s second largest rice importer, after the Philippines, with demand of about 2.5 million metric tons. Now, the worry lies on how much increase will China import to support its population.

This, according to industry analysts, could shake world market prices and may not be favorable for other importing countries like the Philippines.

The Federation of Free Farmers, however, echoed Dar’s optimism that the Philippines would not be at the losing end in the short term or at least this year.

“China has many grain reserves. What they are doing now is releasing those reserves. But since many were hit by the flood, at some point they would have to replenish and go to the international market if they won’t be able to recover their local supply,” FFF national manager Raul Montemayor told The STAR.

“But for the short term, the China flooding has no immediate impact. I think they are still assessing the situation, because if they had started to import, prices would have already shot up. Prices remain stable right now,” he said.

The government continues to rely on the private sector to continue bringing in rice with imports that already entered the country now at 1.7 million MT, already close to the two million MT target.

“Plus, we have directed the National Food Authority  to continue buying from our farmers to add to our buffer stock,” Dar said, adding that “hopefully, the private sector will also continue to buy this coming harvest season to ensure that our farmers will have good prices. “

Add to this is the P8.5 billion Rice Resiliency Project of the DA which is expected to yield an extra one million MT and improve the country’s self-sufficiency level to 93 percent.

https://www.philstar.com/business/2020/08/11/2034287/china-flooding-will-not-impact-philippine-rice-supply

12th August,2020 Daily Global Regional Local Rice E-Newsletter

 

Agriculture to shrivel, if Pakistan remains tech-shy’

LAHORE: Pakistan will have to take advantage of the modern technology to make the most of its agriculture sector, which equally requires its regulatory frameworks to catch up with these upgrades so they can be exploited efficiently.

It was stated by Dr Imran Ahmad Khan, CEO & Managing Director, Bayer Pakistan (Pvt) Limited, in an exclusive talk with The News.

Here are some of his thought-provoking insights on Pakistan’s healthcare and food security risks.

Q: Why is Bayer called a life science company?

A: At Bayer, we address some of the world's most pressing challenges. Our population is constantly growing, while climate change and resource scarcity pose a serious risk to food security. People need quality medicines and nutritious food in sufficient quantities to live a better life. Through our portfolio of science-based solutions for healthcare and agriculture, we work towards addressing these universal challenges and making our vision – Health for All, Hunger for None – a reality.

Q: What food and health security challenges are facing Pakistan currently?

A: There are tremendous challenges in both areas. Pakistan’s population, world’s sixth-largest, is projected to expand by nearly 100 million people by 2050 (UN World Population Prospects 2019). We need to feed more people than ever before in our history; even before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, an estimated 21 million Pakistanis were facing acute food insecurity. But simultaneously, we are facing extreme climate change-related challenges, scarcity of resources including water, and productivity losses. These factors affect the productivity of major crops such as wheat, rice and maize.

The young population of Pakistan is growing exponentially, and needs more in terms of both adequate nutrition and healthcare. Food insecurity puts people at great risk of malnutrition, which can lead to lifelong health conditions.

Q: What does Bayer offer to counter the prevailing challenges in healthcare and food security?

A: Bayer’s portfolio is uniquely structured to offer solutions for both healthcare and nutrition. In healthcare, we provide high-quality pharmaceuticals for many therapeutic categories – in Pakistan these include cardiology/thrombosis, women’s healthcare, pulmonology, oncology, anti-infectives, ophthalmology, and radiology. We also have a Consumer Health portfolio that includes nutritional, dermatology, and digestive health products. For the agriculture sector, our Crop Science product portfolio focuses on high-yielding seeds for maize as well as a portfolio of vegetable seeds. We also offer innovative crop protection solutions, including herbicides, fungicides, pesticides, and micronutrient products.

Q: What is the role of research-based drugs in healthcare security?

A: The field of medicine is constantly advancing; as diseases continue to evolve, so must available treatments. Research-based drugs offer patients the newest and most effective therapies to combat existing conditions. They are vital to raising the bar on prevailing standards of treatment, and therefore very important to healthcare security overall.

Q: How can Pakistan leverage agritech to combat food security challenges?

A: Agritech can be leveraged to combat many of the growing challenges to food security and improve the sustainability of the agriculture industry. Farmers can better utilize limited amounts of arable land and grow more with less by planting high-yielding crops made possible through advanced breeding techniques. A good example of this is short stature corn, a variety of corn that is resilient to challenging weather conditions, and also allows for greater planting density. If enabled by policy and regulatory frameworks, farmers can also utilise digital insights and precision agriculture for improved agronomy and efficient water usage. For example, harvest losses can be decreased if farmers have access to information about rapidly changing climate conditions, and are empowered to make timely decisions to protect their crops.

Q: How does Pakistan’s regulatory structure affect introduction of research based, innovative products, and technologies?

A: For innovation to flourish, the prevailing regulatory framework needs to provide adequate protection and support, particularly in the area of intellectual property (IP) protection. This is equally applicable to the pharmaceutical and agriculture sectors.

Technological advancement is underpinned by years of scientific research and investment. Therefore, companies seek out markets that provide adequate protection against theft of their proprietary knowledge. However, in Pakistan, despite the existence of requisite laws against intellectual property infringement, enforcement remains weak.

In agriculture, this is evident in the fact that despite being the fourth-largest market for cottonseed, none of the leading cottonseed technology (Bt cotton) providers are willing to enter the market. In the pharmaceutical sector, intellectual property violations have resulted in the widespread production, and distribution of counterfeit and sub-standard drugs.

Q: In terms of regulatory environment, what other improvements can contribute to create a competitive and growing pharmaceutical industry?

A: Contract manufacturing could enable the transfer of technology, expand the local industry, and boost exports. However we need more supportive policies for this to happen. Currently, to fulfill the requirements for contract manufacturing, companies must have a functional manufacturing facility of their own (unlike other countries, such as India). This requirement means that Pakistan will lag in pharmaceutical exports, with local plants remaining underutilised. There are concerns that contract manufacturing would discourage MNCs (multinational companies) from operating in Pakistan. However, the reality is that, due to the strict quality standards of MNCs, contract manufacturing would promote technology transfer by bringing the local industry at par with global technology, processes and quality controls. There is an urgent need to revisit the laws and regulations pertaining to contract manufacturing in order to unlock the potential of the pharmaceutical industry.

Q: What has the impact of COVID on healthcare and agriculture been?

A: As with all industries, the impact of COVID on both has been significant. The government-mandated lockdown at the peak of the pandemic along with travel restrictions, both local and global, put pressure on supply chains. In the agriculture supply chain, the movement of key inputs such as seed, fertilisers and crop protection products was impacted. Similarly, restrictions on movement of people also created a shortage of labour at critical planting and harvest stages across the country. However, the federal and provincial governments were quick to issue necessary exemptions for the relief of farmers. But, with the pandemic drawing out longer, demand compression experienced by certain food commodities is now beginning to drive down agriculture commodity prices; essentially eroding farmer profitability.

In the pharmaceutical industry, similar disruption was faced by many in the procurement of key raw materials such as API (Active Product Ingredient) which is not manufactured in the country and must be imported, often from India or China. Local movement restrictions also affected supply to distributors and retailers.

Q: What agri technologies does Bayer plan to introduce into Pakistan and where does the country stand in terms of adoption of modern technology?

A: Globally, Bayer has multiple technology platforms that provide tailored solutions to farmers, including advanced breeding technology, biotechnology, crop protection chemistries and digital/precision farming tools. In Pakistan, Bayer is already marketing elite maize hybrid seed genetics, and a crop protection portfolio enabling improved pest and weed control. Regarding our pipeline, we have completed all field trial and regulatory requirements for our biotech maize hybrids, which allow protection against insect attack and improved weed control. These hybrids have been shown to exhibit 10–45 percent higher yields than conventional varieties, and could save farmers up to 70 percent on crop protection costs. Bayer has also partnered with XAG, a leading drone manufacturer, in efforts towards introducing agriculture drone technology in the country. Drones allow more precise, efficient and safe application of pesticides, enable direct seeding in select crops and provide valuable data insights to aid key farming decisions. Unfortunately, Pakistan has been unable to fully capitalise on the modern technologies that are fueling growth in agriculture productivity globally. Drone technology is a prime example; while the world is fast embracing this innovative tool, our local regulatory frameworks have not evolved sufficiently to utilise it. In order to realise our true potential in agriculture, we need to embrace and adopt a wide array of modern technologies available to farmers around the world.

https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/699286-agriculture-to-shrivel-if-pakistan-remains-tech-shy

 

 

 

Egypt keen to enhance tie with Pakistan Diplomat

 

 

 

 

ISLAMABAD: Egyptian Ambassador to Pakistan Tarek Mohamed Hussein Dahroug on Tuesday said that Egypt is keen to further enhance bilateral trade relations with Pakistan.

Description: https://profit.pakistantoday.com.pk/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/cropped-pak-egypt.jpg

The Egyptian ambassador while addressing the business community during his visit to Islamabad Chamber of Commerce & Industry (ICCI) said that both countries have good potential to export many high quality products to each other at competitive prices.

He said that by enhancing trade cooperation with Egypt, Pakistan can get easy access to many African markets including Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Algeria.

He said that Pakistan and Egypt should focus on exporting competitively priced products to each other.

The Egytian ambassador said that a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) had been signed in the past for the establishment of Pakistan-Egypt Business Council, however, no progress has been made so far. He urged both countries to make target oriented efforts to achieve a mutually beneficial outcome for the project.

Speaking at the occasion, ICCI President Muhammad Ahmed Waheed said that Pakistan and Egypt enjoy historically cordial and friendly relations which should be translated into better trade and economic relations.

He said that bilateral trade between Pakistan and Egypt in 2017 stood at $154 million, which was less given the market size of both countries urging that both sides should focus on developing strong linkages between their private sectors in order to explore all untapped areas of trade promotion.

He added that Pakistan and Egypt should consider signing a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) which would remove hurdles and boost trade between the two countries.

Ahmed Waheed said that Pakistan can export many products to Egypt including rice, marble, engineering goods, agro-processed products, surgical instruments, pharmaceuticals and sports goods.

He said that both countries can potentially cooperate in areas including agricultural products, engineering goods, construction and building material, tourism, shipping, fertilisers, chemicals, textiles products, leather goods, medical and surgical items and pharmaceuticals.

He further said that many Pakistani products are entering the Egyptian market with third country labels and urged that the Pakistani government should cooperate with its private sector to promote local Pakistani brands in Egypt in order to realise better results.

https://profit.pakistantoday.com.pk/2020/08/11/egypt-keen-to-enhance-tie-with-pakistan-diplomat/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crop targets: scratching beneath surface

 

BR Research 12 Aug 2020

 

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Since mid-2000s, Pakistan's major crops segment has underperformed other segments of the economy, including other agricultural heavyweights such as livestock. Consisting of wheat, cotton, rice, maize and sugarcane, major crops have particularly struggled during the last 5 years, when segment growth has often drifted in the red, averaging close to negative two percent.

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Does that mean all crops are suffering? Not quite. Since the last GDP rebasing exercise in FY06, four out of five major crops have witnessed growth in output (volume). Of these, maize, sugarcane, and rice have posted decent CAGR of 6.22, 2.93, and 2.09 percent, although wheat output has increased at a muted rate of 1.14 percent. Why then is the cropped segment said to be underperforming?

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Two reasons. First is the sectoral GDP composition. Back in 2006, wheat and cotton together constituted the lion’s share within major crops, at over 70 percent of major crops index. Because the two crops have witnessed stunted (or in cotton’s case, negative) growth during the intervening years, this has often painted a picture of a segment in recession. Meanwhile, even as output of crops such as maize, cane, and rice has increased significantly during the period, these have failed to translate into commensurate GDP growth due to constant factor costs set at base year prices of FY06.

But an even greater reason why cropping segment is seen to be underperforming are the missed output targets set at the beginning of every season by Federal Committee on Agriculture. Here, the disappointment is multifold. Although the FCA sets higher output targets for each major crop every year - cotton being a conspicuous exception – the increase in target output is invariably driven by an increase in targeted area, instead of an increase in yield, latter being the universal indicator of farming productivity.

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Between FY16 – FY20, targeted increase in yield averaged at a paltry 0.84 percent per annum for the five major crops. But here is a much more distressing bit: even those negligible increases in targeted yields are routinely missed. The underwhelming performance of productivity is exacerbated by the fact that target yields for cotton and wheat – with their current two-thirds weights in major crop index - have been missed in almost all years. Also consider that during the past five years, cotton missed its targeted yield by over 15 percent on average!

Meanwhile, output of crops such as maize, rice, and sugarcane has been slowly catching up. Apart from few exceptional seasons of water shortfall or depressed demand, the three crops have outperformed targeted output substantially. But is that enough cause for celebration?

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It is important to remember the context. Underwhelming increases in yield means that the above par performance is a symptom of mediocre yield targets, especially when acreage achieved is also above target level. For example, during the five-year period under review, rice yield has increased at an annual average growth rate of just 0.16 percent. Similarly, while yields of both sugarcane and maize have made some strides, the rate of increase for each crop is nevertheless stuck below 3.5 percent per annum.

