Friday, October 04, 2019

4th October,2019 Daily Global Regional Local Rice E-Newsletter



Farmers urge govt to declare agri-emergency

October 4, 2019
Description: PHOTO: FILE
LAHORE: The Farmers Bureau of Pakistan (FBP), a representative platform for progressive growers, has urged the government to declare agriculture and climate emergency in the country in order to save the sector from bad weather that the country has experienced over the past few days.
“Cotton, rice and corn crops have been nearly ruined because of the erratic weather, heat wave and a lack of promotion of new technologies in the agriculture sector,” said founding members of the FBP. “We may witness a loss of 40% in rice and maize yields while cotton may also face a similar fate.”
Talking to a group of journalists on Thursday, FBP founding members Dr Zafar Hayyat, Mian Shaukat, Aamir Hayat Bhandara and Imran Shah Khagga urged the government to make immediate intervention to save the growers. They pointed out that maize was not a crop for the southern region of Punjab but due to the poor performance of cotton crop, the farmers were opting to plant rice and maize in that region.
“Seed companies should have informed the growers earlier that varieties being marketed by them were not meant for all regions and they should test them while keeping changing weather conditions in mind,” they said. They were of the view that the agriculture sector could register negative growth this year, even lower than the previous year.
The FBP founding members urged the government to immediately improve its policies, control seed trade, introduce such seed varieties that were resistant to climate changes and bring technology in the sector.
Hayyat pointed out that untimely windstorms, erratic rains and sudden heat wave had impacted the rice and maize crops. Khagga pointed out that the formula for manufacturing pesticides, which were being marketed in the country, was 30 to 40 years old and they did not prove effective against pests.
He said pesticides of billions of rupees were being imported and marketed but such insecticides had no efficacy against pests rather they were causing illness among human beings and contaminating water.
He was of the view that independent surveys showed that the country might produce only 12 million bales of cotton this season against the target of 15 million bales despite an increase in the area under cultivation.

‘Climate change can cause 40 percent loss of major crops’

OCTOBER 4, 2019
Description: Smart-tech-the-new-tool-for-African-farmers-copyThe Farmers Bureau of Pakistan (FBP) has urged the government to impose agriculture & climatic emergency to save the sector from the bad patch it is witnessing at present, while they fear that Pakistan may witness 40 percent decrease in major crops owing to prevailing situation.
This concern was raised by FBP representatives Dr Zafar Hayyat, Mian Shaukat, Aamir Hayat Bhandara and Imran Shah Khagga while talking to the members of the Agriculture Journalists Association (AJA) on Thursday at the Lahore Chamber of Commerce and Industries.
They said that maize is not a crop of South but due to poor performance of cotton, people opted for planting rice and maize. They said that the companies should have told the growers that varieties being marketed by them are not meant for their region or they should plant it while keeping the weather conditions in mind. Dr. Zafar Hayyat said that they had formed the platform of FBP to play their role in putting the policy makers on right path which could steer this sector out of present marsh. He said that untimely wind storms, erratic rains and sudden heat had caused lodging in rice and maize crops.
Imran Shah Khagga, another progressive grower, termed that the formula of pesticides being marketed at present are 30-40 years old and do not have resistance power against the pests. He said that pesticides of billions of rupees are imported and marketed for trillion of rupees but such medicines have no efficacy against pests rather causing illness even among the human beings coupled with the contaminated water. He claimed that independent surveys are saying that we might have 12 million bales of cotton as against the target of 15 million bales despite increase in area under cultivation. He said that our issue is pink bollworm and to tackle it world had introduced such cotton seed varieties which have resistance against this pest. He said that we have requested the National Productivity Organisation (NPO) and other institutes concerned to ban such seed which have no proper gene expression and cannot fight against diseases prevailing in this region.
Farmers for declaring agri and climate emergency

Government should immediately improve policies, control seed trade, introduce seed varieties resistant to climatic changes


Description: Farmers for declaring agri and climate emergency
LAHORE   -    The Farmers Bureau of Pakistan (FBP), a representative body of progressive growers, has urged the government to declare agriculture and climate emergency to take the sector out of prevailing crisis.

