Monday, November 20, 2017

20th November,2017 daily global regional local rice e-newsletter by riceplus magazine

Punjab, Haryana procure 240 lakh tonnes paddy


Chandigarh: Agrarian states Punjab and Haryana have procured nearly 240 lakh tonnes of paddy so far, Food and Supplies Department officials said here on Sunday.
Punjab has procured around 173 lakh tonnes and Haryana around 67 lakh tonnes, heading towards a record paddy procurement this season.
Government agencies have procured 98.5 per cent of the paddy arriving in the grain markets in Punjab and nearly 95 per cent in Haryana. The remaining paddy has been procured by rice millers and private traders.
Punjab is expecting a record procurement of over 182 lakh tonnes of paddy this year compared with over 168 lakh tonnes of the bumper crop last year.
Paddy arrival in Haryana is much higher than the over 62 lakh tonnes that arrived in the state’s grain markets in the corresponding period last year.
The procurement, which began in both states on October 1, will continue till November end.
The Reserve Bank of India has sanctioned over Rs 33,800 crore for paddy procurement in Punjab in this kharif season.


GI Registry to decide Basmati claim of Madhya Pradesh soon

U Sudhakar Reddy| TNN | Nov 19, 2017, 13:38 IST
HYDERABAD: After Rosagolla decision Geographical Indication Registry at Chennai has decided to deliver a verdict in next 15 days on Madhya Pradesh claim on the inclusion of certain districts of State in the Basmati rice GI tag.

The Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority of Ministry of Commerce and Industry was given GI tag in 2016 with the geographic area of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Delhi, Uttarakhand and Parts of Western Uttar Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir.

Chinnaraj G Naidu head of GI Registry in Chennai told TOI, "We will decide on Madhya Pradesh's claim of inclusion in next two weeks regarding Basmati rice," APEDA applied in 2008 and GI registry decided in its favour in 2016 with the geographical distribution of seven states. State of Madhya Pradesh in July 2017 has filed submission stating that Basmati rice is cultivated widely. It argued that State of Punjab was allowed to intervene in a late stage before issuing GI tag in 2016. Madya Kshetra Basmati Growers Association also applied in favour of inclusion of Madhya Pradesh.

All India Rice Exporters Association in August 2017 has filed an intervener petition against State of Madhya Pradesh that the State should not be given any time for filing additional evidence in support of their claim.

State of Punjab has also objected strongly to claim for the inclusion of State of Madhya Pradesh district in GI Basmati. Dr Ranvir Singh Gill of Punjab Agricultural University was quoted in Punjab rebuttal saying,"MP has never had any scientific or historical reputation of cultivating of Basmati let alone commercial cultivation. Any dilution of India pride may not only lead to very adverse effects on the livelihood of Basmati growing community in Punjab and other GI areas but also will have serious implication on Indian Economy as it will open gates not only for other States but other countries too."
Pakistan has been fighting for owning up Basmati as it's own. The application of APEDA was then opposed by
Basmati Growers Association of Lahore in Pakistan. However, BGA did not file its evidence in GI Registry within the period prescribed under the GI rules. Basmati rice is exported worth thousands of crores of business. Andhra and Telangana grow in fewer areas when compared to other seven states. No attempts were made by the Telugu States for inclusion.

Earlier in 2010, May 18 GI registry has rejected the application of The Heritage a society formed by farmers, traders, commission agents and millers of Karnal district of Haryana. GI registry then said Basmati rice being produced in at least six states of India and society apparently doesn't adequately represent the interest of all producers in other areas other than Karnal.


According to APEDA India is the leading exporter of the Basmati Rice to the global market. The country has exported 40,00,471.56 MT of Basmati Rice to the world for the worth of Rs. 21,604.58 crores during the year 2016-17.

Major Export Destinations for 2016-17 are Saudi Arabia, Iran, United Arab Emirates, Iraq and Kuwait.

The Basmati is cultivated in Kaikaluru, Kalidindi, Agiripalli, Bapulapadu and Nagayalanka of Krishna district.

Andhra and Telangana did not claim significant cultivation of Pusa 1509 variety in Karimnagar, Warragal of Telangana and East and West Godavari and Krishna districts of Andhra Pradesh.

According to APEDA the total basmati growing area in seven States came down by 7.92 percent to 1.56 million hectares in the 2017 Kharif season as compared to 1.69 mh previous years.

Basmati is predominantly grown in 81 districts in the countryhttps://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/gi-registry-to-decide-basmati-claim-of-madhya-pradesh-soon/articleshow/61710873.cms
Remote-sensing technology mitigates risks in agricultural production
VietNamNet Bridge - Accurate forecasts about rice and crop yields, as well as better monitoring of floods and natural calamities are needed to help policymakers come up with good solutions for agricultural production.


The data provided to farmers, businesses, insurance companies, policy makers and specialists remain limited, leading to high risks in production. Remote sensing technology would help reduce the risks.According to the National Institute of Agricultural Planning and Projection (NIAPP), remote sensing technology can replace the usual tools in monitoring agricultural production and give more reliable results.

In the past, Vietnam used statistical systems, which were time-consuming and led to big errors.

Remote sensing technology surveys larger areas, and gives results after shorter time and with higher accuracy. And the cost of using remote sensing technology is lower than traditional methods.
Remote sensing technology surveys larger areas, and gives results after shorter time and with higher accuracy. And the cost of using remote sensing technology is lower than traditional methods.
Pham Quang Ha from the Agriculture Planning Institute commented that remote sensing technology, with accurate results, helps in monitoring rice production that serves food production planning; assesses the damages caused by natural calamities; and insures agriculture production to ease risks for farmers.

It is also helpful in statistical work, food storage planning, and scientific research and teaching, and adaptation to climate change.

The recent historic floods led to rice crop failure in the north. The damages caused by the flood were serious, but farmers needed to give figures to prove the damages.

In this case, remote sensing technology would help them measure damages in districts, communes and rice fields. The information would be referred to by insurers and the state to calculate compensation levels and necessary financial support to help ease farmers’ difficulties.

