Friday, July 17, 2020

Basmati Rice Market Outlook 2020 | Business development | Research Report 2027

Basmati Rice Market Outlook 2020 | Business development | Research Report 2027

Trusted Business Insights answers what are the scenarios for growth and recovery and whether there will be any lasting structural impact from the unfolding crisis for the Basmati Rice market.

Trusted Business Insights presents an updated and Latest Study on Basmati Rice Market 2019-2026. The report contains market predictions related to market size, revenue, production, CAGR, Consumption, gross margin, price, and other substantial factors. While emphasizing the key driving and restraining forces for this market, the report also offers a complete study of the future trends and developments of the market. The report further elaborates on the micro and macroeconomic aspects including the socio-political landscape that is anticipated to shape the demand of the Basmati Rice market during the forecast period (2019-2029).
It also examines the role of the leading market players involved in the industry including their corporate overview, financial summary, and SWOT analysis.

Get Sample Copy of this Report @ Global Basmati Rice Market 2020 (Includes Business Impact of COVID-19)

Global basmati rice market is expected to be valued at US X Mn in 2020 and register CAGR of X % by end of 2028. The global basmati rice market by operating environment report has been segmented on the basis of product type, application, and region.

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Basmati Rice: Product Overview

The widely used basmati rice is nutritious, low-calorie, fibrous food which contains vitamins, proteins, minerals, and has an aromatic flavor. There are two types of basmati rice commonly available and used, such as white basmati rice and brown basmati rice. This rice can either be used raw, parboiled, steamed, etc. Basmati rice contains the eight necessary indispensable amino acids, folic acid, low sodium with no cholesterol, which is essential for human body and is considered good for individuals with heart-related issues and diabetes.

Global Basmati Rice Market Dynamics:

Increasing population and rising demand for healthy food products, coupled with high amount of cultivation of Basmati rice, especially in India, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Pakistan, and other countries in Asia Pacific region is a major factor expected to drive growth of the global basmati rice market. In addition, rice is one of the staple food consumed by individuals across the world, especially Asian countries, which is also another factor expected to continue to support growth of the global basmati rice market in the years to come.

Moreover, basmati rice is helpful for weight loss as it contains low carbohydrate, improves vitamins B deficiency, increases magnesium, and help to build healthy bone, which in turn is anticipated to drive growth of the global basmati rice market. Furthermore, basmati rice helps in improving deficiency of iron, and consumption of basmati brown rice which contains high fiber content are other major factors expected to boost growth of the global basmati rice market.

Basmati rice is also being used for production of personal care products and cosmetics which is expected to support market growth to a significant extent.

Increasing preference for online shopping, along with rising focus of manufacturers to make their products visible on E-commerce and M-commerce platforms is expected to further support market growth.

Analysis by Segment

By Product Type:

Among the product type segments, the raw segment is expected to account for considerable share in terms of revenue in the global basmati rice market.

By Species:

Among the two basmati rice species segments, the white rice segment is expected to dominate in the target market in terms of value and consumption. The brown rice segment is projected to register considerable growth rate owing to rising preference towards healthy options by consumers in various developed as well as developing countries across the globe.

By Application:

Among the application segments, the food segment accounted for major revenue share in 2018 and is expected to continue to dominate in the global market over the next 10 years.

By End-use:

Among the two end-use segments, the commercial segment is projected to register considerable growth rate in terms of value and consumption over the next 10-year period, owing to increasing adoption of basmati rice by restaurants, food processing industries, bakery sector, personal care products industry, among others.

Regional Analysis:

The market in the Asia Pacific is expected to account for significant share in terms of revenue in the global basmati rice market, owing to growing demand for raw basmati rice by consumers in most of the countries as it is staple food and growing spending capacity of population on superior quality food products. In addition, rising trend of consumption of food of higher nutritional value such as brown basmati rice specifically by individuals focusing on losing weight is expected to further support growth of the Asia Pacific market. The market in North America is expected to witness lucrative growth in the target market in terms of revenue share, owing to high demand for rice and rice-based products in countries in the region. The Europe market is expected to account for significant revenue share in the target market owing to ever-increasing demand for bakery products and rice as an ingredient for flavor and fragrance.

Global Basmati Rice Market Segmentation:

Global Market Segmentation, by Product Type:

Raw
Steamed
Parboiled

Global Market Segmentation, by Species:

Brown rice
White

Global Market Segmentation, by Application:

Food
Cosmetics and personal care

Global Market Segmentation, by End-use:

Commercial
Residential

Global Market

Quick Read Table of Contents of this Report @ Global Basmati Rice Market 2020 (Includes Business Impact of COVID-19)

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17th July,2020 Daily Global Regional Local Rice E-Newsletter

Duty cut on rice import to hit next harvest


 July 16, 2020 22:00:39

The government's decision for a cut on import duty of rice appears to be a hastily taken one. The reason for the decision, according to the food ministry, is the shortfall in the ongoing procurement of Boro rice this year. Curiously, this shortfall has nothing to do with the availability of the major staple which, as reports say, has experienced a bumper harvest. So, what is it that impedes the procurement drive? It is the price set by the government at Tk 35-36 a kg which according to experts is well below the market price. As a result, neither farmers nor millers are interested to sell their produce to the government at prices they consider unreasonable. Reports say currently coarse rice sells at Tk 42-45 per kg, while medium and finer varieties sell at Tk 48-54 and Tk 55-65 respectively. The current price of coarse rice is 16-18 per cent higher than that of the last year.

The procurement drive that began on April 26 and would continue until August 31 has, so far, been able to accomplish very little, collecting some 0.34 million tonnes of rice till July 05 as against the procurement target of 19.5 million tonnes. Presently, the government has 0.9 million tonnes of rice in stock which was 1.37 million tonnes in the corresponding period of the previous year. Clearly, there was a serious mismatch in fixing the procurement price, and one wonders how the authorities did so disregarding the market price. The anticipated bumper harvest might have influenced the price-setting, but once it became apparent that market prices were higher, and that farmers and millers would not bother to help the government build its stock receiving less than the market prices, the authorities should have revised the prices.

It may be noted that the agriculture ministry had said last month that the fairly good harvest of Boro paddy was capable of getting rid of worries about food security for the coming six months.   Over and above, the next major paddy crop Aman which is set to be harvested in less than six months and that of Aus coming up in three to four months make it a no-worry situation so far as food security is concerned for the next one and a half years. Obviously, such optimism was backed up by the government's readiness to build an adequate stock and that could be possible on offering a reasonable price.

Now that the duty on rice import is set to be reduced, concerned quarters are unanimous that it would seriously harm the next crop Aman besides affecting the state coffer through spending in foreign exchange on import. If imports start arriving from August, observers fear, prices of this second important crop Aman could drop drastically during the harvesting season from November to January. As a result, farmers in the vast swathes of the Aman-growing regions in the eastern part of the country would be hard hit. The policymakers would do well to take this factor into consideration before further firming up the decision of duty reduction.

https://thefinancialexpress.com.bd/editorial/duty-cut-on-rice-import-to-hit-next-harvest-1594915239

India sees sharp rise in edible oil exports at 80,765 tonnes for 2019-20

Our Bureau  Ahmedabad | Updated on July 16, 2020  Published on July 16, 2020

Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/incoming/b2nsj8/article26982102.ece/alternates/WIDE_615/edible-oiljpg

At current tariff value of USD 573 per tonne for refined palmolein, SOPA said the amount of customs duty being evaded is  19,968 per tonne.   -  Reuters

 

Brightens price prospects for oilseed growers

In a major boost for India’s oilseed sector, the country has recorded a sharp jump — nearly 54 per cent — in edible oil exports to 80,765 tonnes for 2019-20, according to government data.