Pak-China Free Trade Agreement To Become Operational Shortly: Ambassador Hashmi

 
Description: Pak-China Free Trade Agreement to become operational shortly: Ambassador Hashmi

Pakistan Ambassador to China Naghmana Alamgir Hashmi has said that Free Trade Agreement (FTA) signed between Pakistan and China would become operational in a few months

BEIJING, (APP - UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News - 4th Oct, 2019 ) :Pakistan Ambassador to China Naghmana Alamgir Hashmi has said that Free Trade Agreement (FTA) signed between Pakistan and China would become operational in a few months.
"Actually the free trade agreement will hopefully be implemented shortly, because it's still going through the internal processes of being ratified. We hope that in the next few months, it will become operational," she said in an exclusive interview to China Economic Net (CEN) here on Friday.
Ambassador Hashmi said, "On our side all the procedures have been completed. On the Chinese side, there are a few procedures which are left. So we think it is going to be sooner rather than later. We just need to wait a little more, because governmental procedures have to take. But I think it will be very shortly very, very shortly." While commenting on increase in Pakistan export to China, she said with the FTA becoming operational, the prices will in any way go down, because the import duties will not apply then.
"Secondly, we have just now in the process of completing the first phase of CPEC and the second phase of CPEC has now started, which is actually the establishment of special economic zones in various parts of the country.
So with the establishment of these special economic zones and with the increasing number of agreements and cooperation in the agricultural sector, which is a priority both with President Xi and with Prime Minister Imran Khan, I think this is one area where there is huge potential of both investments, growth and then re-export of those value added products to China," she added.
Commenting on export potential, she there are certain products which have traditionally come to China, which are very much appreciated here.
"We export a lot of rice to China that's called 86. It's the small glutinous rice. Then sugar is increasingly being imported in China. And sugar is very good quality. And yarn, we produce a lot of cotton and you have a huge textile industry. So yarn comes to China," she added.
Ambassador Hashmi said the Balochistan province is the only area in the world that produces onyx. Then a lot of gold and copper is being exported to ChinaPakistan has a lot of potential both in minerals and in gemstones but do not have that advanced technology to polish and create them. So that is another area where Pakistan is looking for potential joint ventures.
Pakistan, she said, export a number of leather products which are very good in quality and the area that has the most potential and again the area that has the focus of the leadership of both countries is agricultural products, development of farms, research in hybrid seeds, research and cooperation in the area that you put in the ground for cultivation.
"Then there is a huge prospect of cooperation in drip irrigation, because we are now trying to go to drip irrigation because of the shortage of water," she added.
She said that China is one of the leading countries that have really made very good use of drip irrigation and opined that agriculture is one area where there is a huge potential of further cooperation and joint ventures and investments, adding, "And then, of course, export of the materials to China and beyond China also." While dispelling the impression about delay of operation of Sukkur-Multan morotwary, she said the actual project itself has been completed. But along with this highway, there are certain other things that need to be established, adding, "For example, the barriers along the road have to be put in place. That work is ongoing. The lights have to be put. The police force for that particular highway is being raised. So those little things are left." Ambassador Hashmi reiterated all China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (PEC) projects have absolute and full support of the government of Pakistan, of the people of Pakistan, of all the political parties across the political divide.
So there is no confusion or no controversy on either the importance of CPEC or the importance of completing the projects in time.
And some of the projects have been completed even before time.
"Our Prime Minister has met President Xi twice and he has very clear and categorical terms conveyed to the Chinese leadership that commitment to CPEC and to BRI is absolute and unshakable," she added.
About visa policy for Chinese citizens, she said for ChinesePakistan has on arrival visa policy and now there is also online visa.
"One of the first countries with which we've liberalized visa regime is China. There is so much work going on. There's so much people to people contact. There's so much political contact," she added.
Pakistan, she said, liberalized the visa regime for 94 countries. Pakistan is an open country. "We have nothing to hide. We're not like the Indian occupied Kashmir, where people can't go. You can go anywhere in Pakistan. You're very welcome." On registration of cell phone at Pakistani airport, she said in Pakistan, a lot of people who were misusing this particularly when there was a lot of terrorism going on. So in order to control that, the authorities have made a policy.
Every foreigner who comes to visit Pakistan and even Pakistanis, it's not only for foreigners, any traveler who's living abroad and is coming home, at the airport, he needs to register his phone.
"And that takes five minutes. So if your phone is registered at the airport and you only have to do once, nobody will stop you. But if your phone is not registered, then it becomes a problem," she added.
Ambassador Hashmi asked all the Chinese going to Pakistan that there are big booths at the airport where they should register phone. "So if your phone is registered, your SIM will work. There's absolutely no problem." To yet another question, she said that tax was import on cell phones to stop smuggling and not to stop the communication.
"So if you have a phone that you're using, you register it, you bring it. They know that you're going back. You're not leaving the phone here. But if you have new phones, so in one year, one visitor can only bring one new phone," she added.
On export of Sugar to China for next year, she said, "I think next year also, because for our growers, exporters and manufacturers of sugar, it's a product that we have introduced in Chinese market. Once the word goes around that this was a successful venture, I am sure next year you'll get more and the year after you might even get more." Regarding a chain, from PakistanChinaSouth Korea, and export to European countries, she said that Pakistan have always had very good relations with South Korea and a very good export trade with that country.
"So I think it's a very good idea that you pick up one expertise from one country, another from another country, and one advantage of a third country join together. I think this is very, very good. Our world is progressing and the three are friendly countries, there should not be a problem," she added.
About recently held Mango festival, she said this was the third mango festival that was organized in Beijing, which was so successful.
A very large number of Chinese attended the festival to taste mango, to taste the various mango products and we hope to see Pakistani mangoes being sold in supermarkets and markets all over China.
Ambassador Hashmi said with the completion of CPEC and the establishment of cold chains, lot of projects can then be transported by road and they won't have to be airlifted.
"Mangoes cannot be shipped up to now, because it has very short shelf life and by road with a cold chain is also necessary for fisheries and other agricultural products, so that is another area where a lot of Chinese investors have an opportunity to do business in Pakistan, which would be mutually beneficial to the importers and the exporters, and is a nice way of introducing good Pakistani agricultural products at reasonable prices here in China," she added.
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BIR closes warehouses; rice stocks smuggled?
October 4, 2019