NIAPP’s director Nguyen Quang Dung said with remote sensing technology, scientists use signals provided by satellites in 6-day or 12-day periods to determine the time when crops begin, then calculate the expected rice yield. The calculation method gives high accuracy level at 90-92 percent.

Experts said remote sensing technology, together with simulation and mapping technology, can help give information to forecast risks, which can be used by state management agencies to consider giving support to help farmers fix damages and by insurers to compensate farmers.

Marcel Reymond recommends the use of remote sensing technology in agriculture production and agriculture insurance.

He said in the near future, all farm produce must be insured, because agricultural production faces risk from natural calamities. And remote sensing technology will be helpful to both insured farmers and insurers.

“This technology will help provide accurate, timely and objective data on losses to rice production,” he explained. “It will also help insurance companies tackle a big problem – the high transaction costs in insurance programs targeting small-scale farming.”

http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/science-it/190271/remote-sensing-technology-mitigates-risks-in-agricultural-production.html

IRRI urges govt to increase rice output


NEIL ALCOBER, TMT ON NOVEMBER 18, 2017
THE Los Banos-based International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) has urged the Philippine government to increase the country’s rice production so prices of staple will go down.“The price of rice in the Philippines is slightly higher than [in]any other countries, so by increasing productivity we will be able to bring prices down,” Bruce Tolentino, deputy director general of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), told The Manila Times in an interview over the weekend.
“So they [rice farmers]don’t get harm by increased production because that usually results in lower prices. They will be protected because there’s not only increased production, there’s also improved quality which will maintain the price difference,” he explained, referring to the need for farmers to also improve the quality of the palay or unmilled rice.
The IRRI official also said the Philippine government must continue to invest in technological
http://www.manilatimes.net/irri-urges-govt-increase-rice-output/363734/

Pakistan's bustling economic activity tries to recover from ruins of terrorism

 19 NOVEMBER 2017, 10:00AM / DINEO FAKU

JOHANNESBURG - Pakistan is crazy about cricket. Beyond, cricket, the country is also a bustling economic activity trying to recover from the ruins of terrorism. 
Although the market has very little traction with South African corporations, Nandos, the much loved flame-grilled chicken outlet is one of the few local companies that has a presence in the south Asian country.
Post 1994, South Africa’s “Asian engagement has mainly been focused on Japan, China, India and Malaysia. Pakistan has never really featured. Perhaps because government agencies have not done much to promote the country. 
Trade between South Africa and Pakistan is below its full at $653 million. Coal comprises 75 percent of exports from South Africa followed by steel and iron ore at around 18 percent. Textile comprises 60 percent of imports from Pakistan to South Africa followed by leather at 10 percent and rice at 10 percent. Pakistani agriculture accounts for 19.53 percent of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). 
Motorcycles parked outside a bustling market in Pakistan. Image: Dineo Faku.
A source close to the Department of Trade and Industry says there are 75 types of mangoes in Pakistan which South African can import because seasons were different. Last week the Pakistani government hosted the tenth annual Emerging Pakistan initiative hosted at the Karachi Expo Centre in Karachi. Karachi is Pakistan’s  biggest city with a population of 20 million. 
There is no tavern here in line with Muslim law  (which frustrated some of the delegates). Over three-days, the Pakistan government told a different story from what is currently portrayed on global news networks including CNN and the BBC. The story was that it was rising from its troubles.
GDP is forecast to grow by 6 percent this year from 5.28 percent in the 2016-2017 financial year. 
Pakistan is expected to become the world’s 20th largest economy by 2030 and the 16th largest by 2050 based on results of previous years. It is also expected to be the world’s fastest-growing Islamic economy in 2017. This is no small feat considering that it was engulfed in turmoil a few years ago. Six years ago Al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden was killed by the US navy seals during a bloody shoot out that shocked the world in a compound in Abbottabad, as the war on terrorism continued. 
A bus travelling on the roads of Pakistan. Image: Dineo Faku.
The government says the phenomenon has cost the the country $68 billion in direct and indirect impact between 2000 and 2010. The army is always on the street - a reminder of the precarious situation that Pakistan still finds itself in. 
Even the 750 delegates from 85 different countries who attended the Emerging Pakistan initiative had to be under full time police escort. Snipers on top of buildings are a common site in the country. But the country wants to reclaim its national image and narrative and present it for what it truly is: positive and full of potential. 
Pakistan is building a brand that communicates the opportunities to a diverse audience that includes investors both international and local. Organisers says the attendance was double the size from last year.
A police vehicle in Pakistan. Image: Dineo Faku.
Some say Pakistan is on a charm offensive to upset its neighbour and rival India with a 1.2 billion population which has strong ties with Africa.
One thing that South Africa can learn from Pakistan is to take the future into its own hands. A widening trust deficit between business and the government means lost opportunities for trade.
https://www.iol.co.za/business-report/international/pakistans-bustling-economic-activity-tries-to-recover-from-ruins-of-terrorism-12051227
Home /