To most readers, Pakistan’s crop productivity challenge should come as no surprise. But it is important to scratch beneath the surface, which reveals that not all crops are created equal. Over the past decade, Pakistan’s two most important crops – wheat and cotton – have underperformed even mediocre target outputs, as yield levels have been on a decline. And while the rest may have arguably witnessed decent increase in output, it has mostly been driven by an increase in acreage rather than productivity.

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With gated communities and housing schemes knocking at the doors of Bahawalpur and Rahim Yar Khan – the fertile crescent of Indus – the policy planners at MNFS&R must ask themselves: how long before Pakistan’s farmers run out of land to cultivate?

 

India’s exports of non-basmati rice in first two months of FY21 jumps 52.5%

 

By

Sutanuka Ghosal, ET BureauLast Updated: Aug 11, 2020, 05:33 PM IST

Synopsis

 

Bangladesh too, will open up opportunities for Indian non-basmati rice exports. “Either they will directly buy from private players or they will buy through government-to-government scheme. Whichever way it happens, it will provide a fillip to the country’s rice exports,” Rao added.

ReutersBangladesh has imposed an import duty of 55% on rice.

Confirmed

20,284,882

Deaths

741,126

KOLKATA: India’s exports of non-basmati rice in the first two months of FY21 has jumped 52.5% to 11.13 lakh tonnes from 7.3 lakh tonnes in the same period of FY20.

Africa has emerged as the major buyer of non-basmati rice and exporters are hoping volumes will increase further when Bangladesh starts importing this variety.

“Africa is depending on India for rice supply this year as Thai rice prices have skyrocketed. Non-basmati rice will do well this year,” said BV Krishna Rao, president, All India Rice Exporters Association.

Rao is optimistic Indian non-basmati rice exports will touch FY18 levels when the country exported 8.64 million tonnes. “Exports of non-basmati rice subsequently went down in the next two years and in FY20 we had achieved exports of 5.04 million tonnes. This drop in non-basmati rice was because the government increased the minimum support price of paddy and farmers were not interested in exports. Also, the government had procured huge quantities of rice. That is why the exports went down,” added Rao.

Bangladesh too, will open up opportunities for Indian non-basmati rice exports. “Either they will directly buy from private players or they will buy through government-to-government scheme. Whichever way it happens, it will provide a fillip to the country’s rice exports,” Rao added.

Traders said rice millers in Bangladesh were demanding high prices for rice that they would provide to the government warehouses.


“Rice consumption has increased in Bangladesh as people are staying indoors due to the coronavirus outbreak. Eating out has stopped. This is increasing the demand for rice in the country” said Suraj Agarwal, CEO, Tirupati Agri Trade.

Agarwal said a decision from the Bangladesh government on import of rice from India is expected by the end of this week or early next week.

Bangladesh has imposed an import duty of 55% on rice, but traders said the government is likely to bring down import duty on rice to 18%.

Bangladesh food ministry is considering importing of rice amid sluggish progress in the procurement of rice and paddy due to a lack of interest among millers and farmers to supply the cereal to public warehouses.

International media reports said that until now, Bangladesh government's food office could meet 20% of its paddy procurement target of 8 lakh tonnes and 45% of its rice procurement target of 11.5 lakh tonnes. And if it progresses this way, then the target of paddy procurement is unlikely to be achieved within the deadline of 31 August.

 

 

 

India defers certificate requirement for rice export to European countries to Jan 1, 2021

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India defers certificate requirement for rice export to European countries to Jan 1, 2021

By Kirtika Suneja

, ET BureauLast Updated: Aug 11, 2020, 08:27 PM IST

EIC is the official export certification body of India which ensures quality and safety of products exported from India.

AFP

New Delhi: India on Tuesday deferred the requirement of a certificate of inspection by export inspection agencies for exporting rice to European countries to January 1, 2021.

The Directorate General of Foreign Trade (DGFT) amended the export policy and said that the export of Rice (Basmati and Non-Basmati) to EU member states and other European Countries namely Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland only will require Certificate of Inspection from Export Inspection Council (EIC) or Export Inspection Agency (EIA).

EIC is the official export certification body of India which ensures quality and safety of products exported from India.

“Export to remaining European countries (except Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland) will require Certificate of Inspection by Export Inspection Council / Export Inspection Agency for export from January 1, 2021,” DGFT said in the notification.

It had, in January, said that a certificate of inspection by export inspection agencies will be mandatory for exports to remaining European countries with effect from July 1, 2020.

India’s rice export to Europe were $278.68 million in FY20, 13.7% lower than the $323.09 million in FY19.

Cebu Customs intercepts smuggled bags of rice from Taiwan

Published August 12, 2020, 12:00 PM

by Betheena Kae Unite

Close to 500 bags of rice worth more than half a million pesos from Taiwan were recently intercepted at the Port of Cebu.

The Bureau of Customs said instead of the declared items, the shipment was found to contain a total of 495 bags of Myanmar White Rice on Monday, August 10.

It has an estimated market value of P525,857, the Port of Cebu said.

The bags of rice were intercepted following an intelligence report on July 23 that a shipment loaded with imported rice will arrive at the Port of Cebu from Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Investigation showed that the shipment’s inward foreign manifest declared it to contain personal effects. It was also not covered by any Sanitary and Phytosanitary Clearance from the Bureau of Plant Industry.

According to the bureau, it was consigned to a certain Theresa Lawas, of Barangay Pansoy, Municipality of Sogod in Cebu. However, verification with Barangay Pansoy confirmed that it had no resident named Theresa Lawas.

With this, Acting District Collector Mendoza reminded importers to properly declare their goods, and to properly identify themselves in shipping documents and encouraged the public to report to the bureau any information on illegal shipments that are attempted to be brought into the country.

“Report what you know, even anonymously, so we can verify, investigate and seize smuggled goods. This way, you are helping the government in our anti-smuggling campaign and bolster economic recovery during this pandemic,” Mendoza urged.

A week after receiving the confidential report, a pre-lodgement control order was issued against the shipment.

A 100-percent physical examination was then conducted by a Customs examiner in the presence of representatives from the Enforcement and Security Service, X-ray Inspection Project, Customs Intelligence and Investigation Service, Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency, Philippine Coast Guard and Chamber of Customs Brokers, Inc.-Cebu Chapter.

A warrant of seizure and detention was already issied against the shipment for violation of Section 1113(f) and (l) par. 5of the Customs Modernization and Tariff Act.

https://mb.com.ph/2020/08/12/cebu-customs-intercepts-smuggled-bags-of-rice-from-taiwan/

 

 

ADB approves $400-M loan for agri reforms

 

August 12, 2020, 4:21 PM

by Chino S. Leyco

 

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) approved a loan to the Philippines aimed at raising productivity and competitiveness of the farm sector and significantly reducing poverty in rural areas.

In a statement, the Manila-based lender said yesterday that it has approved a $400 million policy-based loan under the Competitive and Inclusive Agriculture Development Program (Subprogram 1) to support reforms in the agriculture industry.


ADB said the loan aims to help the government expand economic opportunities in the farm sector by implementing trade policy and regulatory reforms, enhancing public services and finance to the sector, and expanding social protection to rural families.
 

Ahmed M. Saeed, ADB vice-president said the Philippines made tremendous strides in reducing the national poverty rate, but rural poverty remains high due to low productivity and limited crop diversification.

“This loan will support the government’s comprehensive suite of policy and regulatory reforms, resolving institutional weaknesses in land and water management,” the ADB official said.

Saeed also said the loan should expand agricultural financing to boost productivity, and extend the social safety net to unserved and underserved rural families.

The agriculture industry employs a quarter of the country’s labor force. But the sector lags behind counterparts in other Southeast Asian countries in productivity growth and competitiveness.

The government has identified agriculture as a priority area for reform under its coronavirus disease pandemic economic recovery program, as it seeks to ensure food security and reduce poverty in the country.
 

Among the government reforms under the Competitive and Inclusive Agriculture Development Program, Subprogram 1, is the passage of the 2019 Rice Tariffication Act and the various measures it provides. 

The new law removed quantitative restrictions on rice imports and replaced them with a pure tariff system.

Using collected duties on imported rice, the government set up the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund to strengthen the rice industry in line with the Philippine Rice Industry Roadmap.

The government is also initiating additional reforms in land and water resources, including irrigation investments.
 

Other reforms supported by the loan include additional assistance to farmers making the transition towards higher value crops and those affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

These include unconditional cash grants and the Expanded Survival and Recovery Assistance Program for Rice Farmers to provide zero-interest loans to more than 160,000 small farmers.

The program also expands the government’s pre-school feeding programs to families to reduce malnutrition and stunting.

The new loan will be complemented by upcoming investments to enhance flood risk management in major river basins, improve irrigation efficiency, and promote agro-enterprise development.

https://mb.com.ph/2020/08/12/adb-approves-400-m-loan-for-agri-reforms/

 

Why Consumer Price Index rose by 11.5 per cent

Description: Emmanuel Ntirenganya

Emmanuel Ntirenganya

 

Description: https://www.newtimes.co.rw/sites/default/files/styles/mystyle/public/main/articles/2020/08/11/1489608477market_1.jpg

The Consumer Price Index in Rwanda increased by 11.5 per cent between July 2019 and July 2020, according to latest figures from the National Institute of Statistics of Rwanda (NISR) on August 10, 2020.

This, according to NISR, means that for an item which was costing Rwf500 in July 2019, the price rose to Rwf557.5 in July 2020.

The statistics are contained in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) JULY 2020 released by NISR.

CPI is a measure of the average change in prices, over time, of goods and services purchased by households, such as food and transportation.

According to the figures, Urban CPI increased by 9.2 percent in July 2020 compared to the same month of 2019, while Rural CPI increased by 13.2 percent on annual basis and increased by 1.6 percent on monthly basis.

The annual average inflation rate between July 2020 and July 2019 was 7 percent.

In urban arears, prices for food and non-alcoholic beverages increased by 11.9 percent; while alcoholic beverages, tobacco and narcotics increased by 25.1 percent in July 2020 compared to July 2019.

Housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels’ increased by 4.3 percent and transport increased by 22.6 percent.

On an annual basis, the local goods index increased by 10.1 percent, the imported goods index grew by 6.3 percent, while the fresh products index increased by 19.6 percent. Fresh products are food products which have seasonal fluctuations. The energy index increased by 5 percent.

Prices of some food items have gone up significantly. This is the case for beans which went up from Rwf450 a kilogramme in 2019 to Rwf650 a kilogramme in parts of the country such as Burera District in Northern Province even during bean harvest season (in July 2020).

At Kimironko Market in Gasabo District, the price of mangoes more than doubled from Rwf1,000  to Rwf2,500 a kilogramme, according to fruit dealers.

Still at the same market, mandarin (citrus fruit), a kilogramme saw its cost jump from Rwf1,500 to Rwf2,500, a more than half rise.

Factors that drove up such price include the shortage of supply compounded with disrupted trade with Burundi which constrained import of such fruits into Rwanda, according to information from the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB).  

Dr Canisius Bihira, a socio-economist told The New Times that inflation and insufficient domestic food production are to blame for the rising prices that push up the cost of living.

“Agricultures is still lacking in technologies, which affects farm productivity and the production of food, hence leaving a gap to be filled by imports,” he said citing sugar and rice imports.

“The country should do its best to increase agricultural production among others, so that prices go down. It should also protect its currency in order to protect its purchasing power from decline,” he said indicating that the Rwandan franc has depreciated almost by half against the dollar in less than a decade.

Some causes of CPI increase

NISR explains that there was a low production for commodities such as bean in the first agriculture season (Season A) of 2020 due to heavy rain, and flooding of some marshlands for rice plantations.

This situation, it said, caused the shortage of such commodity on the market as shown by the increase of 17 percent in prices of food and non-alcoholic beverages.

In the transport sector, NISR indicated that in the framework of stopping the spread of Covid-19, the number of passengers in buses was reduced.

The statistics institute said that for the sustainability of this important service, the bus transport fare was increased and resulted in the overall rise of 22.6 percent in transport tariffs.

On the implications of such CPI increase, NISR says that in the short term, this is the normal behaviour of the price trend when there are shocks like those that are highlighted above, adding that when shock disappears prices tend to become normal.

However, the institute says that if an upward trend in prices continues in the long term, it means the purchasing power of household keeps reducing.

entirenganya@newtimesrwanda.com

https://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/why-consumer-price-index-rose-115-cent

 

 

Rice farmers disappointed RCEF failed to lower costs

 

August 11, 2020, 6:00 PM

by Madelaine B. Miraflor

 

While the country’s palay output went up during the second quarter of this year, rice farmers are disappointed that the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund (RCEF) – the tariff collected from rice imports and is supposed to help lower the production cost of Filipino rice farmers – did not necessarily help the production of the main staple grow in the last months.

Jaime Tadeo, representative of PARAGOs Pilipinas, said in a statement that there was high expectations for palay output to rebound and improve significantly with the implementation of RCEF, which is one of the crucial components of Rice Tariffication Law (RTL).