Description: Top01 100419BIR Deputy Commissioner Arnel SD Guballa (center) and Assistant Secretary Tony Lambino of the Department of Finance inspect imported rice from Vietnam and Myanmar during a raid on 11 warehouses in Guiguinto, Bulacan, on Thursday.
THE Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) on Thursday padlocked 11 warehouses in Guiguinto, Bulacan, for various tax violations, including non-registration and failure to pay the annual registration fee. Authorities, meanwhile, are also checking if the rice was smuggled into the country.
The raiding team led by officials of the Department of Finance (DOF) and BIR said that the stalls were illegally operated by five companies that stored at least 410,000 sacks of importedrice from Vietnam and Myanmar.
“After the closure, we will do an inventory, we will document them for us to determine if these are considered smuggled rice,” Revenue Deputy Commissioner for Operations Arnel Guballa said.
The establishments owned by Cagayan Corn Products Corp., Pacific Rim Transport and Logistics Inc., UPFC Logistics Corp., AAI Logistics Cargo Express Inc., and JCOMP Trading and Distribution have been under the tax agency’s watch since March.
Aside from imported rice, the raiding team also discovered five warehouses containing corn flour, imported soy milk, and liquid detergent products.
The revenue-collecting agency has yet to determine the worth of all the goods, pending an inventory that was ongoing as of press time.
“We have been monitoring these businesses since March and in a span of seven months, we discovered sacks of rice, corn flour, and milk; they are registered in BIR as a ‘logistics and tracking’ company,” Guballa explained.
DOF Assistant Secretary Tony Lambino warned that the tax-delinquent establishments in Bulacan may endanger consumers’ health if the rice imports are proven to be smuggled. “If these rice are smuggled, we are endangering the health of our consumers—these sacks of rice may have skipped the sanitary measures [that are conducted] if you legally import food,” Lambino said.
The warehouses will remain closed until all tax deficiencies have been settled.