OPINION

Arkansas' Grand Prairie

This article was published November 19, 2017 at 1:51 a.m.
My mother was a native of the Arkansas Grand Prairie. She was born at Des Arc in 1925, two years before the Great Flood of 1927. That flood would inundate much of east Arkansas and bring hundreds of evacuees to live in tents in her hometown.
Rice already was an important crop on the Grand Prairie. Bill Hope had planted a plot as an experiment near Stuttgart in 1902. The results were good enough that other farmers followed his lead. The Stuttgart Rice Mill Co. was incorporated in March 1907 and was completed in October of that year, just in time for the harvest. It made a profit of $16,000.
In 1921, the farmers' cooperative that's now Riceland Foods Inc. was formed. By 1926, the year after my mother's birth, the University of Arkansas had placed its Rice Research and Extension Center at Stuttgart. With rice came ducks--millions of ducks. The world championhip duck calling contest, now part of Stuttgart's Wings Over the Prairie Festival, began in 1936 since duck hunters across the country already had come to consider the Grand Prairie as the mecca of their sport. In 1943, the year my mother graduated from high school, Producers Rice Mill was established at Stuttgart.
Duck season began in Arkansas on Saturday. Thanksgiving week marks the Wings Over the Prairie Festival. It's the time of year when Arkansans in all 75 counties read about and think about the Grand Prairie region and its rich culture.
I was raised in southwest Arkansas, but the Grand Prairie always has been a part of me because of my mother. She read the weekly White River Journal from Des Arc until she died at age 90 two years ago this week. My grandparents had lived into their 90s in their big house on Erwin Street in Des Arc. Thanksgiving, Christmas and large parts of my summers were spent there as a boy, soaking up the traditions of the region. Rice and gravy were always served at holiday meals rather than potatoes and gravy. And though my grandfather wasn't a hunter, he would trade items from his hardware store in downtown Des Arc for fat mallards to go with the cornbread dressing, turnip greens, peas and rice.
Unlike my grandfather, my father was a duck hunter, and I was fortunate that he would take me on Grand Prairie hunts as a boy. It was on a brutally cold November morning in 1976 near Stuttgart, in fact, when he killed three ducks with one shot. And they were three different types of ducks. I have a witness to that feat, my boyhood friend Trey Berry, now the president of Southern Arkansas University at Magnolia. We all know that a college president would never lie.
For many Arkansans, the day after Thanksgiving means leftovers and shopping. For our family, it meant the short trip from Des Arc to Stuttgart to watch the duck callers compete. The Grand Prairie is unique. I think not only of the ducks and the rice but of the Eastern European influences, the Tollville Turkey Fry, the Slovak Oyster Supper, the good fishing in the spring, the mosquitoes in the summer. I think of barbecue eaten at Craig's in DeValls Bluff, catfish consumed at Murry's near Hazen and the fine meals at the Pam Pam Club in Stuttgart, which unfortunately no longer exists. The Pam Pam Drive Inn opened in 1946. In 1966, it became a private supper club and served visiting duck hunters from around the world steaks and hash browns with cheese until 2008. I also have fond memories of the Pam Pam salad dressing. Don't even ask about Glynadean Thomas' famous punch.
I also think of world-renowned duck clubs that have called the Grand Prairie home through the years. My grandfather had once been the Prairie County judge and would treat us to stories of formal dinners eaten at Edgar Monsanto Queeny's Wingmead farm south of DeValls Bluff. Wingmead was established in 1937 by Queeny, the son of the founder of Monsanto Chemical Co. in St. Louis. By the time Queeny retired from Monsanto in 1960, it had become the third-largest chemical company in the country and the fifth-largest company of its kind in the world.
Queeny's passion away from work was duck hunting. He began hunting in the 1930s on Mill Bayou near DeWitt with a man named Elmer "Tippy" LaCotts. It was LaCotts who introduced Queeny to Jess Wilson, reputed to be the state's best duck caller and hunting guide. Queeny later found land to buy on LaGrue Bayou. He formed an irrigation district and used the power of eminent domain to acquire 11,000 acres.
Plans for the home at Wingmead were drawn in 1937 by a prominent St. Louis architect. The house was built in 1939. Queeny and his wife would come to the Grand Prairie each October and often would stay until March. Guests--including the likes of Walt Disney and Nash Buckingham--would arrive on Friday in time for a black-tie dinner. They would hunt ducks on Saturday and Sunday mornings, hunt quail on Saturday afternoon, and depart by Sunday afternoon. What I wouldn't give to be able to go back in time and experience one of those Grand Prairie weekends. It was on a Dec. 1, 1948, hunt near Clarendon that Buckingham (a man that many people consider the finest outdoors writer ever) lost his famous 12-gauge shotgun that he had nicknamed Bo Whoop after the deep sound it made upon discharge. Buckingham later would lament in print the loss of his gun, which finally turned up at an auction several years ago and is now housed in the Ducks Unlimited national headquarters at Memphis.
Many of us who didn't grow up there share a love of and fascination with the Grand Prairie, not only its duck hunting holes but also its culture, geography and the colorful characters who call it home. There's no other place in America quite like it

Rice Milk Market Supply-Demand, Market Research and End User Analysis, Outlook

Rice Milk market research is a compilation of insight data on market size, market growth trends that will help its buyer to capture opportunities, to know and minimize possible risks, to analyse the strategies of key companies in the market and to outline the performance of the market across regions etc. Industry experts project Rice Milk market to grow at a CAGR of 15.47% during the period 2017-2021.
Rice milk is a non-dairy milk, prepared by blending together cooked rice (mostly brown rice), water, rice syrup, sand rice starch. Some product varieties of rice milk also contain sugar, thickening agents, and flavorings.
Firstly, the Rice Milk market research report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, market status and industry chain structure. The Rice Milk market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions’ development status. What’s more, the Rice Milk industry development trends and growth patterns are analyzed.
Request a sample of Rice Milk market research report @ http://www.360marketupdates.com/enquiry/request-sample/10533795
Rice Milk market potential is analysed for each geographical region based on the growth rate, macroeconomic parameters, consumer buying patterns, demand and present scenarios in Rice Milk industry. To determine the Rice Milk market size the report considers the revenue generated through the sales of rice milk in key geographical regions such as the Americas, APAC, Europe, and ROW. Further the Rice Milk market report focuses on global major leading industry players with information. Report contains vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors operating in Rice Milk market space like DREAM, Pacific Foods, Vitasoy, WhiteWave Foods, Costco Wholesale Corporation and many more.
Rice Milk Market Drivers, Challenges and Trends: –
Rice Milk Market Driver: –  one of the major drivers for this market is rising levels of lactose intolerance. Lactose intolerance is the inability of the body to digest significant amounts of lactose present in milk. Certain ethnic groups such as the Asian population are more affected compared to others. The demand for lactose-free food products is driven by an increase in incidences of food allergies and intolerances.
Rice Milk Market Challenge: – one of the key challenges facing the growth of the global rice milk market is the rising popularity of other non-dairy milks, especially almond milk and rice milk. The global almond milk was valued at $3.51 billion in 2015 and is expected to reach $7.2 billion in 2020, growing at a CAGR of 15.45% during 2015-2020. Consumers prefer almond milk not only due to its taste but also owing to its functional properties of containing high amounts of vitamin E, calcium, magnesium, and potassium and almost no cholesterol.
Rice Milk Market trend: – The latest trend gaining momentum in the market is consumer focus shifting toward organic variants of rice milk. Organic products are mostly priced higher in comparison to the conventional products. The premium price is due to the comparatively high production and distribution costs as well as consumers’ willingness to pay extra for organic products. The extra “premium” cost associated with organic production is passed throughout the supply chain and at last paid by the end-consume
We even do customized reports for our customers; we can add the list of manufacturers or application type or product types that you need in the report. Ask for it @  http://www.360marketupdates.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/10533795
Market segmentation by product typeby product typeplain rice milk marketflavored rice milk market ; Geographic Segmentation: – Americas, Asia-Pacific (APAC) , Europe, Rest of the world (ROW)
This Rice Milk market research is result of
Qualitative analysis: – Market drivers, Market challenges, Market trends, Five forces analysis.
Quantitative analysis: – Market size and forecast, Market segmentation, Geographical insights, Competitive landscape.
Primary research: – Industry journals and periodicals, Government bodies, Annual reports of key stakeholders.
Secondary research: – Manufacturers/suppliers, Channel partners, Industry experts, Strategic decision makers.
Data synthesis: – Collation of data, Estimation of key figures, Analysis of derived insights.
Data validation: – Triangulation with data models, Reference against proprietary, databases, Corroboration with industry experts
http://www.military-technologies.net/2017/11/18/rice-milk-market-supply-demand-market-research-and-end-user-analysis-outlook/