To recall, RTL, which allowed the unimpeded entry of cheaper imported rice into the country starting March last year, required the government to provide free seeds and mechanization to rice farmers using RCEF in order to bring down their production cost and in turn be able to compete with rice imports.

RCEF is supposed to be injected with P10 billion annually from 2019 to 2024.

Tadeo noted that after recovering from El Niño, rice production is really expected to recover from 2019 levels and with RCEF, the increase should be significantly higher.

“Where is the impact of all the investments not just on RCEF for 2019 but also of significant budgets for irrigation over the last 4 years,” Tadeo said.

The country’s palay harvests from April to June, according to Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA), reached 4.125 million metric tons (MT), representing a 7 percent increase over the output during the same period in 2019.

This means that the Philippines’ rice output for the first half of the year was slightly higher at 8.386 million MT compared to the same period in 2019.

But compared to production levels of 8.5 million MT and 8.71 million MT in 2017 and 2018, which didn’t have RCEF support yet, the country’s rice output actually went down.  

Aside from RCEF funds, the government has also allocated during the first quarter of this year as much

as P8.5 billion in additional funds for fertilizers and additional seed subsidies under the Department of Agriculture’s (DA) Rice Resiliency Program.

Trinidad Domingo, representative of Pambansang Katipunan ng mga Samahan sa Kanayunan (PKSK), said the lackluster performance of palay can actually be attributed to the impact of RTL.

“Many farmers were disheartened by the low palay buying in 2019 due to the import surge as a result of the Rice Tariffication Law,” Domingo said.

Domingo’s statement was in line with the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) earlier forecast that the Philippines will continue to be the world’s top rice importer over the next two years because Filipino rice farmers already began abandoning their rice farms for other jobs due to low prices amid influx of imported rice.  

Meanwhile, the Federation of Free Farmers (FFF) is now urging the DA to address deficiencies in its support delivery system for rice farmers.  

FFF said it has received reports of delayed deliveries of seeds, substandard seeds with low germination rates, and the provision of seed varieties which farmers do not like.  

According to the group, some local government units (LGUs) have allegedly been charging farmers for delivery and facilitation fees for the free seeds, while some individuals reportedly got multiple rations of subsidized seeds by asking their spouses and children to make separate applications or registering more than one farm plot under the program.

 

https://mb.com.ph/2020/08/11/rice-farmers-disappointed-rcef-failed-to-lower-costs/

 

 

 

Only 40% of rice import applications brought in

 

ByJasper Y. Arcalas

August 12, 2020

 

Description: https://businessmirror.com.ph/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/rice-unload-nonoy-696x430.jpg File photo: Workers unload tons of rice to be distributed to Quezon City barangays affected by the COVID-19 lockdown. (NONOY LACZA)


PRIVATE rice traders and importers have yet to import 2 million metric tons of rice (MMT) as they have only brought in about 40 percent of their total applied and approved volume this year, latest Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) data showed.

Latest BPI data showed that rice importers have brought in 1.457 MMT out of the 3.478 MMT they applied from January to July.

This means that at least 2.020 MMT of rice are still expected to arrive this year, BPI data indicated.

Furthermore, BPI data showed that only 61,175 MT of rice entered in July, the lowest import arrival on a monthly basis this year.

The imported volume last month was not even close to half of the 216,798.322 MT volume that rice importers applied in July, according to BPI data.

Latest BPI data showed that rice importers only used 1,970 sanitary and phytosanitary import clearances out of the total approved 4,225 SPS-IC by end-July.

The BPI earlier told the BusinessMirror that “unjustified” underutilization by traders of their approved SPS-IC for milled rice is an “anomalous” activity that may disrupt state food sufficiency planning.

The BusinessMirror earlier reported that rice traders and importers who have unused sanitary and phytosanitary import clearance could be suspended by the DA as about 60 percent of issued SPS-ICs in the first half, covering almost 2 MMT, remained unutilized as of July 10.

The BPI, an attached agency of the Department of Agriculture (DA), said the underutilization of the SPS-ICs this year was attributed to such reasons as the lockdowns in countries of origin due to Covid-19 pandemic and export ban in Vietnam.

Other reasons given by rice importers were: delayed shipments, rice suppliers limiting their export to ensure supply for their own needs, port congestion and holidays at country of origins and high price of imported rice than locally produced staple, according to BPI-NPQSD.

“Underutilization of approved SPS-ICs without proper justification is a kind of anomalous activity which can disrupt government planning for food sufficiency,” BPI National Plant Quarantine Services Division (NPQSD) said in an e-mail interview.

BPI-NPQSD said the new requirements for securing SPS-IC would “avoid undersupply for consumption of the Filipinos and buffer stocking purposes.”

“The new requirements will assure that applied SPS-ICs will be arriving within the specified period, and together with the local harvest, avoid undersupply for consumption of the Filipinos and buffer stocking purposes,” it added.

The DA’s latest memorandum order required rice importers to submit additional requirements for the application of SPS-IC: 1) payment of certification of the consignment and 2) list of distribution points/warehouse of the said consignment.

https://businessmirror.com.ph/2020/08/12/only-40-of-rice-import-applications-brought-in/

 

Punjab and Madhya Pradesh in Political War Over GI Tag of Basmati Rice

August 11, 2020

Gurneel Kaur

Punjab CM asks PM Modi to maintain the status quo on GI tagging for basmati amid the concerns over giving an advantage to Pakistan. Punjab and Madhya Pradesh in the political war over GI tag of basmati rice.

Capt. Amarinder Singh Writes to PM Modi

Punjab’s chief minister has expressed his concerns over providing GI tag to basmati rice of Madhya Pradesh. He said that GI tagging of basmati would adversely affect the state’s agriculture and India’s basmati exports. Further, he added that Madhya Pradesh does not fall under the specialized zone for basmati cultivation. Any breach of GI tagging areas will hit the status of the aromatic rice along with nullifying the ultimate objective of Indian GI tagging regulation. Besides, he mentioned the team of eminent agriculture scientists appointed by the government, which rejected the state’s plea. He stated that it is essential not to disturb this to safeguard the interest of farmers and basmati exporters.

Demand Rejected Once

Madhya Pradesh’s demand has already been rejected once. The state applied for getting the GI tag for basmati cultivation in 2017-18. However, the Registrar of Geographical Indications (RGI) rejected it. After that, the state appealed for the same in Madras Court but was unable to get relief.

Madhya Pradesh CM- Congress Working Against the Interest of Farmers

Countering Captain Amarinder’s argument, Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan wrote to Sonia Gandhi. He accused the government of MP is working against the farmers’ interest. Also, he regarded Captain’s letter as politically motivated. Further, he ruled out any connection of the case of APEDA (Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority) with Pakistan. He explained that it has no relation to Madhya Pradesh’s claim of GI tagging. The MP government would move the apex court to challenge the ruling of Madras High Court.

Haryana, Uttarakhand, Delhi, Himachal Pradesh, western UP, and some districts of Jammu and Kashmir have GI tag. The MP government has sought 13 of its districts for the same. GI is a sign assigned to a product that has qualities or a reputation due to its specific origin. 

In all, both leaders have expressed their concerns over the matter, considering farmers’ interests. 

Tags: Amarinderapedabasmati cultivationbasmati exportersBasmati Ricecaptain amarinder singhGI TagGI taggingharyanahimachal pradeshjammu and kashmirMadhya Pradeshmadras courtpakistanpm modiRGIShivraj Singh ChouhanUPUttarakhandhttps://www.grainmart.in/news/punjab-and-madhya-pradesh-in-political-war-over-gi-tag-of-basmati-rice/

 

FDA Sets Limit for Acceptable Amount of Arsenic in Baby Cereal

 

By

 Michaela Rose

 

Cereal can contain arsenic from the grains it uses, but rice cereals are often higher in this toxic substance. The FDA has issued a limit for the amount of arsenic that can be found in rice cereal for infants. It is the first limit the agency has set up for arsenic in any food.

Arsenic in Baby Cereal

Rice is a grain with a high absorption rate for arsenic. It can end up with 10 times more of the metal than other grains. Because rice cereal is usually one of the first solid foods given to babies, it can have a significant impact on development.

Babies may eat multiple servings of rice cereal in a day, which can lead to exposure to inorganic arsenic, which is toxic. It can damage the neurodevelopmental system and harm their IQ.

Arsenic in rice cereal isn’t a new issue. Testing revealed that over 60 percent of rice cereals and other products have arsenic in them back in 2012. Since then, agencies have called for limits on the amount found in these products. Now, eight years later, the FDA has determined a limit of 100 parts per billion for arsenic in infant rice cereal. Other agencies have called for a lower limit.

While this limit is important news to manufacturers of baby cereal, it’s not enforceable. It is voluntary for manufacturers to follow these guidelines. The FDA conducted tests in 2018 on baby rice cereals, looking at the amount of arsenic present. About three-fourths of the products were at or below the new 100 ppb limit.

While critics believe this is an important first step to controlling the amount of arsenic that enters an infant’s system, they say more still needs to be done. Other products should be included, according to consumers advocates. Apple Juice is another product of concern. Experts believe it should be treated the same as drinking water with a limit of 10 ppb.

The Dangers of Arsenic

According to consumer advocates, limits should be given for all heavy metals, including lead and cadmium. The goal should be lower to reduce risk for children.

Arsenic is a natural element, which means it occurs in nature. It can get into the food supply through the soil as well as in the water and air. Contamination can happen with mining or fracking. Volcanoes that erupt can create an increase in arsenic at the surface of the earth.

Long-term exposure of arsenic has been linked to certain types of cancer and skin disorders. Even short-term exposure can lead to nausea and vomiting and other side effects. Young children have a higher risk for learning and development issues, which is why the FDA monitors products for infants and younger people at a higher rate than with other products.

It is important for parents to be aware of these risks and to determine which products are safest for their children. The effects from exposure to arsenic may not be seen right away, but they may be serious.

https://mednews365.com/fda-sets-limit-for-acceptable-amount-of-arsenic-in-baby-cereal/

 

MSG promotes significant sodium reduction and enjoyment of better-for-you foods, according to new study

 

EDELMAN PUBLIC RELATIONS

    

ITASCA, Illinois - A new study published in the Journal of Food Science suggests monosodium glutamate (MSG) can be used to significantly reduce sodium while also promoting the enjoyment of better-for-you foods like grains and vegetables. In the study, supported by Ajinomoto Co., Inc., participants evaluated four different recipes in which sodium was reduced by 31 to 61 percent through the addition of MSG, and described the dishes as "flavorful," "delicious," and "balanced."

Ninety percent of Americans consume too much sodium and often have misperceptions about the taste of nutritious foods creating a barrier to healthy eating. MSG (or umami seasoning) can be one tool to encourage healthier dietary patterns.

"Just as the substitution of butter with olive oil can help to reduce saturated fat intake, MSG can be used as a partial replacement for salt to reduce sodium intake," says Dr. Jean-Xavier Guinard, Professor of Sensory Science, Co-Director of the Coffee Center at the University of California, Davis, and a lead investigator in this study. "MSG has two-thirds less sodium than table salt and imparts umami - a savory taste. Taste is a key factor in what people decide to eat. Using MSG as a replacement for some salt in the diet and to increase the appeal of nutritious foods can help make healthy eating easier, likely leading to a positive impact on health."

Culinary scientists from Pilot R&D, a food innovation and development company, developed four dishes - roasted vegetables, a quinoa bowl, a savory yogurt dip, and cauliflower fried rice with pork. Study participants (163 total, aged 18-62 years) evaluated three different versions of each dish - a standard recipe with typical salt content, a reduced salt recipe with significant sodium reduction, and the same reduced salt recipe with significant sodium reduction plus MSG added. For each dish, participants rated overall liking, appearance, flavor, texture, saltiness, aftertaste, and how likely they would be to order the dish at a restaurant. The reduced salt recipes with added MSG were liked as much as or better than (in the case of the quinoa bowl and savory yogurt dip) the standard recipes, suggesting that MSG can be used as a way to reduce sodium without compromising taste. Whereas the reduced salt recipes were commonly described as "bland" and the standard recipes described as "salty" and "sour" in some cases, the MSG recipes were associated with "delicious," "flavorful," "balanced," and "savory" in some instances.

Previous research has shown that MSG can be used to reduce sodium by 30 percent, and in some cases up to 50 percent, in packaged foods and snacks such as soups, broths, chips, and sausage, without compromising taste and consumer preference for the products. For the first time, this study shows promise for using MSG in better-for-you foods, or those with a desirable nutritional profile that consumers should be eating more of.

"Extensive scientific research confirms MSG's safety, and now we see a benefit of using it to improve the flavor of nutritious foods," says Guinard. "Survey results from our study show that many people are not aware of how to use MSG in their own cooking. The easiest place to start is to replace half of the salt in your salt shaker with MSG, or if a recipe calls for 1 teaspoon of salt, try ½ teaspoon of salt and ½ teaspoon of MSG, instead - and of course, savor the flavor."

As with any study, limitations should be considered. The study could have included many more versions of the recipes with varying levels of salt and MSG to optimize results. However, this is a promising starting point for using MSG in better-for-you foods.

###

About Ajinomoto Health & Nutrition North America, Inc.