Does National Insurance Requirement Mean Rough Seas for Coal Shipments?
Indonesia October 2 2019
A recently published surveyor report (laporan surveryor) on Indonesian coal exports noted that as of March 2019, of 1,095 coal shipments in 2019 only 9% were insured under a national insurance company. This number is alarming for both the Government and coal exporters in Indonesia, given that just two years ago the Ministry of Trade issued MOT Regulation No. 82 of 2017 regarding Provisions for the Utilization of National Maritime Transportation and Insurance for the Export and Import of Certain Goods (Reg. 82). This regulation has been amended several times since it was issued, most recently by MOT Regulation No. 80 of 2018 (Reg. 82 as amended).
The regulation was issued in an effort to create more opportunities for national shipping companies and national insurance companies that engage in import and export activities. Initially, Reg. 82 gave exporters and importers the choice of using national or foreign shipping and insurance companies. However, a more restrictive approach has since been taken, specifically for coal, crude palm oil, rice and goods for government procurement.
Under Reg. 82, exports of coal and crude palm oil can only be undertaken by national shipping companies and can only be insured with national insurance. Similar obligations have been imposed for imports of rice and government procurements.
Exporters and importers can be exempted from the obligation to use national shipping companies when such companies are limited or unavailable. There was a similar exemption for the use of national insurance, but under Reg. 82 as amended, exporters and importers, without exception, must now use national insurance. The provision previously granting exporters and importers the possibility of utilizing foreign insurance has been removed.
It is worth noting that failure to satisfy the requirement to utilize national insurance for the export and import of coal, crude palm oil, rice and goods for government procurement has potentially grave implications for exporters and importers. According to Reg. 82 as amended, incompliant exporters and importers may be subject to administrative sanction in the form of the suspension or revocation of their license.
The obligation to use national maritime transportation is scheduled to come into force starting May 1, 2020, while the obligation to use national insurance came into force on February 1, 2019, but was postponed to June 1, 2019 through Director General of Foreign Trade (DGFT) Circular Letter No. 123/DAGLU/SD/2019.
Understanding that the obligation to use national insurance is already binding, this article only addresses the practical issues for coal supply and transportation contracts in Indonesia in view of this national insurance obligation.
There are two practical issues that may arise, namely (i) whether existing foreign insurance under coal supply and transportation contracts that existed prior to the implementation of this national insurance requirement must be switched to national insurance, and (ii) whether the holder of the insurance policy should be the exporter or the foreign purchaser of the coal.
Existing Foreign Insurance
We note that none of the provisions within these regulations incorporate any grandfathering exception for pre-existing coal supply and transportation contracts. This means the national insurance obligation vested under Reg. 82 as amended is enforceable even for contracts that existed before the enactment of the regulation. Our recent non-formal discussions with the MOT support this understanding.
This raises practical issues in adjusting pre-existing contracts in Indonesia that were mostly concluded by way of adopting the International Commercial Terms (Incoterms). One of the key Incoterms often adopted by companies engaging in coal supply and transportation activities is the Free on Board (FOB) term. In essence, the FOB term prescribes that the buyer will be responsible for costs/liabilities once goods are shipped. This includes the costs of insuring the goods. It is likely that buyers outside Indonesia, using the FOB term, will obtain insurance from foreign insurance companies rather than from national insurance companies in Indonesia.
Our reading of Reg. 82 as amended and its implementing guidelines, i.e., DGFT Regulation No. 02/DAGLU/PER/1/2019 regarding Technical Guidance for the Implementation of the Obligation to Use a National Insurance Company for the Export and Import of Certain Goods (Reg. 02), is that the holder of existing insurance from a foreign insurance company for the shipment of coal will still have to procure insurance from a national insurance company. We received a non-formal confirmation from an MOT official on this.
The national insurance companies referred to under Reg. 82 as amended and Reg. 02 need not be wholly Indonesian owned, whether directly or indirectly. Insurance from national insurance companies can be used for the shipment of coal if it qualifies for registration with the MOT. This means it is obtained from a general or sharia insurance company established under the laws of Indonesia and licensed by the Financial Services Authority (Otoritas Jasa Keuangan or OJK). It is therefore possible for the national insurance company to be a subsidiary or affiliate of an international insurance company.
Holder of Insurance Policy
In practice, under the FOB term, the buyer of the coal procures insurance from an insurance company and acts as the policyholder and the insured. This is in contrast with the requirement under Reg. 82 as amended that the exporter is the party that procures the insurance from a national insurance company.
According to our reading of Reg. 82 as amended and Reg. 02, the holder of the insurance policy need not necessarily be the coal exporter; it depends on the terms adopted under the contracts. This conclusion was reached upon reviewing Reg. 02, which requires exporters to “submit” an application for an insurance policy to a national insurance company. Within this context, a plain reading of the word “submit” indicates that the exporter need not be the one holding the national insurance, and merely is required to “submit” the application for the national insurance, regardless of which party holds it. Our recent non-formal discussions with the MOT support this interpretation.
Further, an MOT official asserted that Reg. 02, which requires that an insurance application submission include (a) a Taxpayer Identity Number (Nomor Pokok Wajib Pajak or NPWP), (b) the name of the insured, (c) the address of the insured and (d) the type of goods, does not limit the holder of the insurance policy. While we understand that only an Indonesian national or legal entity will have an NPWP, the requirement set out under Reg. 02 may simply be disregarded for the simple reason that the requirement is not applicable.