Cuy calls on local chief execs to promote RICEponsibility in their communities

Published November 19, 2017, 11:17 AM
By Chito Chavez
Interior and Local Government (DILG) Officer-in-Charge (OIC) Catalino S. Cuy has called on the local chief executives of the country to support the  celebration of this year’s National Rice Awareness Month (NRAM) by promoting “RICEponsibility” in their communities.
DILG officer-in-charge Catalino S. Cuy credits: wikipedia
“Local government officials have a crucial role in the campaign to inform every Filipino of how they can help the country achieve rice self-sufficiency,” said Cuy.The theme for this year’s celebration of NRAM is “Ready? SET rice!  RICEponsible Filipinos save rice, eat healthy, and try brown rice” which focuses on the consumption of an appropriate quantity of rice and of healthy forms of rice especially brown rice and rice mixes.
Spearheaded annually by the Department of Agriculture, the celebration of NRAM every November is pursuant to Presidential Proclamation 524 series of 2004.In a directive, Cuy urged the governors and city and municipal mayors to participate in the #RICEponsiblePlateChallenge.He also encouraged local food establishments to include brown rice and rice mixes in their menu.
Likewise, Cuy enjoined them to add the recitation of the Panatang Makapalay in their flag-raising ceremony as well as to display tarpaulins bearing this year’s theme.
The Philippines’ active campaign on eating rice responsibly is due to the shortage in terms of rice production which in effect results in the high cost of rice grains in the market and attain rice sufficiency.The ‘Be RICEponsible’ campaign is an advocacy that aims to promote the Riceponsibility of every Filipino to their bodies and to the country for better health and rice self-sufficiency.
According to the DA-Philippine Rice Research Institute, a person can be “RICEponsible” by not wasting even a single grain of rice, eating brown rice and rice mixed with other staples, and by thanking rice farmers literally or valuing the fruits of their labor.DA said that compared with white rice, brown rice (unpolished rice) is nutritionally superior because its bran layer contains higher amounts of protein, dietary fiber, B vitamins, Vitamin E, minerals and antioxidants.
It added that brown rice makes one feel full faster, hence instead of a cup of white rice, half or three-fourths of brown rice is enough.
Meanwhile, eating rice-corn mix may help lower the risks of diabetes because corn has lower glycemic index compared to white rice.Also, eating rice-corn mix can help consumers because it delays or slows down the feeling of hunger or tiredness. Corn grains aid in slowing energy release.
https://news.mb.com.ph/2017/11/19/cuy-calls-on-local-chief-execs-to-promote-riceponsibility-in-their-communities/
GI Registry to decide Basmati claim of Madhya Pradesh soon
HYDERABAD: After Rosagolla decision Geographical Indication Registry at Chennai has decided to deliver a verdict in next 15 days on Madhya Pradesh claim on the inclusion of certain districts of State in the Basmati rice GI tag. The Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority of Ministry of Commerce and Industry was given GI tag in 2016 with the geographic area of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, Delhi, Uttarakhand and Parts of Western Uttar Pradesh and Jammu & Kashmir.
Chinnaraj G Naidu head of GI Registry in Chennai told TOI, "We will decide on Madhya Pradesh's claim of inclusion in next two weeks regarding Basmati rice," APEDA applied in 2008 and GI registry decided in its favour in 2016 with the geographical distribution of seven states. State of Madhya Pradesh in July 2017 has filed submission stating that Basmati rice is cultivated widely. It argued that State of Punjab was allowed to intervene in a late stage before issuing GI tag in 2016.
Madya Kshetra Basmati Growers Association also applied in favour of inclusion of Madhya Pradesh. All India Rice Exporters Association in August 2017 has filed an intervener petition against State of Madhya Pradesh that the State should not be given any time for filing additional evidence in support of their claim. State of Punjab has also objected strongly to claim for the inclusion of State of Madhya Pradesh district in GI Basmati. Dr Ranvir Singh Gill of Punjab Agricultural University was quoted in Punjab rebuttal saying,
"MP has never had any scientific or historical reputation of cultivating of Basmati let alone commercial cultivation. Any dilution of India pride may not only lead to very adverse effects on the livelihood of Basmati growing community in Punjab and other GI areas but also will have serious implication on Indian Economy as it will open gates not only for other States but other countries too." Pakistan has been fighting for owning up Basmati as it's own. The application of APEDA was then opposed by Basmati Growers Association of Lahore in Pakistan. However, BGA did not file its evidence in GI Registry within the period prescribed under the GI rules.
Basmati rice is exported worth thousands of crores of business. Andhra and Telangana grow in fewer areas when compared to other seven states. No attempts were made by the Telugu States for inclusion. Earlier in 2010, May 18 GI registry has rejected the application of The Heritage a society formed by farmers, traders, commission agents and millers of Karnal district of Haryana. GI registry then said Basmati rice being produced in at least six states of India and society apparently doesn't adequately represent the interest of all producers in other areas other than Karnal. According to APEDA India is the leading exporter of the Basmati Rice to the global market. The country has exported 40,00,471.56 MT of Basmati Rice to the world for the worth of Rs. 21,604.58 crores during the year 2016-17.
Major Export Destinations for 2016-17 are Saudi Arabia, Iran, United Arab Emirates, Iraq and Kuwait.