India had exported 52,490 tonnes of edible oils in 2018-19. The country earned 955.51 crore during 2019-20 from the exports, which is more than 320 crore higher from 627 crore recorded in the previous year.

The rise in bulk exports is seen as a big boost to oilseed growers as it brightens the prospects for better remuneration for their oilseed crops. Edible oils are freely exportable in bulk, while mustard oil is allowed in consumer packs not exceeding 5 kg. Major oils exported are groundnut oil, rice bran oil and also small quantity of sesame oil, sunflower oil and mustard oil. Groundnut oil is a major oil exported from India with a total of 38,226 tonnes of exports worth 390 crore. China is a major buyer of India’s groundnut oil (crude and edible) with 33,505 tonnes. Last year, India had exported 15,533 tonnes of groundnut oil worth 128 crore.

Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/4mrpjt/article32106018.ece/alternates/FREE_615/edible-oil-importsjpg

 

Bhutan and Canada are the largest buyers of India’s soyabean oil with 5,708 tonnes and 2,193 tonnes respectively, while the US imports 1,140 tonnes of soyabean oil from India. India exported 9,822 tonnes of soyabean oil during 2019-20, which is valued at 86.23 crore. Soyabean oil exports for 2018-19 were recorded at 4,246 tonnes worth 38 crore.

India also exported mustard oil in consumer packs of 5 kg at 3,681 tonnes worth 46.97 crore, mainly to the UAE with 963 tonnes and to the US with 445 tonnes. India reported a rise in exports of sesame oil and coconut oil over the last year at 5,618 tonnes and 7,870 tonnes, respectively, showing a year-on-year growth of over 12 per cent and 15 per cent, respectively.

“The rise in exports of edible oils is a positive development for India’s oilseed growers. This enables higher realisations for their crops,” said BV Mehta, Executive Director, The Solvent Extractors’ Association of India (SEA).

Export of rice bran oil has been allowed in bulk since September 2015, which has helped boost exports. As per data compiled by SEA, India exported 12,521 tonnes of rice bran oil and small quantity of mahua and mango kernel oils worth 127 crore. In 2018-19, India exported 12,807 tonnes of rice bran oil. Major buyers for India’s rice bran oils are the US, Japan, Malaysia and Thailand.

Published on July 16, 2020

https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/india-sees-sharp-rise-in-edible-oil-exports-at-80765-tonnes-for-2019-20/article32103883.ece

 

Bird Droppings Carry Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, Cause Food Poisoning

 

July 16, 2020 by News Desk Leave a Comment

Whenever there is a food poisoning outbreak linked to produce, we have told you that one source of the pathogen may be bird droppings. A new study conducted at Rice University and published in Elsevier journal Environmental Pollution states that bird droppings carry antibiotic resistant bacteria and may “harbor abundant” numbers of the pathogen along with resistance genes.

Description: Bird Droppings Carry Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria

The study was conducted by environmental engineers and led by postdoctoral research associate Pingfeng Yu of Rice’s Brown School of Engineering and co-author Pedro Alvarez.

Earlier studies showed that bird-borne antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) and bacteria can be transferred to humans through these vectors: swimming, contact with bird feces or contaminated soil, and inhaling aerosolized fecal particles.

Alvarez told Science Daily, “We still do not fully understand what factors exert selective pressure for the occurrence of ARGs in the gastrointestinal system of wild urban birds. Residual antibiotics that are incidentally assimilated during foraging is likely one of these factors, but further research is needed to discern the importance of other potential etiological factors, such as bird diet, age, gut microbiome structure and other stressors.”

The scientists compared fresh fecal samples from each bird species found in the Houston area in the winter and summer months to samples taken from poultry and livestock that may carry some of the same mutations. They found that antibiotic resistant genes in all species had significant resistance to tetracycline beta-lactam and sulfonamide antibiotics. And the “relatively high abundance” of ARGs were comparable to those found in fresh feces of domesticated poultry that are given antibiotics in their feed.

Alvarez added, “Our results indicate that urban wild birds are an overlooked but potentially important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance genes, although their significance as vectors for direct transmission of resistant infections is possible but improbable due to low frequency of human contact.”

They also found that ARGs were in the soil up to 1 inch deep around the bird droppings, which may play a role in contamination of crops.

The researchers concluded that since bird droppings carry antibiotic resistant bacteria, people should avoid contact with them, especially vulnerable groups who are at high risk for complications from infections. The bacteria can cause respiratory infections, food poisoning, and sepsis.

Huiru Zhao, Ruonan Sun, Pingfeng Yu, Pedro J.J. Alvarez. High levels of antibiotic resistance genes and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria indicators in urban wild bird fecesEnvironmental Pollution, 2020; 266: 115200 DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2020.115200

Filed Under: Food SafetyNews Tagged With: Antibiotic ResistanceFood Safety

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https://foodpoisoningbulletin.com/2020/bird-droppings-carry-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-cause-food-poisoning/

 

ASIA RICE-THAI RATES HIT 4-MONTH LOW ON WEAK DEMAND, BAHT

7/16/2020

* Fresh supplies could push prices further down- Thai trader

* Vietnamese traders expect rise in rice shipments to Europe

* India rates steady as farmers expand cultivation area

* Flood hits cultivation in Bangladesh

By Shreyansi Singh

BENGALURU, July 16 (Reuters) - Thai rice export prices dipped to an over four-month low this week due to lack of buyers and weakening of the baht, while strong demand from Cuba and Malaysia pushed Vietnamese rates to a near one-month high.

Thailand's benchmark 5-percent broken rice <RI-THBKN5-P1> prices dropped to $440–$455 on Thursday, the lowest since late-February, from $455-$485 quoted last week.

Thai rates were also weighed down by expectations of fresh supply of rice early next month.

"With no buyers now, the injection of new supply could push down the price further," a trader said.

In Vietnam, rates for 5-percent broken rice <RI-VNBKN5-P1> rose to $435-$457 per tonne, the highest since June 18, from $425-$457 a week earlier.

"Strong demand from Cuba and Malaysia have pushed prices up a bit," a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.

"However, trading activity has slowed down this week as some buyers are waiting for prices to go down in anticipation of increased supplies from the ongoing harvest that will end early next month."

Traders expect an increase in rice shipments to Europe after a free trade agreement between Vietnam and the European Union takes effect from August 1, while the EU's imposition of an annual quota will prevent a sharp rise in exports.

Rates for India's 5-percent broken parboiled variety <RI-INBKN5-P1> were unchanged at $377-$382 per tonne, as farmers expand acreage of the summer-sown paddy crop.

"Demand is moderate. Rising cases of coronavirus in Asia and Africa is a big concern. It could create logistical problems for buyers and sellers," said an exporter based at Kakinada, in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.

Indian farmers have planted rice on 12 million hectares as of July 10, up 26% from a year earlier, government data showed.

Bangladesh will make a decision over cutting taxes on rice imports by the end of this month, food ministry officials said.

Floods also hit cultivation in Bangladesh, farmers said, submerging tracts of land. (Reporting by Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai, Ruma Paul in Dhaka, Khanh Vu in Hanoi and Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok; Editing by Krishna Chandra Eluri)

http://about.reuters.com/fulllegal.asp

https://www.agriculture.com/markets/newswire/asia-rice-thai-rates-hit-4-month-low-on-weak-demand-baht

 

 

New genes control plant height, could lead to flood-proof crops

Deep-water rice can outgrow floods, as here, in Vietnam.