The devil in the rice detail
Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:28 AM October 04, 2019
Though rice tariffication is much better than the quantitative restrictions implemented by the government-led import monopoly, the devil is in the 35-percent level.
Two years ago, we wrote about how the tariff level should be fair—neither siding with the importers nor the local producers. We said this would be good for consumers and challenge local producers, who would have to be efficient or else perish in the process.
At that time, we quoted  a Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) study that suggested 70 percent as the tariff level that would level the playing field for both imported and domestic rice. A 35-percent level would be preferable.
But to be fair, the government should first give the farmers the necessary support measures to enable them to compete. A suggested road map with details such as the areas where other crops could be diverted and the budget needed was never implemented.
The government was correct in implementing the 35-percent tariff because it was a commitment to the World Trade Organization. But what the government missed was the safeguards provided by the WTO itself and our very own Republic Act 8800 or Safeguard Measures Act.
On Aug. 13, the Alyansa Agrikultura officially asked for safeguard measures because imports had already ballooned to 2.4 million tons, or twice our annual import requirement.
We expect imports to have reached 3 million tons in September. And more should be coming in  because a tariff level enough to safeguard our own produce has been delayed.
A rice disaster is already happening. Farm-gate prices of wet palay now average P11.62 per kilo in Region II, P12.41 in Region III and P12 in Region VI.
Since the average production cost is P12, we will see huge losses on a large scale and the demise of the rice industry unless the safeguard is implemented soon.
In my doctoral dissertation on the successful transfer of a system to a real world setting, I said there was a need for preparation.
Critical elements must be present, such as the provision of necessary facilities, the required infrastructure and a supportive business and socioeconomic  environment.
These elements are not present for the success of the 35-percent tariff.
To say that farmers can immediately shift from rice to other crops without the necessary support mechanisms is foolhardy, irresponsible and dangerous.
Agriculture Secretary William Dar should be commended for taking the bold step of initiating the safeguard measure investigations weeks ago, despite strong opposition that has delayed the necessary actions.
Food security, instead of food self-sufficiency, is our objective. But we must survive this crisis to get there.
In the late 1990s, our agriculture and farmers suffered severely when we implemented the WTO-suggested rapid tariff reduction without the WTO-approved safeguard measures.
This could happen again.
A well-known personality in another field said: “You cannot make the same mistake twice.  The second time you make it, it is not a mistake anymore. It’s a choice. Enough.”
If the safeguards are not implemented immediately, the rice farmers may well behave in undesirable ways and say, “Enough.”
We must therefore attend to this rice detail before anything unfortunate occurs.
Waning demand prompts Indian, Thai exporters to lower prices
Description: https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/_NXDTc3Xd9dmtgd_A.KyVQ--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9ODQ7aD04NA--/https:/media-mbst-pub-ue1.s3.amazonaws.com/creatr-uploaded-images/2018-12/5be41ec0-ff0b-11e8-adef-442891c98066
By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri
ReutersOctober 3, 2019
Description: Waning demand prompts Indian, Thai exporters to lower prices
FILE PHOTO: A Thai farmer holds rice in his hand in Khon Kaen province
By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri
BENGALURU (Reuters) - Rice export rates in Asian hubs fell this week as weak demand and currency fluctuations prompted sellers in India and Thailand to cut prices, while expectations of lower interest from the Philippines weighed on the Vietnamese market.
Thailand's benchmark 5% broken rice prices were quoted slightly lower at $396-$417 a tonne versus last week's $400-$420.
"Exporters have to lower prices to lure buyers," a Bangkok-based rice trader said adding: "I've not been able to sell any rice for two months now."
Thai exporters have struggled since the start of the year as the baht, which has been Asia's best performing currency this year, has kept Thai prices higher than those of competitors India and Vietnam.
"There could be a possible deal for parboiled rice from African markets ahead of Christmas, and perhaps some demand from China and other Asian markets for jasmine rice towards the end of the year," another Bangkok-based trader said
"But as of now there is simply no major demand due to our high prices."
Prices of top exporter India's 5% broken parboiled variety also extended losses, dipping to around $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375 a week ago on a weak rupee and subdued demand.
"Demand is weak. Traders are waiting for the new season crop," said an exporter based at Kakinada in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.
Indian rice exports in April-July plunged 26.5% from a year ago to 3.14 million tonnes, a government body said last month, on subdued demand for non-basmati rice from Africa.
In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice were quoted at $330-$340 a tonne, free on board, compared with $335 a week earlier. Prices had plunged to a near 12-year low of about $325 in the week to Sept. 19.
"We are concerned that exports to Philippines will decline as it is seeking to limit rice imports to protect local farmers," a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.
Philippines, one of the world's biggest rice importers, may consider imposing a safeguard duty on rice to ease the pain of local farmers hurting from a surge in imports.
Vietnam's rice shipments in the first nine months of 2019 likely rose 4.5% to 5.1 million tonnes, but export revenue was expected to drop 9.7% in the same period.
Elsewhere, a heavy spell of retreating monsoon rains has submerged vast swathe of farmland in low-lying Bangladesh, still recovering from previous floods.    Floods in July washed away crops that would have yielded nearly 400,000 tonnes of rice, agriculture ministry estimates showed.
"If the water recedes soon, it won't have much impact on paddy crops," an agriculture ministry official said.