The Basmati is cultivated in Kaikaluru, Kalidindi, Agiripalli, Bapulapadu and Nagayalanka of Krishna district.

Andhra and Telangana did not claim significant cultivation of Pusa 1509 variety in Karimnagar, Warragal of Telangana and East and West Godavari and Krishna districts of Andhra Pradesh.
 According to APEDA the total basmati growing area in seven States came down by 7.92 percent to 1.56 million hectares in the 2017 Kharif season as compared to 1.69 mh previous years.

Basmati is predominantly grown in 81 districts in the country
Author Name: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/gi-registry-to-decide-basmati-claim-of-madhya-pradesh-soon/articleshow/61710873.cms


Millennials are pushing to eat healthier, eco-friendly foods: LT Foods
Millennials are pushing to eat healthier, eco-friendly foods: Ashwani Kumar Arora of LT Foods
MD & CEO Ashwani Kumar Arora on how LT Foods, the commodity trader, morphed into a global food giant on the back of basmati rice and health food.
Organic growth: Ashwani Kumar Arora, MD and CEO, LT Foods
In the 1980s, LT Foods was one of India’s biggest commodity traders in rice, grains, pulses and beans. Today, bulk rice constitutes 33 percent of its turnover at 1.3 lakh tonnes, while it sells 2.67 lakh tonnes of branded basmati rice annually, and is the world’s second largest rice miller, according to global marketing research firm AC Nielsen.  But if you peel back the layers of the LT Foods onion, you will discover bigger ambitions. “We want to be recognised as a global food company, not a commodity trader,” says its MD and CEO Ashwani Kumar Arora (52), whose father started the business as a grains trader in the 1950s. Arora’s father, Raghunath, set up the firm’s first rice mill in 1978 in Punjab’s Bhikhiwind village, close to India’s border with Pakistan. Since then, the BSE-listed company has established a footprint in 65 countries through its brands Daawat, Royal, and Hadeel.  In November 2016, LT Foods set up a joint venture with Japan’s Kameda Seika Co to make healthy rice snacks for South Asia. Last year, it also bought the Gold Seal Indus Valley and Rozana rice brands from Hindustan Unilever to boost its presence in the Middle East. In the US, it sells branded rice, organic cereals, sauces and Spanish grape seed oil. A few years ago, it introduced a pricey line of organic healthy foods, ecoLife, which sells superfoods like quinoa and roasted freekeh. Sales of healthy food products will top $1 trillion in 2017, according to market research firm Euromonitor.     Arora speaks to Forbes India about the company’s playbook and putting consumers’ health on priority. Edited excerpts:     Q. Is the firm’s transformation from a commodity trader to a food company driving growth?  My father started the business as a trading company in the 1950s, but to have long-term sustainability  it was necessary to create a food business with strong brands. While it is important to offer a quality product, branding is often at the heart of the companies that thrive. Over a 30-year journey, we have vigorously transformed into a global food company by establishing strong brands like Daawat, Royal, Hadeel and ecoLife.  Today, the trend is health plus convenience. At LT Foods, we are developing our product range based on that theme. Millennials are pushing for healthier, more eco-friendly foods.
Euromonitor says sales of healthy food products will top $1 trillion in 2017

Q. LT Foods has an estimated revenue of $500 million. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? LT Foods expects revenue to double to $1 billion by 2022. We have a clear roadmap. We are leveraging our brands to build an export-driven global food company. Improvements in procurement, processing, sales and distribution should lift operating profit as a percentage of revenue to 15 percent in the coming years from 12 percent. Life is like a giant chessboard where you have to be completely aware in the moment, but also thinking of a few moves ahead. At LT Foods, we are preparing for the future by creating products that are aligned to changing consumer preferences. We are concentrating on our organic foods portfolio which will be a growth driver, even as our core rice business provides strong cash flows.  Q. How much rice do you sell in India and what is your market share?  LT Foods annually sells about 2 lakh tonnes of branded basmati rice in India, and has a 20 percent market share. Branded packaged rice accounts for about two-thirds of our sales, while trading and value-added products, such as brown rice, make up the rest. Q. How important is North America in your growth strategy? We are a $500-million company and 30 percent of our revenue comes from America, so it’s our biggest export market, and will be for the foreseeable future. LT has more than 45 percent of the basmati rice market in the US with brands like Daawat and Royal. In July, we purchased the 817 Elephant brand to boost sales in the US and Canada. We’ve also partnered with Walmart and US specialty grocer Trader Joe’s. Q. You launched a $15-million rice processing plant in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, to cater to Europe. What are your investment plans for America? I don’t want to break down numbers, but we are making sizeable investments. In October, we launched our ready-to-serve rice plant in Houston, Texas. We are creating jobs through our main office in California, regional offices in Houston and New Jersey, and warehouses across the country. We also have a big marketing budget for the US.  Q. How do you remain responsive to shifting consumer needs?   Historically, the traditional tactics of advertising, promotion and price moved markets. It is not so easy now. The energy in a marketing-driven company was ‘yelling’ a message. In contrast, a new-age market-driven company ‘listens’ to its customers.  As a responsive brand, we keep track of relevant platforms that will help us reach and listen to our customers.  For example, we listened to our customers’ frustrations about how brown rice took ages to cook. In response, we developed our 12-minute ‘quick cook brown rice’ and it became an instant success. We have 80 percent market share of the branded brown rice market in India. We also launched Rozana Gold Plus, which has a mix of 80 percent basmati and 20 percent quick cook brown rice. Also, we are selling direct-to-consumers via digital platforms, making scale of distribution less of a differentiator. Q. How do you compete with KRBL Ltd and Kohinoor Foods? We aim to increase our annual rice processing volumes to 5 lakh tonnes in two years, from 4 lakh tonnes, by outsourcing to mills owned by others. We don’t want to invest capital and there is a lot of idle capacity available.  We respect our competition and keep tweaking our portfolio to keep up with changing market dynamics. I believe growing our portfolio beyond rice towards health foods puts us in a strong position competitively. Q. The 2014 sweepstakes, where you gave away a Mercedes-Benz car in the US to the winner of ‘25 Ways to Win With Basmati Rice’, created a buzz. Are sweepstakes part of your marketing strategy?  These initiatives are an integral part of our marketing strategy. When it comes to promotions, contests, sweepstakes and so on, we are all the same—we all want to win! These initiatives connect customers to our products. 