JOSE MORE/VWPICS/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Description: https://www.sciencemag.org/sites/default/files/styles/inline__450w__no_aspect/public/rice_1280p_0.jpg?itok=bxY0O8l1Stature matters to plants. Short crops can carry more grain without bending under their own weight—a key trait that helped power the Green Revolution in the 1960s. But tall plants are better at surviving long floods. Now, researchers have found two genes that together help control the height of rice plants: one that accelerates the elongation of the stem and another that acts as a brake. If the system is similar in other plants, scientists say it could be useful in the breeding of many kinds of crops.

“This could be one more great tool in the toolbox,” says Julia Bailey-Serres, a rice biologist at the University of California, Riverside, who was not involved in the new research.

In the mid–20th century, plant breeders typically selected for wheat and rice varieties with short stems; these plants devoted more resources to grain and were less likely to fall over in heavy wind or rain. Biologists later discovered that these varieties, at certain times in their development, produce less of a hormone called gibberellic acid (GA) or can’t respond to its signals to elongate their stems. Side effects of those mutations can include young plants that sometimes emerge from the ground too soon in drought-prone regions.

Plant molecular geneticist Motoyuki Ashikari of Nagoya University and colleagues have been studying rice varieties that survive long, deep floods by growing taller—and quickly, if need be, up to 25 centimeters per day. So-called “deep-water rice” is grown in delta areas, mainly in Southeast Asia where slow seasonal floods can reach 1 meter or deeper. Previous work had shown that when plants are submerged, ethylene gas accumulates in their tissues and triggers GA production. Ashikari and his colleagues wanted to know how GA coaxes stems to grow in deep-water varieties of rice.

The team compared the DNA of one species of deep-water rice with another rice variety that can only grow in shallow water. They soon located the two genes, which they dubbed ACE1 (accelerator of internode elongation) and DEC1 (decelerator of internode elongation). Greenhouse experiments showed what the genes did: In deep-water rice, ACE1 turns on when plants are covered in water, stimulating cell division in their stems and helping them grow, the researchers report this week in Nature. But a typical shallow-water variety, which has a mutation in ACE1, did not lengthen its stem when flooded.

In other experiments, the team showed that DEC1 suppresses stem growth. DEC1 was active in the shallow-water variety, and it stayed active when those plants were flooded, essentially keeping the brakes on stem growth. In contrast, when deep-water rice was exposed to flooding, the brakes were lifted: DEC1 stopped expressing, further allowing for stem growth.

If plant breeders or molecular biologists can control those two genes, they might be able to adjust plant height without having to modify GA levels—perhaps even in crops other than rice—says Laura Dixon, a plant biologist at the University of Leeds. That means GA would continue to influence other parts of the plant normally. The two new genes could act like a simple “dimmer switch” for plant height, says Susan McCouch, a rice biologist at Cornell University, who was also not involved in the research.

The two genes also exist in sugarcane, barley, and the well-studied grass Brachypodium distachyon. They might occur widely in other agriculturally important grasses, Ashikari believes. Another important crop, corn, has an equivalent to ACE1, but it has a gene that only partially resembles DEC1. Still, the range of species with the two genes makes the new discovery “supersignificant,” McCouch says.

The genes might help rice breeders improve low-yield varieties that can already cope with seasonal flooding—or engineer new ones from productive shorter varieties. If this approach works in other plants, it could even help engineer flood-proof crops for areas experiencing more frequent flooding because of climate change, including the U.S. Midwest, Bailey-Serras says. Such efforts would depend entirely on whether the genes in the target crops are responsive, but, “It would make a heck of a lot of difference to the farmer.”

Posted in: 

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/07/new-genes-control-plant-height-could-lead-flood-proof-crops

Agriculture’s extremely tiny saviors

 

 

 

BY KAT MCGOWAN

INDIGO

Description: Cotton plants designed to tolerate drought in a field in Arkansas.To hear Geoffrey von Maltzahn talk, the future is in the dirt. But he means that in a good way. He is one of several entrepreneurs who are convinced that the toughest problems in agriculture can be solved in the ground by microbes — the teeming communities of microscopic life such as bacteria and fungi that shape the health and vitality of plants, people, and, basically, all life on this planet.

Von Maltzahn’s Boston-based company, Indigo Ag, intends to harness the marvelous abilities of microbes to nourish crops, protect plants from drought and heat, reduce agricultural pollution, use less fossil fuel for farming, and make corn, wheat, rice, soy, and cotton plants more vigorous and productive. It’s an attempt to capitalize on a phenomenon that scientists are still trying to fully understand: that the growth of food crops and other plants is heavily influenced not only by their own genetic codes, but by microbes that live in the plants’ stems and roots and in the soil around them.

Supported ByDescription: Little Leaf Farms

“We think this is an area of science that’s going to be applicable to every one of the quadrillion seeds that gets planted” every year across the world, von Maltzahn says. Soil microbes even offer a solution to climate change, he says, because they could supercharge agricultural practices that suck carbon dioxide out of the air and bury it in farmland soil. These microorganisms might improve the health and vitality of cover crops, which are planted in cycles between cash crops like corn, or they might themselves increase the amount of carbon dioxide that gets deposited in the soil by plants.

Over eons, plants and microbes have evolved mutually beneficial partnerships that have become an appealing target for biotechnology researchers.

Starting in 2014, Indigo scientists and their collaborators began seeking out plants that were mysteriously thriving under conditions of drought, disease, or nutrient deficiency that killed neighboring plants. The team sampled the microbes living inside these super-survivor plants, coaxed those microbes to grow in a lab, and then tested what happened when they applied them to plants in greenhouses. Now the company sells seeds coated in these beneficial bacteria and fungi.

Description: Cotton seeds coated in beneficial bacteria and fungi.INDIGOCotton seeds coated in beneficial bacteria and fungi.

Indigo’s first product, released in 2016, was designed to help cotton tolerate drought. There are now more for other crops; Indigo says that as a group they boost yields by upwards of 5 percent. The company says its various microbial products have been used on 4 million acres of crops worldwide.

Investors are buying into this vision. Indigo Ag has raised roughly $850 million, making it the biggest and best-capitalized of dozens of startups developing microbes to address agricultural needs. (Indigo is also expanding beyond microbe mixes. The company provides a wide range of data analysis and technical consulting services to farmers.)

Several other ag-tech companies are hacking the best known natural relationship between plants and microbes. That’s the one in which bacteria provide essential nitrogen fuel for hungry plants. Inside the roots of legume plants like beans and peas, resident microbes suck nitrogen gas out of the air and convert it into a form plants can actually use. In return, plants feed those “nitrogen-fixing” bacteria with sugar.

Microbes that could do the same trick for corn, wheat, and rice could address a big problem in farming. Today, farmers feed these row crops with commercial fertilizer, which is synthesized from natural gas using massive amounts of energy.

Synthetic nitrogen fertilizer enables the eye-popping productivity of modern agriculture, where an acre of land now yields three times more corn than it did in the 1950s. It also uses about 1 percent of the entire world’s annual energy supply, and accounts for about 1 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions.

Farmers dump as much as 160 pounds of nitrogen per acre on their cornfields each year, because a lot washes away in rainstorms. That nitrogen runoff contaminates streams and rivers, causing nasty green slicks of algae that kill aquatic life. More nitrogen drifts off the fields as gas into the atmosphere, where it creates ozone pollution and accelerates global warming.