(Reporting by Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Ruma Paul in Dhaka and Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai; editing by Arpan Varghese and David Evans)

Cambodia's rice export to China up 44 pct in 9 months
Source: Xinhua| 2019-10-03 19:25:03|Editor: Xiang Bo
PHNOM PENH, Oct. 3 (Xinhua) -- Cambodia had exported 157,793 tons of milled rice to China during the first nine months of 2019, up 44 percent over the same period last year, said an official report on Thursday.
China remained the top buyer of Cambodian rice during the January-September period this year, said the report of the Secretariat of One Window Service for Rice Export.
The export to China accounted for 39.6 percent of the country's total rice export, it said.
Meanwhile, the Southeast Asian nation shipped 135,475 tons of rice to the European market, down 30 percent, said the report, adding that the European Union (EU)'s market share for Cambodian rice had declined to 34 percent from 49.7 percent.
The slump in the export to the European market came after the EU imposed earlier this year duties for three years on rice importing from Cambodia in a bid to curb a surge in rice imports from the country and to protect European producers.
According to the report, Cambodia exported a total of 398,586 tons of rice to 53 countries and regions across the globe during the first nine months of this year, up 2.3 percent over the same period last year.

ASIA RICE-WANING DEMAND PROMPTS INDIAN, THAI EXPORTERS TO LOWER PRICES
10/3/2019
* Thai rates more expensive than competitors
* India prices ease to $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375
* Philippines mulls safeguard duty on rice imports
* Fresh floods submerge farm land in Bangladesh
By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri
BENGALURU, Oct 3 (Reuters) - Rice export rates in Asian hubs fell this week as weak demand and currency fluctuations prompted sellers in India and Thailand to cut prices, while expectations of lower interest from the Philippines weighed on the Vietnamese market.
Thailand's benchmark 5% broken rice <RI-THBKN5-P1> prices were quoted slightly lower at $396-$417 a tonne versus last week's $400-$420.
"Exporters have to lower prices to lure buyers," a Bangkok-based rice trader said adding: "I've not been able to sell any rice for two months now."
Thai exporters have struggled since the start of the year as the baht, which has been Asia's best performing currency this year, has kept Thai prices higher than those of competitors India and Vietnam.
"There could be a possible deal for parboiled rice from African markets ahead of Christmas, and perhaps some demand from China and other Asian markets for jasmine rice towards the end of the year," another Bangkok-based trader said
"But as of now there is simply no major demand due to our high prices."
Prices of top exporter India's 5% broken parboiled variety <RI-INBKN5-P1> also extended losses, dipping to around $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375 a week ago on a weak rupee and subdued demand.
"Demand is weak. Traders are waiting for the new season crop," said an exporter based at Kakinada in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.
Indian rice exports in April-July plunged 26.5% from a year ago to 3.14 million tonnes, a government body said last month, on subdued demand for non-basmati rice from Africa.
In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice <RI-VNBKN5-P1> were quoted at $330-$340 a tonne, free on board, compared with $335 a week earlier. Prices had plunged to a near 12-year low of about $325 in the week to Sept. 19.
"We are concerned that exports to Philippines will decline as it is seeking to limit rice imports to protect local farmers," a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.
Philippines, one of the world's biggest rice importers, may consider imposing a safeguard duty on rice to ease the pain of local farmers hurting from a surge in imports.
Vietnam's rice shipments in the first nine months of 2019 likely rose 4.5% to 5.1 million tonnes, but export revenue was expected to drop 9.7% in the same period.
Elsewhere, a heavy spell of retreating monsoon rains has submerged vast swathe of farmland in low-lying Bangladesh, still recovering from previous floods.
Floods in July washed away crops that would have yielded nearly 400,000 tonnes of rice, agriculture ministry estimates showed.