REAP seeks govt support to capture India’s $260m rice business with EU


Salim Ahmed
Lahore
The Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (REAP) has sought the government’s support to capture India’s $260 million rice business with the European Union (EU) following the EU’s zero tolerance on Tricyclazole chemical found in Indian grains.
The demand was raised by REAP Chairman Ch Samee Ullah Naeem at a seminar organized by the Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan for the awareness of its members. Thomas Unger of Eurofins Global Control GmbH was the guest speaker of the seminar, aimed at discussing the challenges being faced by the rice exporters to European market.
Unger said Pakistan has a huge potential of rice export but its exporters should pay attention towards meeting the specifications of their importers. He said that rice export to European countries was picking up but the exporters should pay attention towards issues like aflatoxins, pesticide residue and also new regulations being made by these markets. However, he said that complaints of aflatoxins in rice consignments from Pakistan had reduced to almost negligible level.
REAP chairman Ch Samee Ullah said that Pakistan can target India’s basmati rice share in the EU market, following the stringent policies placed by the European Union on the presence of hazardous pesticides in the commodity. From January 1, 2018, all countries that export basmati rice to the EU must bring down the maximum residue limit (MRL) level for Tricyclazole to 0.01 mg per kg. Up till now, the EU was accepting 1mg per kg from different countries, including India.
Ch Samee Ullah said that Pakistan can enhance its rice export to EU from 150,000 ton to 350,000 ton, grabbing the share of 200,000 tons of Indian rice export to EU which may be stopped due to strict regulations.
Tricyclazole is a fungicide used by Indian farmers in more than 70 percent of basmati crops. He said that Pakistan’s farmers do not use such chemicals to protect their crops. “Basmati varieties grown in Pakistan do not require use of the fungicide and stand to gain from the de-facto ban on Indian exports.”
India had exported rice of around 350,000 tons worth $260 million to the European Union countries in last fiscal year, 70 percent of which has tricyclazole limit of 1mg/1kg.
Samee Ullah Ch demanded the government to announce matching grant to shelve Pakistani product at the international store chains. Pakistan’s brand can get space by replacing Indian basmati rice in European countries’ renowned mega stores with the financial support of the government. “This presents an opportunity to grab India’s market share, because it will at least take two cycles to reduce the consumption of Tricyclazole in India,” he said.


Radiated carrageenan as plant-growth promoter shows promising results

Three years after its implementation, the research and development (R&D) program on radiation-modified carrageenan (RMC) as plant-growth promoter (PGP) produced beneficial effects as shown in the program’s review and evaluation held recently.
The program, “Plant Bio-stimulants and Elicitors from Radiation-modified Natural Polymers,” aims to use RMC in integrated nutrition-management designs, improve plant health and induce resistance to increase crop productivity in peanut, mungbean and rice.
Dr. Lucille V. Abad of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) presented the accomplishments and key findings of the project in the report, titled “Evaluation of the Effects of Radiation-modified Carrageenan on the Growth and Yield of Mungbean and Peanut.”
Abad reported that field experiments in the regions of Cagayan Valley, Central Luzon and in Calabarzon resulted in 16-percent to 51-percent increase in yield at RMC-PGP concentration of 50 parts per million (ppm) to 200 ppm.
Abad added that variation in the optimum concentration of RMC-PGP depend on the varieties of mungbean and peanut suited in the regions.
Leylani M. Juliano of the Philippine Rice Research Institute presented the second project, titled “Elucidation of Growth Promotion Mechanisms of Radiation-modified Carrageenan on Rice.”
The project aims to study the synergistic mechanism of RMC in its growth, promoting effects on rice under greenhouse and field conditions.
Juliano reported that the application of 300 ppm to 400 ppm RMC-PGP showed promising beneficial effects in rice, such as higher seed-germination rate, more tillers and panicles, and higher yield compared with other treatments.
Meanwhile, Dr. Gil L. Magsino, director of the National Crop Protection Center of the University of the Philippines Los BaƱos (UPLB), presented the potential use of RMC-PGP to induce resistance against major pests and diseases in rice under greenhouse and field conditions.
Magsino noted that the application of RMC-PGP induces resistance against tungro virus in inbred rice and bacterial-leaf blight in hybrid rice under field conditions. He also cited that applying RMC-PGP could be an innovative approach to combat pests and diseases of rice, thereby improving crop productivity.
Dr. Jocelyn E. Eusebio, director of Philippine Council for Agriculture, Aquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) Crop Research Division (CRD) led the terminal review and evaluation along with Dr. Pompe C. Sta. Cruz, director of the Institute of Plant Breeding of the College of Agriculture and Food Science (CAFS) at the UPLB and Dr. Erlinda S. Paterno, professor emeritus of the Agricultural Systems Institute of CAFS-UPLB.
The technical evaluators suggested the holding of a separate study on the role of RMC-PGP in enhancing the plants’ physiological processes.
The project, as suggested, is deemed to be a crucial parameter in explaining how RMC-PGP affects the growth, yield and resistance of selected agricultural crops.
The R&D Program on carrageenan is one of the programs under the PCAARRD Industry Strategic Science and Technology Program for Rice with the main goal of increasing rice productivity by 34 percent from 4.02 tons/hectare to 5.40 tons/hectare by 2020.
Held at the headquarters of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST)-PCAARRD, the program’s review and evaluation was attended by other DOST-PCAARRD staff from CRD, Applied Communication Division and Technology Transfer and Promotion Division. S&T Media 

https://businessmirror.com.ph/radiated-carrageenan-as-plant-growth-promoter-shows-promising-results/