The idea of reducing the use of synthetic fertilizer by repurposing natural nitrogen-fixing bacteria is decades old. But the first wave of bacterial sprays that could be applied to fields — ”bugs in a jug” — weren’t too impressive, says farmer Jack Boyer, a retired engineer who grows corn, seed corn, soy, and cereal rye in Reinbeck, Iowa, and experiments with farming techniques. “The products that I have tried, I saw zero success,” he says. He’s had more success enriching his soil with cover crops planted in between cycles of cash crops.

But ag-tech companies are now using the tools of synthetic biology to create more effective organisms that can provide a consistent product. At the Berkeley, Calif.-based Pivot Bio, scientists began in 2011 by identifying microbes that have nitrogen-fixing genes that are currently inactive. By editing the DNA that regulates how these genes function, they figured out how to restart this dormant ability. The team then put those microbes into a product that is shelf-stable and cost-effective for farmers to spray on their fields during planting.

The resulting product, Proven, was launched for corn in 2019, promising to deliver 25 pounds of nitrogen per acre over the growing season and allowing farmers to reduce their applications of synthetic nitrogen. Nine field tests conducted last year by university partners showed an average increase of six bushels per acre when compared against fields without the boost.

This year, farmers are using Proven on hundreds of thousands of acres of corn, says Pivot Bio co-founder Karsten Temme. It sold out for the season. “We’re trying to make sure we can scale our supply chain to meet the demand, because it’s beyond our wildest expectations,” he says.

Joyn, a joint venture between Bayer and the Boston-based genetic engineering company Ginkgo Bioworks, is still in the early phases of its long-range plan: developing high-performance microbes that can be customized into a range of niche products by adding or modifying genes. Rather than genetically modifying the crops themselves, the idea is to engineer the bacteria that help them along. Joyn’s CEO, Michael Miille, envisions some that take nitrogen from the air, others that produce compounds that suppress weeds or pests, and still more than boost plant health in other ways.

Joyn is hoping to start field trials next spring, but likely won’t have a commercial product for at least four years. The dream of fully modular microbes may take a decade or more. “There’s no question that the need is there,” he says. “Ag needs innovation and new approaches.”

It’s still not clear, however, that microbes will deliver consistent cost-effective benefits on a commercial scale, and win over farmers who may be resistant to gambling on a new type of product. There’s little independent research to back up the claims made by Pivot and Indigo.

Boyer, the Iowa farmer, is open to giving it another try, as long as the price is right. “Farmers are interested in the environment too,” he says. “If you can do it — and make a living — they’re interested in doing it. "

Kat McGowan is a journalist in California who covers health, medicine, and science. Follow her on Twitter @mcgowankat.

https://apps.bostonglobe.com/ideas/graphics/2020/07/the-future-of-food/articles/agricultures-extremely-tiny-saviors/

 

Philippines stops purchase of rice after Vietnam resumes exports

Created: Thursday, 16 July 2020 12:55

The Philippine has dropped a plan to import up to 300,000 tonnes of rice from governments

Description: Vietnam Philippines riceVietnam resumed its rice exports from May after a brief suspension due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Image source: Peggy und Marco Lachmann-Anke/Pixabay)

The decision comes after Vietnam, the main rice supplier of the Philippine, has resumed selling grains.

As reported in the Reuters, the Philippines had planned to import under a government-to-government scheme.

Philippine International Trading Corp (PITC) issued a tender to import 25 per cent broken, well-milled long grain white rice, with bids from India, Thailand, Vietnam and Myanmar opened on 8 June.

Myanmar tops with an offer of US$489.25 per tonne for a volume of 33,000 tonnes and US$494.25 per tonne for a separate volume of 42,000 tonnes on the basis of ranking qualified bids, the cource added.

According to the source, other bids including those from India and Thailand were rejected.

Vietnam resumed its rice exports from May after a brief suspension due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Philippines imports around seven per cent to 14 per cent of its rice requirements, with 90 per cent coming from its southeast Asia neighbours.

http://www.fareasternagriculture.com/technology/infrastructure/philippines-stops-purchase-of-rice-after-vietnam-resumes-exports

https://thefinancialexpress.com.bd/editorial/duty-cut-on-rice-import-to-hit-next-harvest-1594915239

 

 

4 millers booked for Rs 14cr paddy scam

·         Posted: Jul 17, 2020 07:04 AM (IST)

Description: 4 millers booked for Rs 14cr paddy scam

Tribune News Service

Moga, July 16

An alleged paddy scam worth Rs 14-crore has come to the fore at Baghapurana city in the district.

Owners of three rice mills — Akshit Agro Food, Surya Agro Food and Keshav Agro Food — have collectively siphoned off paddy, which was allotted to them by Pungrain.

Food and Civil Supplies Controller (DFSC) Sartaj Singh said 9.56 lakh bags of paddy were allotted to these rice mills by Pungrain, but during initial physical verification, at least 1.24 lakh bags were found missing from the stock.

An FIR has been registered against the rice millers and their anticipatory bail have been rejected by the District and Sessions Court.

https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/punjab/4-millers-booked-for-rs-14cr-paddy-scam-113933

 

UC RICE BLOG

Weedy Rice Survey 2020

·         Author: Whitney Brim-DeForest

Published on: July 16, 2020

California Rice Production

 

UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

 

Weedy rice in a rice field in California.

The UCCE Rice Team will be starting a survey of weedy rice across the rice-growing counties in the next week. We are surveying fields that are known to have weedy rice infestations (from reports from the past 3 years). We will use this opportunity to update the extent of the infestation, collect samples, and pull out as many weedy rice plants as possible (from fields that have low infestations). 

If you are a grower or PCA with a field that has had an infestation in the past, we will be reaching out to you to let you know when we will be visiting. 

A big thank you to the California Rice Commission for providing the funding for this survey. For more information about weedy rice in California, visit caweedyrice.com

For questions regarding the survey, feel free to reach out to Luis Espino (laespino@ucanr.edu), Whitney Brim-DeForest (wbrimdeforest@ucanr.edu), or Michelle Leinfelder-Miles (mmleinfeldermiles@ucanr.edu). 

Public Value: UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Tags: Rice (15), weed identification (2), Weeds Affecting Plants (4), weedy rice (5)

Comments: 0


Mid Season Disease Update

·         Author: Luis Espino

Published on: July 10, 2020

There are a couple of interesting issues I have noticed while looking at fields, mostly in the northern part of the valley. One is bakanae. Bakanae is a seed borne disease that is managed by soaking the seed in sodium hypochlorite or bleach. Levels are very low and is not going to affect yield. Affected plants are taller than the rest, tend to be lighter green and chlorotic. The tell sign that the problem is bakanae is the rotting of the crown. Affected plants will die before producing a panicle or will produce a blanked panicle.

Another interesting issue I found is young plants affected by aggregate sheath spot. Usually I don't see this disease being severe this early, but in this field a large patch seemed affected.

 

Young plant affected by aggregate sheath spot

 

Area affected by aggregate sheath spot. Notice the yellow leaves near the water.

I have heard blast is present in the Willows and Maxwell areas, but I have not seen any yet. Usually, a tell sign of leaf blast is burned circular areas near headlands, where N overlaps are. But make sure to inspect closely. In one field, the dead circles were not caused by blast, but most likely by rats or muskrats that had cut the rice and created a sort of nest. 