Ajinomoto Health & Nutrition North America, Inc. is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ajinomoto Co., Inc., a global leader in the research, development, manufacture and sale of amino acid-based products for the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, sports nutrition, health and beauty industries, as well as food ingredients. The company opened its first American office in New York in 1917 and has since grown and expanded its presence, establishing offices and production facilities in North Carolina, Iowa and Illinois. Ajinomoto Health & Nutrition North America, Inc. leverages an international manufacturing, supply and distribution chain to bring the highest-grade products to customers. For additional information on Ajinomoto Health & Nutrition North America, Inc., please visit https://www.ajihealthandnutrition.com/.

References:

1. Halim J, Bouzari A, Felder D, and Guinard JX. The Salt Flip: Sensory mitigation of salt (and sodium) reduction with monosodium glutamate (MSG) in "Better-for-You" foods [published online ahead of print, 2020 Aug 10]. J Food Sci. doi.org/10.1111/1750-3841.15354

2. Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2020. Scientific Report of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee: Advisory Report to the Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of Health and Human Services. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-08/epr-mps081020.php

 

 

FIU scientist holds one of the top 100 longest-funded NIH research grants

 

Distinguished University Professor Barry P. Rosen, Ph.D., in his lab at HWCOM.

Science & Technology

FIU scientist holds one of the top 100 longest-funded NIH research grants

Barry P. Rosen’s arsenic research funding exceeds $23M in nearly four decades


August 11, 2020 at 1:00pm

FIU annually honors its top scholars—faculty members and administrators whose work demonstrates a significant impact in their respective fields. This year, the university has selected Distinguished University Professor Barry P. Rosen, as an FIU Top Scholar in the category of Established Faculty with Significant Grants. The honor acknowledges Rosen's new Maximizing Investigators' Research Award (MIRA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Rosen, a prolific researcher who works in the Department of Cellular Biology & Pharmacology at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM), is an international expert on arsenic.

"Dr. Rosen is an outstanding educator. And a world-leading microbiologist and biochemist," said Dr. Robert Sackstein, HWCOM dean and senior vice president for Health Affairs at FIU. "He is the epitome of a translational scientist in that he has made seminal basic science contributions to our understanding of arsenic toxicity, and has then harnessed this knowledge to advance clinical care by creating new arsenic-based therapies for drug-resistant microbial infections and cancer."

The Rosen lab collaborates with national and international researchers to study the mechanisms of arsenic toxicity and detoxification. Arsenic, known as the King of Poisons, is the most toxic substance in the environment. It ranks first on the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund list of hazardous substances. Arsenic is often found in water and rice. Continual exposure to arsenic can cause cancer, diabetes, and childhood developmental delays.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has supported Rosen's research on arsenic toxicity and detoxification for nearly four decades, with total funding of over $23M. He was awarded his first NIH R01 grant for this project in 1984. It was renewed as a 10-year MERIT (Method to Extend Research in Time) Award, and most recently as a MIRA until 2025 for $2.2M. This 5-year continuation will place Rosen's funding for this project within the top 100 longest, continuously funded NIH research grants.

Rosen, who has been a faculty member at three medical schools over the last 50 years, remarks that he has been fortunate to have outstanding students and postdocs. "Some of our major findings were serendipitous, but most were the result of hard work, with incremental advances," Rosen said. "Like a crossword puzzle, lots of small findings fit together to reveal overall patterns and insights into the workings of living organisms."

Among his most notable findings: cloned and sequenced the first genes for arsenic resistance; identified the majority of genes for the biotransformation and transport of arsenic; characterized many of those genes at the protein and enzymatic level and solved the three-dimensional structure of many of those proteins; the discovery of a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic, identifying how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice, and the discovery of algae that chemically modify arsenic, reducing it to a less dangerous form.

https://news.fiu.edu/2020/fiu-scientist-holds-one-of-the-top-100-longest-funded-nih-research-grants

 

From the lab to the field, agriculture seeks to adapt to a warming world

By Jim Robbins

August 11, 2020

Description: Illustration of wheat

Illustration of wheat.

Shutterstock

It may be coming to a bakery near you: Bread made from wheat that has had its photosynthetic mechanism refashioned to help it flourish on a warmer planet.

Despite the fact a number of researchers — some funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — are scrambling to create this new breed of wheat, it won’t be arriving any time soon. Increasing temperatures are already taking a toll on the world’s wheat fields. But a new heat-resistant wheat that will replace the types currently grown is a decade or more off in the future.

"The largest single global change that threatens food security is high temperature," said Donald Ort, a professor of plant biology and crop sciences at the University of Illinois who is working on a project called RIPE — Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency — to enhance photosynthesis in food crops, which also would help beat the heat.

The problem is being seen throughout the world. In 2010 and 2012, for example, Russian wheat growers saw their yields decline dramatically because of a combination of hot weather and drought.

"It caused 30 percent reduction in national production, which is really huge," said Senthold Asseng, a researcher at the University of Florida. Russians made up for the shortfall by reducing exports, he noted, but "if you lose a third of your production in India or Bangladesh, that could be a huge disaster."

A study showed that each degree rise in temperature would cause a drop in production of the world’s main food crops.

There is a concerted global effort to help agriculture adapt to the new climate reality as warming continues apace. The most urgent adaptation initiatives, experts say, involve the world’s main food crops — especially wheat, rice, corn and soybeans, which together provide two-thirds of human caloric intake. In a study released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that without fundamental changes in agriculture, the world risks increasing food insecurity.

It’s not just about food. Food shortages are an important driver of social problems. For example, a drought from 2007 until 2010 is considered one of the main factors leading to the civil war in Syria.

2017 study by a group of researchers that included Asseng used models to forecast changes to these main crops under warmer temperatures. The study showed that each centigrade degree rise of temperature would cause a drop in production of all of the crops, led by a plummeting yield in corn of more than 7 percent, wheat of 6 percent, and a drop in soybeans of 3 percent, and rice 3.2 percent. "That means in the next 30 or 40 years, if global temperature rises 3 degrees Celsius we’re talking about 15 to 20 percent loss of wheat yield just from temperature alone," Asseng said.

Climate change brings more than just higher temperatures. A whole suite of problems and benefits come with warmer weather, from too much to too little precipitation (there’s 7 percent more moisture in the atmosphere for every 1 degree C of warming); changes in the timing of precipitation, floods and erosion; abrupt temperature swings; changes in soil health; and more wildfires, which can affect planting, ripening and harvesting. Warmer temperatures also may mean more pests, more diseases and more weeds. And along with the loss of yield, some studies show that important food crops, such as rice and wheat, have reduced levels of protein, iron and zinc as they grow in a more carbon-rich environment.

The variety of rice integral to the Green Revolution is being phased out in places in favor of native cultivars.

All this comes at the same time the demand for food is rising and may increase by 100 percent by 2050 as the global population soars from 7.6 billion to nearly 10 billion. And as the world shifts from fossil fuels to plant-based materials, such as biofuels or bio-plastics, experts say it will require a 30 percent increase in agricultural production. All of this increase will have to be done on agricultural land already in existence so that the Amazon rainforest or other important natural areas won’t need to be destroyed.

Wheat — the largest food crop on the planet, supplying 20 percent of global calories — is getting a lot of the attention from researchers. One of the leading approaches to increasing yield and creating a heat-tolerant wheat is in the optimization of photosynthesis. "Agricultural crops now convert a surprisingly low percentage of sunlight into plant biomass, some 0.5 to 1 percent," said Martin Parry, a leading researcher at Lancaster University in England. "Doubling the percentage to 1 to 2 percent is all we need, and this has already been scientifically proven to be possible."

Researchers are doing this by focusing on Rubisco — an acronym for Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. It’s an ancient enzyme, more than 3.5 billion years old, that evolved with plants. It takes inorganic carbon dioxide and turns it into organic carbon.

But 20 percent of the time, Rubisco grabs oxygen instead of CO2, which leads to a process called photorespiration, which is energetically expensive for the plant and leads to less photosynthesis and smaller yields.

Naked Neck chickens, originally from Romania, are naturally air conditioned because of the lack of feathers.

Ort calls Rubisco the most important enzyme on the planet because it is responsible for converting sunlight into plant tissue, which feeds the world. However, Ort says, "it’s not a very good enzyme. It’s slow. And it makes mistakes. It’s the most abundant enzyme on the planet, and the reason is the way the plants cope with its not being a very good enzyme is to make a lot of it."

What the University of Illinois’s RIPE program and Lancaster University and other labs are focusing on is hacking into the plants to boost the efficiency of Rubisco. "There are more simple ways to do it," says Ort. "These are complete redesigns to try to bypass the native pathways and replace them with a simpler, more efficient pathway" that doesn’t impinge on photosynthesis.

Even with the focus on redesign for photosynthesis, experts say a new cultivar of wheat is at least 10 or 12 years away.

At least one type of wheat that thrives in high temperatures has been grown successfully. Researchers from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas created a wheat crop from ancient and modern strains that can grow in temperatures above 100 degrees. It’s being grown in the Senegal River Basin in West Africa.

Rice, soybeans and other crops also would benefit from a new, redesigned photosynthetic process. Rice, a food source for 3.5 billion people globally, is especially vulnerable. Not only is its yield hurt by higher temperatures, but it also needs a dependable supply of water — it uses 34 to 43 percent of the world’s water supplies for irrigation — and the effects of high temperatures are compounded by irregular weather patterns and the decline in aquifers. Saltwater intrusion as oceans rise is also a serious problem.

 

Ranchers and scientists also look for cows that can thrive in warmer temperatures.

recent study in the journal Nature found that a warming climate is increasing the level of arsenic in rice, which by 2100 could reduce yields by nearly 40 percent.

There are efforts on a number of fronts to prepare rice for the climate emergency, including developing types that are drought, disease and saltwater resistant. The IR8 variety of rice, for example, integral to the Green Revolution in the 1960s, is being phased out in places in favor of native cultivars that are easier on the soil and more disease-resistant.

A team of U.S. researchers are editing the genome of rice in tests to add disease resistance or edit out genes that make the plant susceptible. They look for a plant that might have poor yield but has good disease resistance and then remove the resistant genes and place them in a high-yielding commercial variety "Genome editing allows us to do that with speed and accuracy," Adam Bogdanove, a professor of plant pathology at Cornell University, said.

Researchers in Arkansas, where much of the U.S rice crop is grown, have found that over the last four decades nighttime temperatures have increased by 5 degrees Fahrenheit, which means plants lose more water at night. The increasing heat also reduces photosynthesis and hampers the ability of rice to self-pollinate. Some farmers are talking about moving further north to stay within the crop’s temperature range.

There are other approaches to making agriculture more tolerant in the face of hot temperatures, such as changing the timing of crops or employing agricultural methods that can help crops stay cooler. A recent study in Nature, for example, found that farms in tropical regions that diversify with a mixture of interwoven crops and a border of native forest, instead of a monoculture, help keep the agricultural landscape cooler while also providing more habitat that fosters biodiversity, especially birds.

In addition to crops, livestock and other animals raised for food are also being affected by climate change. Chickens, for example, are especially susceptible to heat.

There are other approaches to making agriculture more tolerant in the face of hot temperatures, such as changing the timing of crops or employing agricultural methods that can help crops stay cooler.

One of the more intriguing solutions is the Naked Neck chicken. It’s an odd-looking bird that appears as if its feathers have been plucked from the bottom of its neck up to its head. What it lacks in beauty, though, it makes up for in function in a changing climate.

These chickens, originally from Romania, are not only naturally air conditioned because of the lack of feathers, they have bigger lungs than other birds and other important physiological traits that allow them to adapt to warmer temperatures. "It’s leggier, too," said Matthew Wadiak, founder of Cooks Venture, which is pasture-raising and selling these birds in Arkansas. "If you have a leggy bird that is upright and off the ground, it has more airflow around it and it can stay cooler."

Ranchers and scientists are also looking for cows that can thrive in warmer temperatures. A breed of animal that may help ranchers in the U.S. Southwest and other arid regions adapt is the raramuri criollo cow — which means "light footed ones" — as a replacement for Angus and Hereford, which have more impact on landscapes.

Drought has plagued the Southwest in recent years and some researchers say it may be a permanent fixture in the region. It has taken a heavy toll on ranching. The criollo were brought to North America from Spain by conquistadors and turned loose before being adopted by, among others, the Tarahumara Indians. Over the last four centuries these cattle have adapted to arid conditions in Mexico.

Two decades ago, they were brought from the Mexican state of Chihuahua to the Jornada Experimental Station near Las Cruces, New Mexico. They since have been adopted by ranchers who have seen benefits, and The Nature Conservancy is studying their impact on the land at its Canyonlands Research Center in Utah.

"These cattle can withstand heat and lack of water," said Nichole Barger, an arid land ecologist at the University of Colorado Boulder who consults at the Canyonlands Research Center. "They are selecting a broader range of different kinds of plants, not just those grasses that are in decline because of climate change."