Why you should stop eating white rice, according to a physician

 Nov. 17, 2017, 3:34 PM
·         White rice is a refined carbohydrate, just like white bread, flour tortillas, and most breakfast cereals.
·         Cleveland Clinic physician Roxanne B. Sukol says refined carbs should be called "stripped carbs" because they've been "stripped of all their nutrition."
·         Research has tied diets high in refined carbs to weight gain and obesity.
·         But that doesn't mean all carbs are bad for you — healthy carbs include whole grains like brown rice, wheat bread, beans, and bran.


From a nutritional standpoint, white rice pales in comparison to its whole grain cousin, brown rice.
It gets digested quickly, is rapidly processed into sugar, and only fills you up for a short period of time. In comparison, brown rice is processed slowly, churning out a steady stream of fuel to power your muscles and keep you feeling sharp.
White rice is a refined carbohydrate, similar to those found in white bread, flour tortillas, and most breakfast cereals. So inferior is it to whole grains that Roxanne B. Sukol, a Cleveland Clinic physician and the medical director of its wellness enterprise, says people should simply call it a "stripped carb" — because it has been "stripped of all [its] nutrition."
In the book "Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in America," Sukol told author and chef Michael Ruhlman that these "stripped carbs" were her chief nutritional concern. In rice, they can be easily avoided by choosing brown over white. But refined carbs lurk in dozens of processed foods as well, including granola bars, baked goods, pizzas, and pastas.
Diets high in refined carbs have been tied to weight gain and obesity. A review of 50 studies on diet and weight gain published in the journal Food and Nutrition Research found that on average, the more refined grains someone ate (like white bread and white rice), the more weight they tended to gain over the study period. By contrast, the more whole grain foods someone ate (like whole-wheat bread and brown rice), the less weight they tended to gain.
"Stripped carbs" start out just like their whole-grain cousins. In the factory, however, food makers remove the grains' nutritious, fiber-rich outer shells, such as the germ and bran. As a result, refined grains have less protein, fiber, and vitamins than whole grains.
Business Insider / Anaele Pelisson
Cara Anselmo, a nutritionist and outpatient dietitian at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, said another problem with refined carbs like white rice is that they are easy to overeat.
"It's definitely easiest to overdo it with drinks, refined carbs, foods that have added sugar or are highly processed — those are things that we just tend to keep going," she told Business Insider.
This doesn't mean all carbohydrates are bad, however. Instead of telling clients to ban things like bread and rice from their diets, Anselmo advises swapping foods with refined carbs for whole grain alternatives, like brown rice and whole-grain bread.
Beefsteak/Facebook
"People need to understand there are nutritious carbohydrates," Sukol told Ruhlman. These include fruits, vegetables, many beans, and legumes, which Sukol said contain a "fiber matrix" that slows down how quickly they get converted to sugar.
Several recent studies suggest that the best diets are based around whole grains, vegetables, and lean proteins. US News and World Report's analysis of  the best eating plans described plant-based diets — which have whole grains and vegetables as their cornerstone — as "good for the environment, your heart, your weight, and your overall health."
If you're looking to make a simple, healthy change to your diet, this might be one to try

Pakistan can earn $260 mn from basmati rice exports after EU ruling

  Last Updated On 18 November,2017 06:45 pm
The Chairman of Rice Exporters Association requested the government to intervene in the matter.
LAHORE (Dunya News) - Pakistan can make inroads at the European Union and boost the exports of basmati rice where the content of pesticides found higher compared to the new rulings effective from January 1, 2018.Sameeullah Naeem, Chairman of Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (REAP) told Dunya News on phone from Lahore that an opening has been created following the new ruling of the European Union.
He said recently basmati rice arriving from India was tested and about 70% of the commodity was found with chemical content known as Tricylazole chemical. Chairman explained this chemical was found as farmers usually use it as fungicide against Bacteria Blight and Blast. The amount of the chemical has been higher as per new ruling. According to new formation the content of the chemical in rice should be around 0.01mg per kilogram but after testing the chemical has been detected at 0.5 mg per kilogram which has hazardous.
Following these revelation, Pakistani exporters could capture the market to the tune of nearly 200,000 metric tons of basmati rice. Exporters could capture the EU market and could boost the exports by nearly 260 million dollars.
However, the Chairman REAP explained that it could be possible if the government intervene in the matter and give support and incentive to exporters.
“We need to market and place our products in chains of super markets in the EU which requires heavy investment”, he said.
Our basmati rice is high quality rice with graceful fragrance and above all our growers do not use chemical and pesticide on the commodity, he said. It is the best time to grab this opportunity and enter the EU market with a bang.