 

Burned area caused by blast

 

Circular area damaged by rodents

 

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UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

New Rice Factsheets Available

·         Author: Whitney Brim-DeForest

Published on: July 6, 2020

 

Fact Sheet #2: Managing Potassium in Rice Fields

The UCCE Rice Team has developed a series of Factsheets to simplify and convey information about important topics that we find we are frequently discussing with growers and PCA's. Each fact sheet is 2 pages long, back to front.

There are 6 so far:

·  Fact Sheet #1: Nutrients in Rice Grain and Straw at Harvest

·  Fact Sheet #2: Managing Potassium in Rice Fields

·  Fact Sheet #3: Stem Rot and Aggregate Sheath Spot of Rice

·  Fact Sheet #4: Kernel Smut of Rice

·  Fact Sheet #5: Growing Season Water Use in California Rice Systems

·  Fact Sheet #6: Managing Rice with Limited Water

We are continuously in the process of developing more topics, so if you have suggestions, please reach out to Luis Espino (laespino@ucanr.edu) or Whitney Brim-DeForest (wbrimdeforest@ucanr.edu).

Public Value: UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Comments: 0


UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

New California Rice Herbicide Available in 2020: RebelEX®

·         Author: Whitney Brim-DeForest

·         Author: Roberta Firoved

Published on: June 24, 2020

Description: Rice field in Butte County, CA.

A new herbicide is available this year for use in California rice: RebelEX®, manufactured by Corteva. It is a premix of two other well-known herbicides: Clincher® and Granite SC®, both from Corteva. The active ingredients in RebelEX® are cyhalofop (same as Clincher®) and penoxsulam (same as Granite SC®). Since it contains cyhalofop, it is important to check with your respective counties on the buffer zones and aerial application restrictions for Clincher®, as the same permit conditions will apply.

The labeled weeds that RebelEX®controls are sprangletop, watergrass (both early and late), barnyardgrass, ricefield bulrush, Monochoria, redstem, ducksalad, California arrowhead, and water plantain. It does not have a water-holding period. The application timing begins from when the rice has one leaf or more, up to 60 days before harvest. Efficacy, as with most products, is better when the weeds are smaller. For flooded fields, it is important to have maximum contact, so it is recommended to lower the water in the field until at least 70% of the weed biomass is exposed, before application.

The product is “rainfast” (meaning it isn't affected by water) within 2 hours, so reflooding quickly is recommended. The label recommends restarting the flood at 3 hours after application, and to have the field completely reflooded within 24 to 48 hours at a maximum. Long drainage periods can encourage additional germination of certain weed species, including smallflower umbrella sedge, watergrass, barnyardgrass, and sprangletop.

Since RebelEX® also contains penoxsulam, it cannot be applied in the same season as Granite GR® or Granite SC®. Doing so will cause significant phytotoxicity to the rice, and will likely impact yields. Clincher® can be applied in the same season, but depending on the rate of RebelEX® applied, the Clincher® application rates will vary, so please refer to the label for rates and timings if planning to also apply both herbicides in the same season. For management of resistance, however, it is not recommended to apply Clincher® and RebelEx® in the same season, as both contain the same active ingredient, cyhalofop. Repeated applications of the same active ingredient (cyhalofop) will select for resistance in sprangletop, barnyardgrass, and watergrass (both late and early).

Remember to always follow all label instructions when applying any pesticide, as the label is the law. Make sure to pay particular attention to the Use Precautions and Restrictions. Consult your local Agricultural Commissioner's Office regarding buffer zones and aerial restrictions, before making any applications.

Label and SDS: https://www.corteva.us/products-and-solutions/crop-protection/rebelex-ca.html  

Public Value: UCANR: Safeguarding abundant and healthy food for all Californians

Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Tags: Pesticides (1), Rice (15), Weeds (19)

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Cerano herbicide damage on M-206 vs. M-105

·         Author: Bruce Linquist

Published on: June 18, 2020

 

 

This year we are conducting a study at the Rice Experiment Station to look at lodging differences between M-206 and M-105. There has been anecdotal evidence that M105 is more susceptible to lodging than M-206. We want to quantify this and see if we can manage N to reduce lodging if need be. Anyways, with this experiment, we have both of these varieties side-by-side in experimental plots. We used Cerano as part of the herbicide program. You can  clearly see from the picture  that M-206 is more susceptible to Cerano bleaching than M-105. Ray talked with Kent McKenzie about this and he also said he had seen similar findings. Anyway, we thought this might be interesting information for you. 

 

Ballots Out for California Rice Commission Major Amendment

 JULY 16, 2020 AGRI-BUSINESS FIELD & ROW CROPS RADIO REPORTS

Description: California Rice Commission

Rice industry members have until August 3 to cast their vote on a California Rice Commission (CRC) major amendment. The California Department of Food and Agriculture has mailed out a second round of ballots to all growers and handlers who have yet to return the first ballot.If the minimum number of ballots are not returned, the vote is invalid and will have to be repeated. Fifth-generation farmer and CRC Chair, Sean Doherty explains what the proposed amendment aims to achieve.

Listen to the radio report below.

http://agnetwest.com/ballots-out-for-california-rice-commission-major-amendment/

Traveling to the Middle East in a bite

 

By: Sandy Daza    

 Inquirer Lifestyle / 05:15 AM July 16, 2020

 

READING

TRAVELING TO THE MIDDLE EAST IN A BITE

 

Description: https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/files/2020/07/Lifestyle62235-1170x585.jpg

The Lamb Lahem, a platter of spicy fried basmati rice with peanuts and raisins topped with chunks of tender lamb —SANDY DAZA

 

Every time I have to work or go far, I see it as a blessing. I do what I have to do, but find a new place to dine in or simply go back to a place that gave me a memorable meal.

Last Friday, I had to go to the main office of the National Bureau of Investigation on Taft Avenue. Far, but my thought was already on where to dine.

Description: https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/files/2020/07/Lifestyle62235.jpgThe ones crossing my mind were Emerald Garden on Roxas Boulevard, Ongpin Street to find a dining place and walk around or, on the way back, Banawe. When I was almost done with my business, I remembered Salas Street in Mabini. That Middle Eastern restaurant, Shawarma Snack Center.

Decades ago, I would drive there alone and would get rattled at what I’d see and eat. There were roast Middle Eastern chicken, all sorts of wraps like beef, chicken and even lamb, pots of cooked food all emitting the beautiful aroma of spices, and a huge vat of yellow basmati rice topped with chunks of roast lamb! What do I choose?

Many times, I’m asked, what are you having for lunch? My answer is always, “Depends on what I feel like having then.” This was it!

There were two restaurants before, one across from each other. The other one is gone. As I sat and looked at the menu, confusion again. I didn’t know what to get. In cases like these, I ask the server what the best sellers are.

Mixed grill

I ended up with a mixed grill of beef chunks, spice-infused ground beef and chicken. All these were grilled on top of buttered dry and loose basmati rice.

On the table were bottles of chili sauce and garlic sauce. I poured some over the rice and meat, boom! I was already thinking of what I’d come back for. I took home some wrapped sandwiches for my kids, and they loved every bite.

Two days after, I was looking forward to going back. It was a Sunday and no traffic. In my post on Instagram, someone told me about a lentil soup.

So, this time I had a platter called Lamb Lahem. It included lentil soup, mixed pickles and a platter of spicy fried basmati rice with peanuts and raisins. On top were chunks of tender, melt-in-your-mouth lamb. I squeezed some white garlic sauce and spicy sauce all over and simply traveled to the Middle East! It was so, so good. I was just talking to myself thinking of what I could bring home to my kids. Outstanding!