The most important solution to food security over the long term, of course, is reducing greenhouse gas emissions. There is "no possibility for anybody to say, ‘Oh, climate change is happening, and we will just adapt to it," said Hans Otto Portner, co-chair of the IPCC working group on food and land use. "The capacity to adapt is limited."

https://www.greenbiz.com/article/lab-field-agriculture-seeks-adapt-warming-world

 

N95 respirators can be sanitized using crockpots and rice cookers, study finds

Canela López 

NewsAtIllinois/YouTube

·         A study found 50 minutes of dry heat in an electric cooker like a rice cooker or crockpot can effectively sanitize N95 respirators without damaging their fit or ability to filter out viruses.

·         N95 respirators are crucial for medical workers, as they are the most effective type of mask for filtering out coronavirus particles.

·         A shortage has meant some hospital workers have to reuse N95 respirators. 

·         Researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign say this new cleaning method could help hospital workers safely disinfect their N95 respirators. 

·         Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Rice cookers and crockpots aren't just handy kitchen tools. A study found they may also be an effective way to sanitize N95 respirators — coronavirus-fighting tools for healthcare workers that have been in short supply.

Researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign found that 50 minutes of dry heat in an electric cooker can kill four types of viruses on N95 respirators, including a coronavirus. 

According to a video the researchers published on how to properly disinfect with an electric cooker, you should let the device heat for five minutes until it is at 347 °F before putting a towel in the pot to line the interior, as the heat could melt your mask otherwise.

Stick your N95 respirator inside the pot and let it heat for 50 minutes. 

After 50 minutes, researchers have found the respirators are sanitized, safe to use, and undamaged by the heat. 

Researchers also found the N95 respirators can be treated using the cooker up to 20 times and still maintain their filtration abilities. 

N95 masks filter virus particles and are crucial for healthcare workers

Various N95 respiration masks at a laboratory of 3M, that has been contracted by the U.S. government to produce extra marks in response to the country's novel coronavirus outbreak, in Maplewood, Minnesota, U.S. March 4, 2020. Reuters/Nicholas Pfosi

N95 respirators are crucial pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) for healthcare workers on the frontlines of the pandemic, as they protect against the virus better than other types of masks.

Unlike cloth masks which primarily prevent you from spreading the virus to others or surgical masks which protect you from large droplets and splashes, N95 respirators seal tightly around the nose and filter small particles. 

The shortage of PPE across the US has forced some healthcare workers to reuse N95 respirators and find creative ways to make them last.  

This new dry heat method could provide a safe way for frontline workers to sanitize their masks without compromising their effectiveness. 

Do you have a personal experience with the coronavirus you'd like to share? Or a tip on how your town or community is handling the pandemic? Please email covidtips@businessinsider.com and tell us your story.

Get the latest coronavirus business & economic impact analysis from Business Insider Intelligence on how COVID-19 is affecting industries.

https://www.businessinsider.com/n95-masks-can-be-sanitized-with-electric-cookers-study-2020-8

 

 

 

 

 

Hybrid rice promoted to increase rice self-sufficiency

 

Description: https://www.philrice.gov.ph/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Hybrid-Demo-Pic.jpg

 

In support of the Rice Resiliency Project (RRP) of the Department of Agriculture, Philippine Rice Research Institute, together with other public and private seed companies, has established technology demonstration (techno-demo) farms on hybrid rice this 2020 wet season nationwide.

 

The 14 techno-demo farms that occupy a total area of 11ha showcase Mestizo 1 or M1 (PSB Rc 72H) and Mestiso 20 or M20 (NSIC Rc 204H). With 123-day maturity, M1 averages 5.4t/ha with a maximum yield of 9.9t/ha. M20 matures in 111 days, averages 6.4t/ha, and reaches a yield of 11.7t/ha.

 

The DA’s RRP aims to produce more rice to lift the country’s sufficiency level from the present 87 to 93%. To achieve this, one of the components of RRP is the expanded hybrid rice production. On-farm studies show that hybrid rice yields higher than inbreds by a minimum of 15%.

 

PhilRice participates in the 11th National Rice Technology Forum (NRTF) that showcases hybrid rice and other technologies in the 100-ha techno-demo farm in Butuan City,Agusan del Norte.

 

It also joins the provincial hybrid rice derbies in in Laoag City and Marcos, llocos Norte; Santo Domingo, Ilocos Sur; and Santa Barbara, Pangasinan.

 

Punjab and Madhya Pradesh in Political War Over GI Tag of Basmati Rice

 

August 11, 2020

Gurneel Kaur

Punjab CM asks PM Modi to maintain the status quo on GI tagging for basmati amid the concerns over giving an advantage to Pakistan. Punjab and Madhya Pradesh in the political war over GI tag of basmati rice.

Capt. Amarinder Singh Writes to PM Modi

Punjab’s chief minister has expressed his concerns over providing GI tag to basmati rice of Madhya Pradesh. He said that GI tagging of basmati would adversely affect the state’s agriculture and India’s basmati exports. Further, he added that Madhya Pradesh does not fall under the specialized zone for basmati cultivation. Any breach of GI tagging areas will hit the status of the aromatic rice along with nullifying the ultimate objective of Indian GI tagging regulation. Besides, he mentioned the team of eminent agriculture scientists appointed by the government, which rejected the state’s plea. He stated that it is essential not to disturb this to safeguard the interest of farmers and basmati exporters.

Demand Rejected Once

Madhya Pradesh’s demand has already been rejected once. The state applied for getting the GI tag for basmati cultivation in 2017-18. However, the Registrar of Geographical Indications (RGI) rejected it. After that, the state appealed for the same in Madras Court but was unable to get relief.

Madhya Pradesh CM- Congress Working Against the Interest of Farmers

Countering Captain Amarinder’s argument, Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Shivraj Singh Chouhan wrote to Sonia Gandhi. He accused the government of MP is working against the farmers’ interest. Also, he regarded Captain’s letter as politically motivated. Further, he ruled out any connection of the case of APEDA (Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority) with Pakistan. He explained that it has no relation to Madhya Pradesh’s claim of GI tagging. The MP government would move the apex court to challenge the ruling of Madras High Court.

Haryana, Uttarakhand, Delhi, Himachal Pradesh, western UP, and some districts of Jammu and Kashmir have GI tag. The MP government has sought 13 of its districts for the same. GI is a sign assigned to a product that has qualities or a reputation due to its specific origin. 

In all, both leaders have expressed their concerns over the matter, considering farmers’ interests. 

Tags: Amarinderapedabasmati cultivationbasmati exportersBasmati Ricecaptain amarinder singhGI TagGI taggingharyanahimachal pradeshjammu and kashmirMadhya Pradeshmadras courtpakistanpm modiRGIShivraj Singh ChouhanUPUttarakhand

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PM Modi Unveils Rs 1 Lakh Crore Agriculture Infrastructure Fund Showing Further Commitment to Farmers

 

https://www.grainmart.in/news/punjab-and-madhya-pradesh-in-political-war-over-gi-tag-of-basmati-rice/

 

 

The Rice Stuff Podcast Website Launches with Episode on Promotion in the Western Hemisphere  

 

By Deborah Willenborg

 

ARLINGTON, VA -- The Rice Stuff, USA Rice's podcast, has added a dedicated website at thericestuffpodcast.com featuring full episodes of the show, additional episode information, host profiles, and even a "Podcast 101" section on the "About" page for people new to the medium.

"People typically listen to podcasts on their phone, but we are seeing a lot of listeners on tablets and from computers, and the website presents a nice environment in which to experience the show," said Michael Klein, USA Rice vice president of domestic promotion and communications, and one of the hosts of the podcast.  "You can see photos of the guests and examples of what we are talking about, and, of course, learn interesting facts about your hosts!"

Klein said the website also gives visitors a unique opportunity to participate in the show itself.

"There is a 'Talk to Us!' button on every page that allows you to record a voice memo to us," he said.  "You can let us know what you think of the show, what we got wrong, and share ideas for episodes you would like to hear.  And we may use your audio on a future episode."  

The third episode of the show, "U.S. Rice Promotion in the Western Hemisphere," went live today and features interviews with USA Rice Vice President of International Sarah Moran and Asiha Grigsby, USA Rice director of international promotion.

"It was really exciting to have Sarah and Asiha on the show to talk about U.S. rice promotion overseas, but then to specifically break down some of our top markets which are here in the western hemisphere," Klein said.  Description: C:\Users\abc\Downloads\unnamed.jpg

"We pressed Sarah on funding sources, the philosophy behind the promotions, and even how her team is dealing with new challenges brought about by global trade deals," he continued.  "Then we got into the weeds with Asiha on the different consumer types in the markets and how the COVID-19 pandemic has caused a shift in activities."

Klein and co-host Lesley Dixon also talked about rice recipes from around the world and rice in movies and TV shows, a topic they will surely return to.

New episodes of The Rice Stuff are published on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, and can be found on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher.

 

Looking for Foods With Whole Grains? Read the Packaging Carefully

Whole grain labels on your cereal, bread, and cracker packaging are among the most misleading, study finds.

BY 

AUG 10, 2020Whole grain labels on cereal, bread, and crackers are so confusing or misleading that people may read them wrong up to half of the time, according to a new study published in Public Health Nutrition.

  • Out of 1,030 participants, 51 percent overestimated the amount of whole grains in sample 12-grain bread products and 41 percent overestimated the whole grain count in multigrain crackers.
  • The researchers from Tufts University and New York University say the results provide legal evidence for changes in labeling regulations.

As runners (and humans), health experts always tell us to eat more whole grains. Not only do these healthy carbs fuel our 5Ks, but a diet rich in whole grain foods is also associated with a significantly lower risk of most chronic diseases and early death.

The USDA recommends most adults eat at least three servings (more if you’re very active) of grain-based foods a day. A serving is about one slice of bread, one cup of cold cereal, or one half cup of cooked rice, pasta, or cooked cereal. At least half your daily grain servings should be from whole grains.

The problem is that the labels on food packaging can be so confusing—and often misleading—that even the most well-intentioned consumer can easily end up choosing a less-healthy product without knowing it, according to a study by researchers from New York University (NYU) and Tufts University.

In the study, a group of 1,030 adults were shown photos of both hypothetical products meant to mimic real products on the market, as well as actual products.

The photos showed cereal, crackers, and bread, with various whole grain labeling on the front of the package, along with the nutrition facts label and ingredients list for each product. The participants were asked to identify the healthier option with regards to whole grains for the hypothetical products and assess the whole grain content for the real products.

The packages on the hypothetical products either had no front-of-package label or were marked with “multigrain,” “made with whole grains,” or a whole grain stamp. The packages on the real products displayed the actual product markings, including “multigrain,” “honey wheat,” and “12 grain.”

[poll id='0f72d44a-13c1-49da-832c-fe8e4b63b393_3549c5592b21' type='text' question='Do you read food labels before you buy?' answer1='Never, though I probably should.' answer2='Always. I want to know what I’m eating.'][/poll]

When selecting the healthiest hypothetical products, 29 to 47 percent of the respondents answered incorrectly, with 31 percent choosing incorrectly for cereal, 29 to 37 percent for crackers, and 47 percent for bread.

They didn’t fare much better when asked to assess the whole grain content of real products. Forty-one percent overstated the whole grain content for multigrain crackers, 43 percent overstated the whole grains in honey wheat bread, and 51 percent overestimated the whole grains in 12-grain bread.

The participants guessed best when it came to assessing the whole grain content in oat cereal, which was actually mostly composed of whole grain.

“Our study results show that many consumers cannot correctly identify the amount of whole grains or select a healthier whole grain product,” said first author Parke Wilde, Ph.D., a food economist and professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University said in a press release. “Manufacturers have many ways to persuade you that a product has whole grain even if it doesn’t. They can tell you it’s multigrain or they can color it brown, but those signals do not really indicate the whole grain content.”

The study aimed to assess whether consumer misunderstanding of the labels meets a legal standard for enhanced U.S. labeling requirements for whole grain products. If the labels are deceptive or misleading, public health professionals can push for stronger regulations.

[editoriallinks id='87699692-65c3-4651-872c-039bcd8ffc88' align='left'][/editoriallinks]

“With the results of this study, we have a strong legal argument that whole grain labels are misleading,” coauthor Jennifer L. Pomeranz, M.P.H., assistant professor of public health policy and management at NYU School of Global Public Health, said in the release. “I would say when it comes to deceptive labels, ‘whole grain’ claims are among the worst. Even people with advanced degrees cannot figure out how much whole grain is in these products.”

[Run faster, stronger, and longer with this 360-degree training program.]

Most people don’t get enough high-quality carbs in their diet, which are important to fuel your runs and other workouts.

“A large chunk of Americans’ daily calories—42 percent—comes from low quality carbohydrates. Consuming more whole grains can help change that, but the policy challenge is to provide consumers with clear labels in order to make those healthier choices,” co-senior author Fang Fang Zhang, Ph.D., nutrition epidemiologist at the Friedman School, said in the release.