Authentic Afghan cuisine is right at home at Skewers of Temecula

Photo by Dorene Cohen
The lamb kebab wrap at Skewers of Temecula was filled with tender chunks of grilled lamb, vegetables and a yogurt sauce in a warm piece of Afghan bread.
By DAVID COHEN |
PUBLISHED: November 18, 2017 at 10:41 am | UPDATED: November 18, 2017 at 1:54 pm
If you drove by Skewers of Temecula, you’d never guess it serves a treasure trove of authentic dishes from throughout Afghanistan.
The land-locked country is bordered on the south/southeast by Pakistan, by Iran on the west, and by Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan on the north. Mountainous terrain extends from the northwest to the northeast.
In general, the food in the north tends not to be particularly spicy around Kabul, while further south near Kandahar, many dishes use chilies, particularly in areas closer to Pakistan. You’ll also find Iranian-style stews and pilaus (rice-based dishes) in the west. In the Hindu Kush at high elevations, people subsist on mountain goats, their milk and the cheese they produce. Vegetables and fruits, when available, have to be trucked in from Kabul.
I’ve not been to Afghanistan and venture that not many Americans other than State Department and, of course, military personnel, have, either. That said, if you haven’t eaten Afghan food, you’re in for a very distinctive experience.
The owners, who hail from Kabul, are Abdul Jabar Raishidi and his wife, Haida, and they will happily lead you through the menu. Photos of many of the dishes are posted along with descriptions and pricing. Portions are very generous.
Begin with a couple of appetizers: Shor nakhod is a blend of garbanzo beans and sliced potatoes served cold accompanied by chatni, a blend of homogenized vegetables in vinegar with a bit of finely diced chilies, reminding me flavorwise of a Chicago condiment, giardiniera. The vinegar does accentuate the spiciness, so use it in moderation.
Do not miss bolani, squares of Afghan bread (which very much resemble Indian naan) filled with sliced leeks and mashed potatoes — simple and delicious and made in-house. There is also a garlic yogurt sauce that you can dip the bolani into or drizzle on top of the bread.
Aush is a distinctively different soup comprising thin noodles, garbanzos, peas and carrots in a tangy broth sprinkled with dill and garnished with cilantro. You can add some chatni to spice things up a bit, although it’s a very hearty soup with a distinct undercurrent of heat.
Then there’s manto, or dumplings with chopped beef encased in a thin, glutinous rolled rice sheath that in thickness resembles shu mai dim sum.
Eight dumplings sit on a bed of yogurt sauce, while each dumpling is garnished with corn kernels, peas and cubed carrots and a dollop of yogurt. It’s a dish that is texturally intriguing, plentiful and oh so delicious.
The chapli kebab plate contained two ground beef patties made with garlic, ginger and potatoes served with basmati rice, a salad and Afghan bread.
Next came a chapli kebab plate — two fried beef patties incorporating ginger, garlic and potatoes were accompanied by a fluffy basmati rice and vermicelli mix, a mixed green salad with tomatoes and red onions and two pieces of Afghan bread. It was a complete meal on one plate that was flavorful and filling.
Of course, we had to try a lamb dish, so we opted for a lamb kebab wrap. Lots of tender, small cubes of grilled lamb were mixed with fresh vegetables inside a large, warm piece of rolled Afghan bread, accompanied by chatni and yogurt sauce.
Drizzling the garlic yogurt sauce adds a refreshing and pungent dimension to the flavor profile.

There are also salad plates that include a skewer of your choice with a piece of Afghan bread.If you’ve never had doogh, it’s a drink of yogurt blended with water, salt and mint and makes for a nice contrast to any particularly spicy dish.
Don’t leave without sampling the homemade baklava, which was not overly sweet like some other Middle Eastern versions. This one was lightly sprinkled with rose water and crushed pistachios.
This restaurant is the kind of place you want to go back to again and again to try everything on the menu.
David Cohen is a freelance dining critic and food co-editor for Inland Empire Magazine. Send him email at dcohen4@verizon.net and follow him on Twitter @dcfoodfiles.
Skewers of Temecula
Rating: 5 stars (out of 5)
Address: 41653 Margarita Road, Suite 108, Temecula
Information: 951-719-3237
Cuisine: Afghani
Atmosphere: Casual, small (not a lot of seating). Order at counter and food is delivered to your table.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, noon to 7  p.m. Saturdays-Sundays
Prices: $3.49-$4.49 appetizers, $8 salads, $7.49 specials, $7.50-$8 wraps, $9-$13 plates
Details: No alcoholic beverages. Extensive catering menu. Some items can be ordered with 24-hour advance notice, such as Aushak (scallion dumplings, which look like ravioli and contain ground beef, and Gandana, which are small, thin Afghan leeks) and also Iranian-style pilaus and stews.
Recommended dishes: Aush soup, Manto dumplings, bolani and lamb kabob wrap
Cards: All majors

Bernas threatens to sue NGO Padi Rescue for defamation

Published: Today 1:33 pm     Modified: Today 2:23 pm
 
Bernas, the national rice importer, has issued a legal notice threatening to sue a coalition of rice farmer NGOs known as Padi Rescue for defamation. The group, whose stated aim is to save the paddy industry, had on Oct 20 delivered a memorandum to Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak calling for the re-establishment of the National Paddy And Rice Board (LPN) to regulate the national rice industry.
Bernas, which is owned by Syed Mokhtar Al-Bukhary, took over the functions of LPN in 1994, and is now the sole permit holder of rice imports.The company is seeking damages, as well as the retraction of the statements made by Padi Rescue in the memorandum.
PKR Alor Setar MP Gooi Hsiao Leung, who has been assisting the group, said that Bernas’ legal threats are tantamount to "using strong-arm tactics to bully, intimidate and silence rice farmers, millers and other interested parties."
"They want to silence these groups from legitimately scrutinising Bernas' public role in managing the rice industry as mandated by the government...


Rice prices stable: Tofail

UNB . Sangsad Bhaban | Update: 00:02, Nov 20, 2017
Commerce minister Tofail Ahmed on Sunday told parliament that the prices of rice and other daily essentials remain stable in the country.Responding to a question from Awami League MP SM Mostafa Rashidi (Khulna-4), he said the government succeeded in tackling the syndicate of dishonest hoarders and middlemen who usually manipulate the prices of food items and goods to create unrest in the market.
“In the absence of the syndicate, the prices of essentials are now stable. People can buy commodities at tolerable prices,” Tofail said.
Describing various steps taken by the government to arrest the once skyrocketing price of rice, he said, “The price is now at a tolerable level.”
The minister also said the government established the Bangladesh Competition Commission to ensure so that no syndicate can be formed.He said the government will impose duty on the import of rice again after the harvest of new paddy.“Or else, the import of rice will go on and farmers won’t get fair prices for their produce,” he said.

http://en.prothom-alo.com/bangladesh/news/134972/Rice-prices-stable-Tofail