I will go back for the roast chicken. They have party platters. They can have a whole roast of chicken, beef or lamb with all the sidings of pita bread, or one we used to get: a huge platter of flavored basmati rice topped with roast lamb. That always was a party hit.

I hardly eat rice. That didn’t happen here. It was that good.

Beside them is a store selling Middle Eastern stuff. I got pita bread which I used when I cooked Mexican tacos at home. Yummy! I also took home some dates. Also very good. Last Sunday, I bought a pack of super salty goat cheese. I know how to reduce the saltiness. I’ll slice it thinly, fry and put it on toasted pan de sal.

Shawarma Snack Center, 484 R. Salas St., Ermita, Manila; tel. 85212121, 85244409

 https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/366332/traveling-to-the-middle-east-in-a-bite/#ixzz6SRu7FbRs@inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

Rice purchases for national reserves to be completed by mid-August

15:32 | 16/07/2020

The General Department of State Reserves GDSR is set to complete this year purchasing of rice for national food reserves by August 15

Description: rice purchases for national reserves to be completed by mid august

GDSR General Director Do Viet Duc said that, as of July 10, the agency had purchased 158,880 tonnes of husked rice and 60,200 tonnes of unhusked grain, equivalent to 83.5% and 75% of the respective targets for 2020.

It has strived to address the difficulties to ramp up food purchases for the national reserves at the Prime Minister’s request, so as to stay ready to perform tasks when necessary, he noted.

During the first half of this year, amid the COVID-19 outbreak, the GDSR worked with ministries and sectors to distribute food and other supplies worth over VND1 trillion (US$43.4 million) from national reserves to support frontline forces in fighting the disease and helping those affected stabilise their lives.

Source: VNA

english.vov.vn

https://customsnews.vn/rice-purchases-for-national-reserves-to-be-completed-by-mid-august-15221.html

 

IRRI focuses on resilience to tackle economic shocks

 Tribune Desk

·       Published at 06:35 pm July 16th, 2020

Description: web-rice-paddy

Varieties of rice sample in a shop Mehedi Hasan/Dhaka Tribune

With this motto in front, IRRI, the rice research organization launched its annual report for 2019

As countries continue to grapple with the realities of pandemics, climate change, increasing poverty and hunger, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) stands ready to ensure the sustainability of the global rice sector, which provides food for half the world’s people.

With this motto in front, IRRI, the rice research organization launched its annual report for 2019, said a press release.

Titled “Race for Impact”, the report is a compilation of IRRI’s cumulative work that focused on making the rice sector more climate-resilient and sustainable for the benefit of smallholder farmers, women, and youth.

It features initiatives to provide lasting contributions to the SGDs and to national development plans including implementation of local evidence hubs, high-impact technological innovations, opening an African regional center of leadership for rice, and forging an international partnership with other CGIAR Centers to drive food systems transformations in Asia.

“The transformation of the global food systems is an immense but imperative goal of delivering healthier diets without exhausting the world’s resources. Making this happen requires restructuring agricultural priorities where the top priority is producing healthier foods for balanced diets rather than producing cheap foods,” said Matthew Morell, director general of IRRI.

Transforming the world’s rice-based agri-food systems and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are no small challenges.

In these crucial times, IRRI is focused on bolstering the resilience of the global rice sector against economic shocks, the report outlines.

“We have recently launched Research-for-Development agenda in five key areas: Climate Change, Environment, Social Equity, Prosperity, and Nutrition and Food Security. These will help us streamline and refocus our work around the SDGs,” said Dr Humnath Bhandari, IRRI country representative for Bangladesh.

The International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) is the world’s premier research organization dedicated to reducing poverty and hunger through rice science; improving the health and welfare of rice farmers and consumers; and protecting the rice-growing environment for future generations.

It is an independent, nonprofit, research and educational institute, founded in 1960 by the Ford and Rockefeller foundations with support from the Philippine government.

The institute, headquartered in Los Baños, Philippines, has offices in 17 rice-growing countries in Asia and Africa, and more than 1,000 staff.

https://www.dhakatribune.com/business/2020/07/16/irri-focuses-on-resilience-to-tackle-economic-shocks

 

Rice Crop 2020: Louisiana’s poised to see record yield

LOCAL NEWS

Posted:  Updated: 

RICHALND PARISH, La. (KTVE/KARD) — (07/15/20) 2020 looks to be the year for rice in Louisiana as the crop continues to head down the road to a bumper crop. Northeast Louisiana is playing a huge part in making this happen.

“The market was significantly better in relation to the other crops we grow, I think that’s why a lot of rice got planted. But, long term, the new technologies and new growing systems in rice really gives the farmer a much bigger playbook” Scott Franklin, President of the Northeast Louisiana Rice Growers Association said.

This includes Furrow Irrigation, or Row Rice, as well as Alternate Wetting and Drying, which makes the growing process more environmentally and economically beneficial. This left the state with 450,000 acres of rice this year, as opposed to the average 400,000 acres.

“And almost all of that increase is attributed to the Northeast portion of the state.” Franklin said.

This method has been in practice the area for a while, but hasn’t been insured until this year after Congressman Ralph Abraham made the insurance possible.

“Technically it was not insurable under federal crop insurance guidelines. That gave a lot of farmers the chance to become rice growers” Franklin said.

Farmers also did not have to worry about flooded fields this year, as they had enough time in between rain and dry spells.

“The timely rains have been very beneficial to the rice crop.” Franklin said.

Local rice farmers are saying that the combination of these factors could lead to a record farming year for rice in Louisiana, which is great for NELA’s and the state’s economy.

“I think it’s one of the best rice crops we’ve ever had in the state of Louisiana. It’s dried here, it’s milled here so those dollars turn over, about seven and a half times the actual dollar value of the rice.” Franklin said.

Farmers are hoping excessive rainfall can hold off until harvest time, which for Northeast Louisiana is around the middle of August. Until then, they won’t know if the crop officially broke any yield records.

https://www.myarklamiss.com/news/local-news/rice-crop-2020-louisianas-poised-to-see-record-yield/



Rice Crop 2020: Louisiana’s poised to see record yield

LOCAL NEWS

Posted:  Updated: 

RICHALND PARISH, La. (KTVE/KARD) — (07/15/20) 2020 looks to be the year for rice in Louisiana as the crop continues to head down the road to a bumper crop. Northeast Louisiana is playing a huge part in making this happen.

“The market was significantly better in relation to the other crops we grow, I think that’s why a lot of rice got planted. But, long term, the new technologies and new growing systems in rice really gives the farmer a much bigger playbook” Scott Franklin, President of the Northeast Louisiana Rice Growers Association said.

This includes Furrow Irrigation, or Row Rice, as well as Alternate Wetting and Drying, which makes the growing process more environmentally and economically beneficial. This left the state with 450,000 acres of rice this year, as opposed to the average 400,000 acres.

“And almost all of that increase is attributed to the Northeast portion of the state.” Franklin said.

This method has been in practice the area for a while, but hasn’t been insured until this year after Congressman Ralph Abraham made the insurance possible.

“Technically it was not insurable under federal crop insurance guidelines. That gave a lot of farmers the chance to become rice growers” Franklin said.

Farmers also did not have to worry about flooded fields this year, as they had enough time in between rain and dry spells.

“The timely rains have been very beneficial to the rice crop.” Franklin said.