You can steer clear of food label confusion by looking at the ingredients list, Wilde told Runner’s World, which is ordered from highest to lowest amounts in the package. Additionally, he suggests seeking out products where the first grain ingredient explicitly says whole grain, such as “whole wheat flour” or “brown rice,” since consumers can be tricked by a grain product’s brown coloring or labels such as “multigrain,” “12-grain,” “enriched,” or “contains whole grain,” all of which are permitted on products that are mostly refined grains.

https://www.runnersworld.com/nutrition-weight-loss/a33560956/whole-grain-labels-are-misleading-study/

 

 

 

Rice exports jump 52% in Apr-May

 

Vishwanath Kulkarni  Bengaluru | Updated on August 11, 2020  Published on August 11, 2020

Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/ci7748/article31537325.ece/alternates/WIDE_615/bl09Rice

COMMENT

Panic buying to secure food supplies aiding shipments, say exporters

Non-basmati rice exports are seen rebounding this year as the shipments have begun on a strong note registering over 52 per cent growth in the first two months of the current financial year.

Strong demand from traditional buyers in Africa and likely panic buying by some countries even as the Covid-19 pandemic tightened its grip across the world during this period fuelled the rice shipments, exporters said.

Shipments during April-May this year stood at 11.13 lakh tonnes as against 7.3 lakh in the same period last year, according to DGCIS’ latest figures. In value terms, the exports were up 63 per cent at 3,429 crore as compared to 2,097 crore. In dollar value, the shipments were up 56 per cent at $452 million as compared to $289 million recorded in the same period last year.

“There is a rebound in exports of non-basmati rice,” said BV Krishna Rao, President, The Rice Exporters Association. Rao attributed the spurt in shipments to the rebound in demand from traditional buyers in the African region and also to the factors such as favourable currency, the availability stocks and competitive pricing of the Indian cereal.

Growth in shipment

“Countries could have bought more rice during this period to secure their food supplies as the Covid-19 pandemic was tightening its gripped around the world. Such panic buying could be attributed to around 10 per cent growth in shipments during this period,” Rao said.

Apart from African nations and Nepal, the non-basmati rice shipments has picked up in Malaysia, Philippines and Russia, among other countries.

India, the second-largest producer of rice, has been the largest exporter of the cereal after shipments of non-basmati were allowed from 2011. However, the non-basmati rice shipments had witnessed a decline in the past two years after the Indian cereal had turned expensive. However, with Asian players such as Thailand and Vietnam facing supply issues, Indian rice has turned competitive in recent months. “We are at least 10 per cent lower than Thai parboiled rice,” Rao said, adding that if demand from Bangladesh picks up, the shipments could rise to 2017-18 levels.

Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/2i0tlr/article32329025.ece/alternates/FREE_615/rice-tablejpg

 

The steady growth in rice production has been aiding the exports. From around 96 million tonnes in 2010-11, rice production is seen touching an all-time high of 117.94 million tonnes in 2019-20. In the ongoing kharif season, rice planting has been higher by 17 per cent at 321 lakh ha till August 7.

The basmati shipments during April-May were marginally up in volumes at 8.74 lakh tonnes (8.64 lakh tonnes in the same period last year). However, in value terms, the shipments registered a decline at 5,970 crore (6,488 crore) due to weak pricing.

https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/rice-exports-jump-52-in-apr-may

 

Rice exporters oppose plan on MP basmati rice in GI tagging

 

Following the Madhya Pradesh government’s attempts for a Geographical Indication (GI) tag to basmati rice for its 13 districts, the All India Rice Exporters Association (AIREA) said that the GI tag to MP’s basmati would give advantage to Pakistan, which produced basmati as per GI tagging in 16 districts. Exporters feared that it might lead to a fall in exports and India losing its global platform. “We have requested Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar to intervene as the inclusion of new states will dilute the purpose of GI demarcation. The move will help other countries to expand the area of basmati under GI tagging. Pakistan will grab that opportunity to start sowing basmati all across the country. Thailand will be equally benefited,” said Vijay Setia, former president of AIREA. He said as per GI of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999, a GI tag could be issued for agricultural goods that originated in an area of a country based on its quality. “The GI tag to basmati has been given on the basis of traditionally grown areas falling under the Indo-Gangetic plains due to special aroma, quality and taste of the grain.

Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Delhi, western Uttar Pradesh and select districts of Jammu and Kashmir have GI tagging for basmati,” Setia maintainedNathi Ram Gupta, president of AIREA, condemned the attempt and said it would have a serious negative impact on the Indian exports. “India is the world’s largest exporter of basmati, which it exports to over 150 countries. We have recently met the Chief Minister to raise the issue with the Union government,” he said. Anil Mittal, founder-president of AIREA, said inclusion of Madhya Pradesh in the traditional basmati GI area would be against national interest.

https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/haryana/rice-exporters-oppose-plan-on-mp-basmati-rice-in-gi-tagging-123553

 

 

 

 

Rice exporters oppose plan on MP basmati rice in GI tagging

 

Following the Madhya Pradesh government’s attempts for a Geographical Indication (GI) tag to basmati rice for its 13 districts, the All India Rice Exporters Association (AIREA) said that the GI tag to MP’s basmati would give advantage to Pakistan, which produced basmati as per GI tagging in 16 districts. Exporters feared that it might lead to a fall in exports and India losing its global platform. “We have requested Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar to intervene as the inclusion of new states will dilute the purpose of GI demarcation. The move will help other countries to expand the area of basmati under GI tagging. Pakistan will grab that opportunity to start sowing basmati all across the country. Thailand will be equally benefited,” said Vijay Setia, former president of AIREA. He said as per GI of Goods (Registration and Protection) Act, 1999, a GI tag could be issued for agricultural goods that originated in an area of a country based on its quality. “The GI tag to basmati has been given on the basis of traditionally grown areas falling under the Indo-Gangetic plains due to special aroma, quality and taste of the grain. Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Delhi, western Uttar Pradesh and select districts of Jammu and Kashmir have GI tagging for basmati,” Setia maintainedNathi Ram Gupta, president of AIREA, condemned the attempt and said it would have a serious negative impact on the Indian exports. “India is the world’s largest exporter of basmati, which it exports to over 150 countries. We have recently met the Chief Minister to raise the issue with the Union government,” he said. Anil Mittal, founder-president of AIREA, said inclusion of Madhya Pradesh in the traditional basmati GI area would be against national interest.

https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/haryana/rice-exporters-oppose-plan-on-mp-basmati-rice-in-gi-tagging-123553

 

 

 

 

 

Webinar on advances in rice research

SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

AUGUST 11, 2020 19:27 IST

UPDATED: AUGUST 11, 2020 19:27 IST

THANJAVUR

The Tamil Nadu Rice Research Institute (TRRI), Aduthurai will organise a webinar on “Advances in rice researches for food security and environmental sustainability” on August 13.

A wide range of topics such as advances in rice research under changing climate-quantification of microbial biomass in relation to nutrients supply to rice, use of 15N tracer techniques to characterise N cycling in submerged rice soils, dynamics of methane emission in anaerobic rice soils, the environmental impact of elevated CO2 on methane flux and microbionts in paddy soil, rice culture techniques to mitigate methane emission, site-specific balanced nutrition in rice ecosystem, water sharing techniques and others would be covered in the two-hour long webinar to be inaugurated by the TNAU vice-chancellor, N.Kumar at 10 a.m. on August 13.

Kazuyuki Inubushi, Professor in Soil Science, Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University, Matsudo, Japan, and Sheetal Sharma, Scientist- II in Soil Science, Nutrient Management Specialist (South Asia), Sustainable Impact Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), Philippines, New Delhi Center, will be delivering the guest lectures at the webinar, said the TRRI director, V.Ambethgar, in a release.

Interested persons can register their names free by logging on to https://forms.gle/GdFjF6YqcqrnsHVf7

https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Tiruchirapalli/rice/article32327453.ece

 

Hit by Historic Monsoon, N. Korea Warns of More Floods

 

By William Gallo

August 11, 2020 04:10 AM

Description: Women walk with umbrellas during torrential rains, Wednesday, August 5, 2020, in Pyongyang. North Korea says torrential rains…

Women walk with umbrellas during torrential rains, August 5, 2020, in Pyongyang.

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - North Korea continues to see historic levels of rainfall, further threatening an economy already battered by a coronavirus-related lockdown.  

Torrential rains have flooded hundreds of North Korean homes and wiped out vast swaths of rice fields in the country’s agricultural heartland, according to state media, intensifying worries about a poor harvest and food supply shortage. 

The Korean Peninsula has seen a much longer than usual monsoon seasons this year. The rains are expected to continue for much of the week.  

South Korea has seen 49 consecutive days of rain -- the longest streak on record. The downpours have caused landslides and floods in the South that have killed at least 42 people.  

In the North, the extent of the damage is not precisely known. State media said Friday that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visited a flood-hit village in North Hwanghae province, where 600 hectares of rice fields and more than 900 homes were inundated or destroyed. 

Hwanghae is the North’s most important rice-producing province. North Korean officials appearing on state TV have warned that rivers in both Hwanghae and the nearby province of Gangwon could overflow, according to South Korea’s Yonhap news agency. 

The rains are already more intense than in 2007, when North Korea saw some of its worst floods, according to a briefing by South Korea’s Unification Ministry, which handles inter-Korean relations.

Description: A part of a park near the Han River are flooded due to heavy rain in Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, Aug. 9, 2020. The safety…

 

A part of a park near the Han River are flooded due to heavy rain in Seoul, South Korea, Aug. 9, 2020. The safety ministry said the Seoul area and the southern region are expected to receive more heavy rain on Sunday.

“Their agricultural system is fragile, but they have had floods many times before,” says Peter Ward, a specialist in North Korea’s economy and PhD candidate at the University of Vienna. “I wouldn’t be surprised if it had a significant impact on the harvest.” 

North Korea is particularly vulnerable to flooding. It lacks adequate infrastructure and suffers from widespread deforestation, which resulted in part from people cutting down trees for fuel or firewood or to clear land for farming.  

The floods come as North Korea steps up its anti-coronavirus efforts. Last month, North Korea locked down the southwestern city of Kaesong, after warning that a defector from the South may have brought the virus across the border.  

North Korea has reported no confirmed coronavirus cases, even as it carries out strict measures to keep the disease from spreading. 

North Korea’s Red Cross has mobilized 43,000 volunteers who “have been working alongside health teams and authorities to prevent Covid-19 as well as helping communities to be prepared to evacuate and reduce disaster risks in their areas, including protecting homes from flooding and landslides,” according to a statement from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies. 

“DPRK Red Cross volunteers are providing relief, including tarpaulins, kitchen sets, quilts, hygiene kits and water containers to support 2,800 of the most at risk families in North Hwanghae and (Gangwon) provinces, as well as Kaesong City, also while keeping people safe and preventing COVID-19,” the statement added. 

North Korea formally closed its borders due to coronavirus concerns in late January, shortly after the outbreak was first reported in neighboring China. The lockdown has resulted in plummeting economic activity with China, North Korea’s biggest trading partner. That has put even more strain on an economy already held back by international sanctions.  

In a statement last week, research firm Fitch Solutions said it expected North Korea’s economy to contract by at least 8.5% in 2020, “not only due to a suspected domestic outbreak, but also due to the negative impact the disease will have on the external sector.”

North Korea's secretive government does not consistently release its own economic data. Instead, outside organizations try to estimate North Korea’s economic figures, in part based on numbers from South Korea’s central bank or Chinese customs data. 

https://www.voanews.com/east-asia-pacific/hit-historic-monsoon-n-korea-warns-more-floods

 

 

Elite group formed to drive increased rice production

 

11/08/2020 06:15 PM

KOTA BHARU, Aug 11  – The Kemubu Agricultural Development Authority (KADA) has gathered an elite group of 78 agricultural officers and assistant officers to drive national rice production and improve farmers’ income.

KADA general manager, Nik Roslan Idris, said they come from the KADA headquarters, district branches and area farmers’ organisations and have been tasked with the implementation of government agricultural policies.

Description: http://pcms.bernama.com:7788/storage/photos/b8039f8a688780b1638b836adba5368c5e3250ebe9195

Created under the Rice Subject Matters Specialist (Rice-SMS) Focus Group programme, officers will be armed with knowledge and skills, especially in the use of new technologies.

“The challenge now is to increase yeild because the availability of KADA land is decreasing.

“This endeavour combined with the other programmes to enhance rice production will bring the productivity level up,” Nik Roslan told Bernama after officiating the Rice-SMS Focus Group conference today.

“Through the agricultural extension service, officers will give farmers guidance on land management, fertilising, watering, disease and pest control, as well as post-harvest practices.

“KADA plans to produce 10,000 tonnes of rice per season, but at this point, the 2013-2018 average yield was between 4.13 tonnes/ha and 4.61 tonnes/ha.

“Although there is an upward trend, yield remains at a moderate level. The information delivery system for farmers can improve production to achieve the goals that have been set,” Nik Roslan said.

-- BERNAMA

https://www.bernama.com/en/business/news.php?id=1869277

 

 

Rain restores 60,000 hectares of paddy across Banteay Meanchey

 

 August 11, 2020

 

Sok Chan and Harrison White / Khmer Times 

A view of Banteay Meanchey province rice paddies. Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology

 

More than 60,000 hectares of rice paddy in Banteay Meanchey has been restored after large rainfalls were recorded across the country over the last three days, according to the province’s director of agriculture.