"If the water recedes soon, it won't have much impact on paddy crops," an agriculture ministry official said. (Reporting by Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Ruma Paul in Dhaka and Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai; editing by Arpan Varghese and David Evans)
RPT-ASIA RICE-WANING DEMAND PROMPTS INDIAN, THAI EXPORTERS TO LOWER PRICES
10/3/2019
(Repeats with no changes)
* Thai rates more expensive than competitors
* India prices ease to $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375
* Philippines mulls safeguard duty on rice imports
* Fresh floods submerge farmland in Bangladesh
By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri
BENGALURU, Oct 3 (Reuters) - Rice export rates in Asian hubs fell this week as weak demand and currency fluctuations prompted sellers in India and Thailand to cut prices, while expectations of lower interest from the Philippines weighed on the Vietnamese market.
Thailand's benchmark 5% broken rice <RI-THBKN5-P1> prices were quoted slightly lower at $396-$417 a tonne versus last week's $400-$420.
"Exporters have to lower prices to lure buyers," a Bangkok-based rice trader said adding: "I've not been able to sell any rice for two months now."
Thai exporters have struggled since the start of the year as the baht, which has been Asia's best performing currency this year, has kept Thai prices higher than those of competitors India and Vietnam.
"There could be a possible deal for parboiled rice from African markets ahead of Christmas, and perhaps some demand from China and other Asian markets for jasmine rice towards the end of the year," another Bangkok-based trader said
"But as of now there is simply no major demand due to our high prices."
Prices of top exporter India's 5% broken parboiled variety <RI-INBKN5-P1> also extended losses, dipping to around $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375 a week ago on a weak rupee and subdued demand.
"Demand is weak. Traders are waiting for the new season crop," said an exporter based at Kakinada in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.
Indian rice exports in April-July plunged 26.5% from a year ago to 3.14 million tonnes, a government body said last month, on subdued demand for non-basmati rice from Africa.
In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice <RI-VNBKN5-P1> were quoted at $330-$340 a tonne, free on board, compared with $335 a week earlier. Prices had plunged to a near 12-year low of about $325 in the week to Sept. 19.
"We are concerned that exports to Philippines will decline as it is seeking to limit rice imports to protect local farmers," a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.
Philippines, one of the world's biggest rice importers, may consider imposing a safeguard duty on rice to ease the pain of local farmers hurting from a surge in imports.
Vietnam's rice shipments in the first nine months of 2019 likely rose 4.5% to 5.1 million tonnes, but export revenue was expected to drop 9.7% in the same period.
Elsewhere, a heavy spell of retreating monsoon rains has submerged vast swathe of farmland in low-lying Bangladesh, still recovering from previous floods.
Floods in July washed away crops that would have yielded nearly 400,000 tonnes of rice, agriculture ministry estimates showed.
"If the water recedes soon, it won't have much impact on paddy crops," an agriculture ministry official said. (Reporting by Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Ruma Paul in Dhaka and Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai; editing by Arpan Varghese and David Evans)

Shiv Nadar University researchers make self-cleaning coating material from rice husk

TV Jayan  New Delhi | Updated on October 03, 2019  Published on October 03, 2019
Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/xlg4xx/article26890704.ece/alternates/WIDE_435/BL20-RICE2

Apart from replacing toxic paints, the coating helps conserve water used for cleaning

Researchers from a private university in Greater Noida, have been able to produce a smart coating material with self-cleaning properties from rice husk, which when applied on a range of surfaces, can help fight adverse effects of corrosion and dust.
Corrosion is a serious problem the world over, and it is said that it costs around $2.5 trillion globally, which is equal to 3.4 per cent of global GDP.
The organic coating material developed by the team of researchers led by Harpreet Singh Grewal of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Shiv Nadar University (SNU), nearly 40 kilometres from the capital, helps address a number of problems in one single shot.