Local rice farmers are saying that the combination of these factors could lead to a record farming year for rice in Louisiana, which is great for NELA’s and the state’s economy.

“I think it’s one of the best rice crops we’ve ever had in the state of Louisiana. It’s dried here, it’s milled here so those dollars turn over, about seven and a half times the actual dollar value of the rice.” Franklin said.

Farmers are hoping excessive rainfall can hold off until harvest time, which for Northeast Louisiana is around the middle of August. Until then, they won’t know if the crop officially broke any yield records.

https://www.myarklamiss.com/news/local-news/rice-crop-2020-louisianas-poised-to-see-record-yield/

Explained: Why MP’s push for inclusion into the GI list of Basmati can hurt India globally

India stands tall in the global arena as the only producer of premium Basmati. No other country (other than 18 districts of Pakistan) can call any of its rice as ‘Basmati’.

·        

·        

·        

Written by Anju Agnihotri Chaba | Jalandhar | Published: July 17, 2020 12:31:05 pm

Basmati rice at Punjab’s Khanna mandi. (Express Photo: Jasbir Malhi)

Following Madhya Pradesh (MP) government’s pressure on the central government for seeking Geographical Indication (GI) tag for Basmati produced in 13 districts of MP, the All India Rice Exporters’ Association (AIREA) has appealed to the government to preserve and protect the integrity of one of the most cherished national produce of India — Basmati rice.

India stands tall in the global arena as the only producer of premium Basmati. No other country (other than 18 districts of Pakistan) can call any of its rice as ‘Basmati’. AIREA argues that if MP is included in the GI list of Basmati crop then it will not only harm the reputation of Indian Basmati as a whole, but also the national interest. The Indian Express explains what MP’s demand really means:

What is GI?

According to the Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA), it is an agricultural, natural or a manufactured product, originating from a specific geographical area due to which it possesses unique characteristics and qualities. GI tag is basically an assurance that the product is coming from that specific area. It’s kind of trademark in the international market.

When was Basmati brought under GI tag and which is the area where GI tag is applicable to the Basmati?

In May 2010, APEDA, a statutory body under the Ministry of Commerce, got this certification for the region located in Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) below the foothills of the Himalayas, spread across seven states — Himachal Pradesh, J&K, Punjab, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Western UP (26 districts) and Delhi.

According to APEDA, the origin and reputation of Basmati rice as a ‘long grain, aromatic rice’ from the IGP is found in tradition, folklore, scientific and culinary literature and political and historical records. They said Dehraduni Basmati, Amritsar Basmati and Tarawari basmati all have not become famous in one day as they are producing Basmati for hundreds of years.

When MP does not fall in IGP, then why does it want its rice to be included under the GI list?

MP falls in the Madhya Bharat Pathar and started cultivation of varieties of Basmati rice only around the middle of the first decade of this century. The state claims that this rice possesses the same characteristics and qualities as that of the rice grown in the IGP. It also claims that nearly 80,000 farmers of the state are growing Basmati in 13 districts and exporting worth Rs 3,000 crore annually.

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Why MP cannot be included in GI Tag?

AIREA said that under WTO’s TRIPs (trade-related aspects of intellectual property rights) agreement, physical attributes are not enough for a product to earn GI tag and that reputation linked to the geographical region is essential and imperative. As per GI of Goods (Registration & Protection) Act in 2003, ‘reputation’ to a geographical area is central to the recognition of a GI product and only seven states have that reputation. Even if the rice grown in MP has all the required characteristics (or maybe even better than Basmati rice grown in the traditional growing areas), the same would not still entitle such rice to qualify as Basmati. Just like sparkling wine produced in Australia or California or Italy cannot be called Champagne and Kancheepuram Silk Sari is a GI product, but a Banarsi sari cannot claim a share of the status though it might be as beautiful as the Kancheepuram Sari. Same goes with Basmati and any rice which is grown outside the designated area cannot be called Basmati.

What efforts are being undertaken by the MP to grab the GI tag?

Apart from putting pressure on the Centre, MP has appealed in Madras High Court where its plea was rejected in February this year. Earlier too in 2016, Intellectual Properties Appellate Board (IPBA) in Chennai had given the decision in favour of the APEDA, which is not in favour of including MP in the GI list. Despite these orders, MP has been repeatedly agitating and raising banter through political and bureaucratic channels, and even many traders from MP are selling the rice from MP using the IGP imagery on their packages – through MP is far away down south of the IGP, said AIREA.

https://indianexpress.com/article/explained/basmati-rice-geographical-indication-tag/

 

Cambodia’s rice market to have growing importance in global rice supplies, says OECD-FAO

Sai Da / AKP 

Cambodian rice to have major impact in global supplies. Photo supplied

 

A medium-term outlook for agriculture released Thursday forecast that Cambodia would play an increasingly important role in the global market for rice exports.

Launched in Paris, the joint report by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) covers the 10-year period from 2020 to 2029.

“India, Thailand, Viet Nam, and Pakistan will remain the leading global suppliers of rice,” the report said.

“But Cambodia and Myanmar are expected to play an increasingly important role in global rice exports.”

The OECD and FAO expect rice shipments by Cambodia and Myanmar to almost double from an estimated four million tonnes this year to seven million tonnes by 2029.

In addition, the report forecast that Cambodia — along with Bangladesh, Laos and Myanmar — would continue to increase productivity by adopting higher-yield varieties and better agricultural practices.

Annual global growth in rice trade is projected to be 2.8 percent over the period, with volumes increasing by 15 million tonnes from 2020 to 62 million tonnes in 2029.

“India is expected to remain the world’s largest rice exporter,” the report said.

“Thailand, where shipments have traditionally been largely composed of higher quality rice, is expected to remain the second largest rice exporter.

“In Viet Nam, expected growth is partly linked to ongoing efforts to diversify the varietal make-up of the country’s rice shipments.”

But the top five exporters – India, Thailand, Viet Nam, Pakistan and the United States – “are expected to see their export shares reduced slightly compared to the past decade.

“This reflects expectations of Chinese shipments remaining well over the lows seen between 2010-2016, albeit at a somewhat lower level than recorded in 2019.

“Moreover, amid expectations of large exportable surpluses, shipments by Cambodia and Myanmar are expected to continue making headway,” the report said.

https://www.khmertimeskh.com/50745569/cambodias-rice-market-to-have-growing-importance-in-global-rice-supplies-says-oecd-fao/

 In Memory:  Dennis Leonards 


USA Rice extends condolences to the family and friends of Dennis Louis Leonards, who passed away July 13, at the age of 84.  He is survived by his wife, Phyllis, seven children, 17 grandchildren, and 9 great-grandchildren.

Honored in the farming community on both local and national levels, Dennis was named Farmer of the Year in 1992 in the very first edition of Rice Farming Magazine.  In 1995, he was the International Rice Festival Farmer of the Year, and in 1999 he was named Farmer of the Year at the National Conservation Tillage Cotton and Rice Conference.  Dennis was a pioneer in conservation tillage of rice, now a widely used and accepted practice.  