The much-needed downpours came after Banteay Meanchey provincial Department of Agriculture Director Pang Vannaseth told Khmer Times that around 66,000 hectares of rice paddy had been affected by the ongoing drought since the start of the year.

Vannaseth, however, added that there were now fears that too much rainfall could create problems if wide-spreading flooding occurred.

“Since the large downfalls over the last three days, we have been able to rehabilitate much of the rice paddy,” said Vannaseth.

“However, we are now afraid of the potential for flooding if the heavy rain continues over the coming days,” he said.

Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology said that more low to heavy rain is expected across Cambodia until today.

It added that during this period the temperature would vary between 25 and 32 degrees Celsius for the central lowland areas, from 23 to 30 degrees Celsius for the mountainous areas in the north and northeast and between 24 and 32 degrees Celsius in the coastal areas.

Thaung Phorp, 64, a farmer in the Mongkul Borei district of Banteay Meanchey province, said that although there is now rain, unfortunately, four hectares of his paddy are too damaged to salvage.

Thaung Phorp, a farmer in Mongkul Borei district, Banteay Meanchey province, discussing the recent drought. KT/Sok Chan

He added if there is enough rain, he will re-plough and grow paddy again from mid-August to mid- November.

“Most of the rice farmers here grow a variety of rice paddy called Sen Kro Ob. We normally grow
this twice a year. This dry season our crops were too damaged by the drought,” Phorp said.

Normally, one hectare of paddy will yield four to five tonnes of crops, of which about 8,000 baht ($256) is spent on seedlings, pesticide and fertiliser with each tonne selling for about 7,000 Baht ($240) to 7,500 baht ($240.6).

“If we can yield five tonnes per hectare, we can gain a good profit. However, because there was no rain we will have to plough all of our damaged crops again,” Phorp added.

Under Secretary of State of the Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology Chann Sinath said that looking forward the Banteay Meanchey province should not lack enough water because heavy rain is expected across the season.

Banteay Meanchey has 249,449 hectares of rainy season paddy land and 22,000 hectares of dry season paddy used each year for production.

www.khmertimeskh.com/50753735/rain-restores-60000-hectares-of-paddy-across-banteay-meanchey

 

 

Why panic buyers are finding calm but palay farmers are not

 

By: Karl R. Ocampo - Reporter / @kocampoINQ

 

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 04:04 AM August 11, 2020

Palay prices have gone down for the seventh consecutive week as farmers struggled to compete with the influx of imported rice amid lower demand from consumers and ebbing relief efforts.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority’s (PSA) latest price monitoring report, the average farm-gate price of palay during the second week of July went down to P18.49 a kilo after peaking at P21 a kilo in June. This is the seventh week that prices at the farm gate registered a decline—an unusual trend going into the lean season for palay.

The lean months between July and September signal an arduous “waiting time” for farmers; it is the period that separates one harvest from the next. During lean months, palay prices usually pick up given the tight supply.

But the COVID-19 pandemic, coupled with the new rice tariffication law, is also changing price trends.

At the beginning of the lockdown, the government has aggressively imported rice amid panic buying from consumers. Demand, in recent weeks, has normalized to prepandemic levels, however, as buyers have begun adjusting to their consumption patterns while relief efforts have also died down.Federation of Free Farmers national chair Raul Montemayor said the dip in palay prices was something they were already worried about even before the lean season began as imported rice continued to arrive.As of Aug. 7, data from the Bureau of Plant Industry showed that about 1.49 million metric tons of rice entered the country beginning this year, almost half of which arrived two months before the start of the lean season in July.

The Department of Agriculture, upon the ceaseless prodding of industry groups, said they would only be releasing the bulk of rice imports during lean months to avoid unreasonable price spikes in the market and needless competition between local and imported rice.

However, rice prices recorded by the PSA showed minimal price cuts at the retail, reflecting the disconnect between farm-gate and retail rates, often disrupted by middlemen and resellers.

The rice tariffication law is meant to bring down the cost of producing palay to increase farmers’ profit while keeping consumers happy with cheap rice prices. It is a balancing act that has yet to be mastered by economic managers. INQ



https://business.inquirer.net/305034/why-panic-buyers-are-finding-calm-but-palay-farmers-are-not#ixzz6UtoeBCW5

 

Rice farmers disappointed RCEF failed to lower costs

 

Published August 11, 2020, 6:00 PM

by Madelaine B. Miraflor

While the country’s palay output went up during the second quarter of this year, rice farmers are disappointed that the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund (RCEF) – the tariff collected from rice imports and is supposed to help lower the production cost of Filipino rice farmers – did not necessarily help the production of the main staple grow in the last months.

Jaime Tadeo, representative of PARAGOs Pilipinas, said in a statement that there was high expectations for palay output to rebound and improve significantly with the implementation of RCEF, which is one of the crucial components of Rice Tariffication Law (RTL).

To recall, RTL, which allowed the unimpeded entry of cheaper imported rice into the country starting March last year, required the government to provide free seeds and mechanization to rice farmers using RCEF in order to bring down their production cost and in turn be able to compete with rice imports.

RCEF is supposed to be injected with P10 billion annually from 2019 to 2024.

Tadeo noted that after recovering from El Niño, rice production is really expected to recover from 2019 levels and with RCEF, the increase should be significantly higher.

“Where is the impact of all the investments not just on RCEF for 2019 but also of significant budgets for irrigation over the last 4 years,” Tadeo said.

The country’s palay harvests from April to June, according to Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA), reached 4.125 million metric tons (MT), representing a 7 percent increase over the output during the same period in 2019.

This means that the Philippines’ rice output for the first half of the year was slightly higher at 8.386 million MT compared to the same period in 2019.

But compared to production levels of 8.5 million MT and 8.71 million MT in 2017 and 2018, which didn’t have RCEF support yet, the country’s rice output actually went down.  

Aside from RCEF funds, the government has also allocated during the first quarter of this year as much

as P8.5 billion in additional funds for fertilizers and additional seed subsidies under the Department of Agriculture’s (DA) Rice Resiliency Program.

Trinidad Domingo, representative of Pambansang Katipunan ng mga Samahan sa Kanayunan (PKSK), said the lackluster performance of palay can actually be attributed to the impact of RTL.

“Many farmers were disheartened by the low palay buying in 2019 due to the import surge as a result of the Rice Tariffication Law,” Domingo said.

Domingo’s statement was in line with the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) earlier forecast that the Philippines will continue to be the world’s top rice importer over the next two years because Filipino rice farmers already began abandoning their rice farms for other jobs due to low prices amid influx of imported rice.  

Meanwhile, the Federation of Free Farmers (FFF) is now urging the DA to address deficiencies in its support delivery system for rice farmers.  

FFF said it has received reports of delayed deliveries of seeds, substandard seeds with low germination rates, and the provision of seed varieties which farmers do not like.  

According to the group, some local government units (LGUs) have allegedly been charging farmers for delivery and facilitation fees for the free seeds, while some individuals reportedly got multiple rations of subsidized seeds by asking their spouses and children to make separate applications or registering more than one farm plot under the program.

https://mb.com.ph/2020/08/11/rice-farmers-disappointed-rcef-failed-to-lower-costs

 

 China flooding will not impact Philippine rice supply

 

Louise Maureen Simeon (The Philippine Star

) - August 11, 2020 - 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — The Philippines is safe from constraints in its rice supply even as China, the world’s second largest importer, may raise its purchases after it experienced the worst flooding in decades which damaged many of its farmlands.

Agriculture Secretary William Dar assured the public that the country’s rice inventory would be at a comfortable level this year until early-2021.

“By the end of the year, our outlook is good to last for three months and that will give us enough buffer and our local production is also continuous,” Dar told The STAR.

“This year, we are okay, even until the first half of next year,” he said.

China is currently experiencing its worst flooding in many decades, destroying thousands of acres of farmland near the Yangtze River and losing more than 50 percent of the country’s rice production.

Last year, China emerged as the world’s second largest rice importer, after the Philippines, with demand of about 2.5 million metric tons. Now, the worry lies on how much increase will China import to support its population.

This, according to industry analysts, could shake world market prices and may not be favorable for other importing countries like the Philippines.

The Federation of Free Farmers, however, echoed Dar’s optimism that the Philippines would not be at the losing end in the short term or at least this year.

“China has many grain reserves. What they are doing now is releasing those reserves. But since many were hit by the flood, at some point they would have to replenish and go to the international market if they won’t be able to recover their local supply,” FFF national manager Raul Montemayor told The STAR.

“But for the short term, the China flooding has no immediate impact. I think they are still assessing the situation, because if they had started to import, prices would have already shot up. Prices remain stable right now,” he said.

The government continues to rely on the private sector to continue bringing in rice with imports that already entered the country now at 1.7 million MT, already close to the two million MT target.

“Plus, we have directed the National Food Authority  to continue buying from our farmers to add to our buffer stock,” Dar said, adding that “hopefully, the private sector will also continue to buy this coming harvest season to ensure that our farmers will have good prices. “

Add to this is the P8.5 billion Rice Resiliency Project of the DA which is expected to yield an extra one million MT and improve the country’s self-sufficiency level to 93 percent.

https://www.philstar.com/business/2020/08/11/2034287/china-flooding-will-not-impact-philippine-rice-supply

 

Lotus Foods Basmati Is First Rice to Achieve Regenerative Organic Certification


NEWS PROVIDED BY

Lotus Foods 

Aug 11, 2020, 09:59 ET

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

 

RICHMOND, Calif.Aug. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Lotus Foods, the leading heirloom and organic rice company, is proud to announce that its traditional White and Brown Basmati Rice, sourced from family farmers in northern India, has qualified for Regenerative Organic Certified™ (ROC™) Silver. It is the first rice to achieve this rigorous new standard, which goes beyond existing Organic and Fair Trade certifications in promoting farming that enriches rather than degrades soil and values animals and workers.

Description: Lotus Foods Organic Basmati Brown retail bag proudly displays the new logo that it has achieved Regenerative Organic Certification (ROC).

Lotus Foods Organic Basmati Brown retail bag proudly displays the new logo that it has achieved Regenerative Organic Certification (ROC).

In 2018, Lotus Foods was one of 19 brands and farms selected to pilot the Regenerative Organic standards, which is comprised of three pillars: Soil Health and Land Management; Animal Welfare; and Farmer and Worker Fairness. The goal of the pilot process was to develop a greater understanding of how ROC standards can be implemented at the field level and use that experience in finalizing the standards for adoption worldwide. Sixteen different commodities were represented in the pilot. Lotus Foods offered the opportunity to gauge the application of the standards under the conditions of subsistence rice farmers, who are managing plots of land that are a fraction the size of most farms and ranches in the US.

"We couldn't be more thrilled," says Lotus Foods Co-Founder/Co-CEO Caryl Levine. "These farmers, who have been trained to use System of Rice Intensification (SRI) methods, which we call More Crop Per Drop™, have demonstrated that it is very feasible to generate important economic and environmental benefits like increasing yields of traditional varieties, reducing water use and methane emissions and also be regenerative." Lotus Foods traditional White and Brown Basmati Rice is one of only a handful of truly authentic basmati rices, which have been increasingly displaced by modern hybrids that are bred more for yield rather than taste. 

Adds Ken Lee, also Lotus Foods Co-Founder/Co-CEO, "We'd like to express our gratitude to Tapan Ray, our supply partner in India, for his pioneering support of SRI farming practices and commitment to the ROC pilot process. And to Dr. Bronner's for its encouragement. It was a pleasure to work with the Regenerative Organic Alliance (ROA) and NSF International implementing teams and professionals at EcoCert, who conducted the field audit."

"What we do to the soil we do to ourselves," says Elizabeth Whitlow, ROA Executive Director. "Current mainstream farming practices deplete and erode soil, a long-term trend we can't afford for the climate, for our farmers, or the future of food security. The farms and brands we worked with in the ROC™ pilot program are excellent examples of how we can reverse this trend and build healthy soils while growing healthy, resilient communities. Companies like Lotus Foods have long been leading the way on innovation in regenerative rice production methods and are essential for shifting our food system."

Achieving ROC status is a fitting culmination as Lotus Foods celebrates its 25th Anniversary. Over the past 25 years, the company has imported more than 25 million pounds of certified organic rice from a multi-country network of family rice producers whose lives and communities have been transformed by access to markets and organic and Fair Trade premiums. Lotus Foods' commitment to organic and regenerative practices is generating more rice from less land, preserving valuable genetic biodiversity, saving hundreds of millions of gallons of water annually, promoting long-term soil health, and removing greenhouse gasses from the atmosphere. 

For more information and product offerings, visit Lotus Foods online and follow on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

About Lotus Foods
Since 1995, Lotus Foods has partnered in direct and fair trade with small family farmers around the world who are growing rice more sustainably while preserving rice biodiversity. As a certified B Corporation, Lotus Foods is committed to "Changing How Rice Is Grown around the World" by focusing on rice grown using the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), which we call More Crop Per Drop™.   SRI minimizes water usage, empowers women, financially rewards farmers and reduces climate impact.

SOURCE Lotus Foods

Related Links

http://www.lotusfoods.com

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/lotus-foods-basmati-is-first-rice-to-achieve-regenerative-organic-certification-301109813.html#:~:text=RICHMOND%2C%20Calif.%2C%20Aug.,%E2%84%A2%20(ROC%E2%84%A2)%20Silver.

 

 

India’s exports of non-basmati

 rice in first two months of FY21 jumps 52.5%

Description: https://m.economictimes.com/thumb/height-450,width-600,imgsize-744932,msid-77484824/rice.jpg

Reuters

Bangladesh has imposed an import duty of 55% on rice.

Synopsis

Bangladesh too, will open up opportunities for Indian non-basmati rice exports. “Either they will directly buy from private players or they will buy through government-to-government scheme. Whichever way it happens, it will provide a fillip to the...

By Sutanuka GhosalET Bureau

Aug 11, 2020, 05:33 PM IST

KOLKATA: India’s exports of non-basmati rice in the first two months of FY21 has jumped 52.5% to 11.13 lakh tonnes from 7.3 lakh tonnes in the same period of FY20.

Africa has emerged as the major buyer of non-basmati rice and exporters are hoping volumes will increase further when Bangladesh starts importing this variety.


“Africa is depending on India for rice supply this year as Thai rice prices have skyrocketed. Non-basmati rice will do well this year,” said BV Krishna Rao, president, All India Rice Exporters Association.

Rao is optimistic Indian non-basmati rice exports will touch FY18 levels when the country exported 8.64 million tonnes. “Exports of non-basmati rice subsequently went down in the next two years and in FY20 we had achieved exports of 5.04 million tonnes. This drop in non-basmati rice was because the government increased the minimum support price of paddy and farmers were not interested in exports. Also, the government had procured huge quantities of rice. That is why the exports went down,” added Rao.


Bangladesh too, will open up opportunities for Indian non-basmati rice exports. “Either they will directly buy from private players or they will buy through government-to-government scheme. Whichever way it happens, it will provide a fillip to the country’s rice exports,” Rao added.

Traders said rice millers in Bangladesh were demanding high prices for rice that they would provide to the government warehouses.


“Rice consumption has increased in Bangladesh as people are staying indoors due to the coronavirus outbreak. Eating out has stopped. This is increasing the demand for rice in the country” said Suraj Agarwal, CEO, Tirupati Agri Trade.

Agarwal said a decision from the Bangladesh government on import of rice from India is expected by the end of this week or early next week.


Bangladesh has imposed an import duty of 55% on rice, but traders said the government is likely to bring down import duty on rice to 18%.

Bangladesh food ministry is considering importing of rice amid sluggish progress in the procurement of rice and paddy due to a lack of interest among millers and farmers to supply the cereal to public warehouses.

International media reports said that until now, Bangladesh government's food office could meet 20% of its paddy procurement target of 8 lakh tonnes and 45% of its rice procurement target of 11.5 lakh tonnes. And if it progresses this way, then the target of paddy procurement is unlikely to be achieved within the deadline of 31 August.

(Catch all the Business NewsBreaking News Events and Latest News Updates on The Economic Times.)

https://m.economictimes.com/news/economy/agriculture/indias-exports-of-non-basmati-rice-in-first-two-months-of-fy21-jumps-52-5/amp_articleshow/77484714.cms

 

Tamil Nadu farmers anticipate higher crop yield with timely reopening of Mettur dam

TE Raja Simhan  Chennai | Updated on August 11, 2020  Published on August 11, 2020

Along with good monsoon and ample storage, farmers expect a bountiful production next year

Amidst gloomy economic scenario there is cheerful news coming from rural Tamil Nadu as the State is likely to witness a higher agriculture production this crop year (July 2020 to June 2021) due to the timely opening of the Mettur dam on June 12, coupled with good seasonal rain in catchment areas.

https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/tamil-nadu-farmers-anticipate-higher-crop-yield-with-timely-reopening-of-mettur-dam/article32325323.ece#:~:text=Amidst%20gloomy%20economic%20scenario%20there,seasonal%20rain%20in%20catchment%20areas.

 

 

 

Rice Prices

as on : 11-08-2020 03:29:40 PM

Arrivals in tonnes;prices in Rs/quintal in domestic market.

Arrivals

Price

Current

%
change

Season
cumulative

Modal

Prev.
Modal

Prev.Yr
%change

Rice

Manjeri(Ker)

290.00

NC

12180.00

3500

3500

NC

Sultanpur(UP)

200.00

11.11

8087.00

2400

2350

-12.73

Shahjahanpur(UP)

150.00

-21.05

7991.00

2600

2605

-0.57

Gondal(UP)

108.00

-6.9

8825.00

2400

2420

-2.04

Sindhanur(Kar)

100.00

900

132.00

2400

3000

-

Azamgarh(UP)

90.00

-5.26

5979.20

2570

2565

5.33

Barabanki(UP)

84.00

-1.18

1003.00

2435

2470

0.21

Dadri(UP)

80.00

-36

2370.00

5950

5950

-

Hardoi(UP)

70.00

16.67

8957.80

2430

2450

-2.80

Bindki(UP)

70.00

-12.5

6140.00

2500

2500

5.04

Barhaj(UP)

70.00

-30

10765.00

2580

2580

7.50

Gorakhpur(UP)

65.00

22.64

1404.70

2565

2550

-

Birbhum(WB)

58.00

-3.33

489.00

2540

2530

5.83

Manvi(Kar)

50.00

-50

1121.00

1700

1700

-

Ghaziabad(UP)

50.00

25

2925.00

2840

2850

-2.74

Maur(UP)

46.00

-22.03

779.00

2575

2570

4.89

Sehjanwa(UP)

45.00

-10

2723.50

2565

2560

18.75

Khalilabad(UP)

40.00

-20

2000.00

2550

2550

13.33

Lakhimpur(UP)

40.00

NC

2981.00

2420

2440

2.11

Saharanpur(UP)

37.00

-22.92

2919.50

2740

2720

-6.80

Aligarh(UP)

35.00

-12.5

4662.00

2540

2550

-0.39

Meerut(UP)

31.50

10.53

1081.50

2830

2830

-4.71

Shamli(UP)

31.00

-11.43

1429.90

2785

2775

0.91

Basti(UP)

30.00

-14.29

1862.00

2570

2570

5.54

Muradabad(UP)

30.00

-14.29

1867.00

2630

2620

3.14

Soharatgarh(UP)

30.00

150

1591.70

2560

2570

4.92

Asansol(WB)

30.00

-6.25

1309.01

3100

3100

9.15

Guskara(Burdwan)(WB)

29.00

11.54

509.00

2500

2500

-

Lalitpur(UP)

28.00

-12.5

1776.50

2460

2450

-8.21

Mathura(UP)

28.00

3.7

3223.50

2550

2550

-0.78

Choubepur(UP)

28.00

-27.27

2539.85

2500

2500

-6.54

Katwa(WB)

27.50

1.85

456.30

2500

2500

-

Chorichora(UP)

27.00

17.39

1578.50

2550

2560

6.92

Balrampur(UP)

26.00

36.84

1170.00

2425

2420

5.43

Pukhrayan(UP)

25.00

150

680.00

2450

2470

4.26

Shahganj(UP)

25.00

56.25

151.00

2610

2650

11.54

Mainpuri(UP)

24.00

-4

4224.00

2665

2610

1.33

Egra/contai(WB)

22.00

4.76

618.00

2600

2600

13.04

Partaval(UP)

21.50

-28.33

854.50

2550

2550

11.60

Muzzafarnagar(UP)

21.00

5

4664.00

2785

2780

-5.75

Rampur(UP)

21.00

5

785.50

2620

2620

2.34

Vilaspur(UP)

21.00

5

1767.20

2630

2630

4.78

Chintamani(Kar)

20.00

100

585.00

2500

2500

11.11

Agra(UP)

20.00

NC

3612.00

2650

2620

-0.38

Madhoganj(UP)

20.00

-42.86

3803.50

2430

2430

8.00

Durgapur(WB)

20.00

-16.67

1248.25

2860

2850

8.75

Kayamganj(UP)

18.00

20

2070.00

2500

2490

-6.02

Utraula(UP)

17.50

-2.78

676.70

2430

2430

-

Sirsaganj(UP)

16.50

-2.94

1246.50

2610

2600

-3.15

Gazipur(UP)

15.50

10.71

2243.00

3250

3250

0.62

Etawah(UP)

15.00

50

2672.50

2525

2535

-2.88

Sahiyapur(UP)

15.00

25

2721.00

2560

2560

5.57

Paliakala(UP)

15.00

-34.78

817.50

2400

2420

5.96

Bahraich(UP)

14.00

-46.15

1187.90

2400

2400

-1.23

Jangipura(UP)

14.00

27.27

716.00

2650

2660

13.25

Robertsganj(UP)

12.50

38.89

344.10

2475

2500

5.32

Bharthna(UP)

12.50

13.64

2404.50

2550

2550

-3.41

Rasda(UP)

12.50

4.17

592.50

2570

2575

1068.18

Farukhabad(UP)

12.00

9.09

1282.00

2460

2460

-7.17

Pratapgarh(UP)

11.00

-29.03

517.00

2425

2415

8.50

Raath(UP)

9.00

32.35

300.90

2350

2350

-

Jafarganj(UP)

9.00

-35.71

1169.00

2380

2420

1.28

Karvi(UP)

8.50

-15

696.00

2440

2430

3.17

Badayoun(UP)

8.00

-20

1120.50

2650

2625

5.16

Etah(UP)

8.00

-11.11

494.50

2620

2600

2.34

Unnao(UP)

8.00

2.56

262.40

2450

2450

-1.01

Devariya(UP)

8.00

6.67

1121.50

2570

2585

6.20

Ajuha(UP)

8.00

14.29

454.00

2480

2500

1.22

Banda(UP)

7.00

-6.67

396.50

2440

2435

4.27

Mohamadabad(UP)

7.00

-12.5

910.80

2470

2480

-

Mirzapur(UP)

6.00

20

329.50

2685

2680

11.18

Fatehpur(UP)

5.60

21.74

2334.30

2495

2500

6.17

Bareilly(UP)

5.50

-54.17

2033.00

2580

2590

1.98

Atarra(UP)

5.00

-16.67

890.50

2425

2450

2.75

Kasganj(UP)

5.00

-16.67

528.50

2610

2600

1.56

Mawana(UP)

5.00

-50

349.20

2800

2780

-

Raibareilly(UP)

5.00

-28.57

1696.50

2475

2470

10.00

Jhijhank(UP)

5.00

-50

456.50

2500

2520

-

Kannauj(UP)

4.50

12.5

480.10

2500

2520

-5.30

Lucknow(UP)

4.20

23.53

4990.30

2440

2430

-12.07

Jahangirabad(UP)

4.00

NC

280.00

2660

2640

-0.75

Kosikalan(UP)

3.60

20

267.80

2560

2540

1.99

Auraiya(UP)

3.50

75

275.10

2530

2540

-3.44

Fatehpur Sikri(UP)

3.50

9.38

164.70

2580

2590

0.39

Chitwadagaon(UP)

3.50

16.67

493.80

2600

2590

23.81

Tundla(UP)

3.50

NC

318.50

2630

2620

1.94

Jayas(UP)

3.40

-2.86

737.40

2300

2300

12.20

Naanpara(UP)

3.40

-15

697.70

2390

2390

1.27

Mahoba(UP)

3.30

NC

480.20

2460

2460

8.61

Chhibramau(Kannuj)(UP)

3.30

-2.94

634.50

2470

2460

-5.00

Tulsipur(UP)

3.00

50

109.10

2420

2420

-

Charra(UP)

2.80

40

134.50

2560

2550

0.39

Bishnupur(Bankura)(WB)

2.00

-4.76

210.10

2600

2600

NC

Jhansi(UP)

1.80

28.57

156.20

2470

2485

4.00

Baberu(UP)

1.60

-11.11

98.70

2430

2420

9.21

Muskara(UP)

1.60

6.67

90.90

2400

2400

2.13

Melaghar(Tri)

1.50

50

72.30

2700

2700

NC

Lalganj(UP)

1.50

50

283.00

2350

2350

-

Shikohabad(UP)

1.50

50

278.00

2610

2600

-11.53

Akbarpur(UP)

1.50

-6.25

419.80

2410

2410

-0.82

Panichowki(Kumarghat)(Tri)

1.40

-6.67

66.40

2850

2900

-

Maudaha(UP)

1.30

62.5

36.60

2355

2350

0.64

Alibagh(Mah)

1.00

NC

98.00

2200

2200

NC

Murud(Mah)

1.00

NC

97.00

2200

2200

NC

Tanda Urmur(UP)

1.00

NC

14.30

2415

2440

-

Anandnagar(UP)

1.00

-16.67

224.10

2540

2545

10.43

Bharuasumerpur(UP)

1.00

-33.33

35.80

2500

2500

28.21

Khair(UP)

1.00

-33.33

83.80

2590

2590

-0.38

Balarampur(WB)

1.00

-33.33

30.03

2600

2600

0.78

Khatra(WB)

0.90

-10

110.40

2600

2600

NC

Atrauli(UP)

0.70

16.67

10.50

2560

2560

-

Dahod(Guj)

0.60

-71.43

1048.00

4200