"We grew up farming next to Mr. Leonards, and to me, he was someone you could look up to, not only as a farmer, but as a husband and father to his family, as well as a father figure and friend to us all," said Bryan "Buck" Leonards, a fellow rice farmer from Acadia Parish.  "He was an integral part of our community, a respected leader in the rice industry, known for his community and church involvement, and a fixture at our local festivals.  From the International Rice Festival to the Germanfest at Roberts Cove, he made sure the history of early rice farming was preserved and shared with the younger generation through the thrashing demonstrations he led each year.  He will be truly missed, but his legacy and knowledge will carry on through his sons and the many lives he touched, including mine."
Description: C:\Users\abc\Downloads\unnamed (3).jpg

Due to current COVID social distancing restrictions, there will be a private visitation for immediate family only.  However, the family requests that you join them Monday evening at 6 p.m. in praying the rosary from your homes.  Burial will be in St. Leo Cemetery in Roberts Cove, Louisiana, following the Mass of Christian Burial.

 

 

 

 

 

Annual U.S.-Japan Rice Technical Meeting Goes On, Virtually  

By Peter Bachmann

 

SACRAMENTO, CA -- COVID-19 travel restrictions forced the 23rd annual U.S.-Japan rice technical meeting into cyberspace for the first time ever.  Exporters from the U.S. and importers from Japan participated in the video conference, which, despite the distances between participants still yielded productive results. Description: C:\Users\abc\Downloads\unnamed (4).jpg

"This meeting continues to be an important part of maintaining smooth rice trade between the U.S. and Japan by providing us a forum to work through technical issues in a business-like manner," said Alex Balafoutis, chair of the U.S. delegation and executive vice president of Western Foods.

Meeting discussions tend to cover more technical, detailed information than can be found in typical government statistical reports and include rice supply and demand trends, export trends, and measures of quality control, among other things.

Balafoutis added: "While we had to adapt to make sure we still had the ability to provide timely presentations and get that face-to-face interaction, we are looking forward to returning to an in-person meeting format next year once travel restrictions are relaxed."

 

Description: https://ci6.googleusercontent.com/proxy/hGrq11JG9KecB2nG0ztsJdIJsShd70PcMwlY7vDILI7Fc7SBVfbbc4wG_OUVaE6DKHnxEZLrHYsrLGiKl23tFIyxiTHqbeDSTQkpSvG9=s0-d-e1-ft#https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/sys/S.gif

 

 

 

Rice Crop 2020: Louisiana’s poised to see record yield

LOCAL NEWS

Posted: Jul 15, 2020 / 05:46 PM CDT Updated: Jul 16, 2020 / 09:35 AM CDT

RICHALND PARISH, La. (KTVE/KARD) — (07/15/20) 2020 looks to be the year for rice in Louisiana as the crop continues to head down the road to a bumper crop. Northeast Louisiana is playing a huge part in making this happen.

“The market was significantly better in relation to the other crops we grow, I think that’s why a lot of rice got planted. But, long term, the new technologies and new growing systems in rice really gives the farmer a much bigger playbook” Scott Franklin, President of the Northeast Louisiana Rice Growers Association said.

This includes Furrow Irrigation, or Row Rice, as well as Alternate Wetting and Drying, which makes the growing process more environmentally and economically beneficial. This left the state with 450,000 acres of rice this year, as opposed to the average 400,000 acres.

“And almost all of that increase is attributed to the Northeast portion of the state.” Franklin said.

This method has been in practice the area for a while, but hasn’t been insured until this year after Congressman Ralph Abraham made the insurance possible.

“Technically it was not insurable under federal crop insurance guidelines. That gave a lot of farmers the chance to become rice growers” Franklin said.

Farmers also did not have to worry about flooded fields this year, as they had enough time in between rain and dry spells.

“The timely rains have been very beneficial to the rice crop.” Franklin said.

Local rice farmers are saying that the combination of these factors could lead to a record farming year for rice in Louisiana, which is great for NELA’s and the state’s economy.

“I think it’s one of the best rice crops we’ve ever had in the state of Louisiana. It’s dried here, it’s milled here so those dollars turn over, about seven and a half times the actual dollar value of the rice.” Franklin said.

Farmers are hoping excessive rainfall can hold off until harvest time, which for Northeast Louisiana is around the middle of August. Until then, they won’t know if the crop officially broke any yield records.

https://www.myarklamiss.com/news/local-news/rice-crop-2020-louisianas-poised-to-see-record-yield/

 

 

Traders’ body urges Centre for a new policy to promote non-basmati rice exports

Rahul Wadke  Mumbai | Updated on July 15, 2020  Published on July 15, 2020

Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/6lrdsd/article32086468.ece/alternates/WIDE_615/BL15RICE

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Traders’ body urges Centre for a new policy to promote non-basmati rice exports

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The Federation of Association of Maharashtra ( FAM) has written to the Union Agriculture Ministry asking for a new policy which will promote non-basmati rice in the export market. FAM has said that the export volumes of basmati has stagnated and non-basmati varieties are losing ground to cheaper varieties from China, Indonesia and Vietnam.

FAM is one of the largest organised bodies of traders, merchants and entrepreneurs in the country.

Losing on exports

Rajesh Shah, Senior Vice-President of FAM, told BusinessLine that in the last 3-4 years the volumes of basmati rice exports have been maintained but in other varieties the volumes have dipping. For 2018-19, about 44.10 lakh tonnes (lt) of basmati was exported and in 2019-20 only a marginal rise of 44.50 lt were shipped. But the non-basmati varieties export market, which was at 75.34 lt in 2018-19, has dropped to 50.35 lt in 2019-20.

Shah said that FAM has written to the Centre that the African and Europe markets have started moving and importing the cheaper Chinese and Vietnamese varieties. The Indian farmers and traders are losing their markets. Basmati brands are already established and the world has no other option but to come to India and Pakistan, while for non-basmati varieties a lot options exist.

It must also be noted that our farmers also produce fragrant and high quality varieties such as Ambemohar, Sona masoori and Indrayani. These should be promoted by the Government in international markets through exhibitions and other promotional activities. Exports of these three varieties will help maintain market volumes internationally, he said.

 

He added that acreages of these three varieties also must increase, which will provide assured prices to the farmers.

Published on July 15, 2020

https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/traders-body-urges-centre-for-a-new-policy-to-promote-non-basmati-rice-exports/article32086469.ece

BEPA Seals 100 Rice Mills In-violation Of Environment Laws

  

Balochistan Environmental Protection Agency (BEPA) has sealed 100 unauthorized rice mills in the province for violating the environment laws

ISLAMABAD, (APP - UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News - 16th Jul, 2020 ) :Balochistan Environmental Protection Agency (BEPA) has sealed 100 unauthorized rice mills in the province for violating the environment laws.

The Director General BEPA issued orders to seal 10 illegal rice mills in Naseerabad district, 6 in Sohbatpur district and 84 in Jaffarabad district.

Talking to APP, an official of the EPA Muhammad Khan Utmankhail said "No one would be allowed to violate the Environment act 2012 and no concession would be given to the violators. Strict action will be taken against illegal factories without permission of the Environmental Protection Agency".

Muhammad Khan said that EPA has also imposed fines on dozens of industries across the province for polluting the environments and violating the laws.

In Pishin District 7 illegal crushing plants were sealed on the orders of Director General of EPA. The EPA has also banned 16 industries in Hub, two in Chaghi and one in Jafferabad district over polluting the environments.

The industries have been imposed Rs 50,000 each fine for violating the Environmental Protection Act 2012 and all the industries concerned were required to pay a fine within 15 days of the action, he added.

In case of non-payment, action will be taken under Balochistan Environmental Protection Agency Act 2012, he added.

He said that it is the duty of us to keep the environment clean and to protect the people.

Air pollution is a major problem which is causing dangerous diseases, he added.

https://www.urdupoint.com/en/pakistan/bepa-seals-100-rice-mills-in-violation-of-env-976413.html