‘Better use of waste products’

Apart from producing a high value material with wide ranging industrial and household applications from an agricultural waste, it aids in significantly reducing water used for cleaning. Besides, it has the potential to replace toxic substances-based paints that are normally used.
Their work appeared online recently in the journal Progress in Organic Coating.
For making this novel coating material, the researchers first extracted nano-silica particles that are present in rice husk by burning the husk at high temperatures. These nano-silica particles — that are nearly 250 nanometres (one nanometre is one-billionth of a metre) in size — is mixed with a solution of silicone oil and toulene, a commonly used solvent. The solution is now ready to be used for spray painting.
“The coating material can be used on a variety of surfaces including concrete, steel structures and even wood,” said Grewal, who joined SNU in 2015 after completing his PhD from the Indian Institute of Technology, Ropar and a post-doctoral degree from South Korea.
Description: https://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/science/boryg6/article29586283.ece/alternates/FREE_155/PhotographHarpreet-Singh-Grewal
Harpreet Singh Grewal

He said his team, which also included a colleague Harpreet Arora and Grewal's masters and doctoral students, was inspired to take up this work as they wanted to find a way to put locally available agricultural waste materials to a better use.
“The material has sufficient roughness and water-repelling properties that dust particles cannot remain on the coated surfaces for long. When very little quantity of water is sprayed, water droplets will roll off these surfaces taking dust and other particles along with them, just like what happens when they fall on lotus leaves,” said Grewal.
“Our calculations show that for cleaning one square inch surface, we just need 30 to 40 microlitres (one microlitre is one millionth of a litre) of water, which is 5 to 10 times lesser quantity of water needed for conventional cleaning,” he said.

Inexpensive material

Moreover, the coating is non-toxic unlike lead- or chromium-based paints and can be applied on all household appliances, buildings, automobiles and industrial components. Besides, it’s been found to be very durable,” said Grewal, whose team carried out this research under a project sponsored by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research.
Even though the scientists did not ascertain the cost of the coating material, it may not be very expensive, according to Grewal. “My hunch is that we may be able to produce 1 litre of material for 50 to 100,” he said, adding that 20 to 30 kg of nano-silica can be produced from 100 kg of rice husk.
In the immediate future, the scientists want to see whether similar hard protective coverings found in wheat can help produce nano-silica, apart from finding a replacement solvent for toluene, which is a by-product of fossil fuel


New Eco-Friendly Ingredients Developed from Agricultural Waste

BY ANTHONY FLATT ON OCTOBER 3, 2019
Description: New Eco-Friendly Ingredients Developed from Agricultural WasteA scientist has found a manner of utilizing one of many world’s most plentiful pure sources as a substitute for human made chemical compounds in soaps and 1000’s of different family merchandise.
A revolutionary analysis mission, printed this month and led by the College of Portsmouth, has demonstrated that bails of rice straw might create a ‘biosurfacant’, offering another non-toxic ingredient within the manufacturing of an enormous number of merchandise that usually embody artificial supplies which are sometimes petroleum primarily based.
The biotechnology challenge got down to resolve one of many planet’s most urgent environmental issues, on the lookout for a method of decreasing the quantity of human made chemical compounds in on a regular basis life. It has been co-supervised by the University of Portsmouth’s Centre for Enzyme Innovation, working at the side of Amity University in India and the Indian Institute of Technology.
The research was in search of a pure alternative for chemical surfactants, a primary lively ingredient within the manufacturing of cleansing merchandise, drugs, sun cream, make-up and pesticides. The surfactant holds oil and water collectively, serving to decrease the floor tension of a liquid, aiding the cleansing energy and penetration of the product.
Dr Pattanathu Rahman, microbial biotechnologist from the University of Portsmouth and Director of TeeGene, labored with lecturers and PhD Scholar Mr Sam Joy from 2015 to create a biosurfacant by brewing rice straw with enzymes. The scientists imagine this environmentally pleasant methodology ends in a high quality ingredient that manufacturing industries are crying out for.
The research exhibits that biosurfactants may very well be a possible various for the artificial surfactant molecules, with a market worth of $US2.8 billion in 2023. The appreciable curiosity in biosurfactants lately can be attributable to their low toxicity, biodegradable nature and specificity, which might assist them meet the European Surfactant Directive. Dr Rahman says the method of manufacturing biosurfacants calls for brand new attitudes to soap and cleansing merchandise.

A $68 million initiative nurtured at Rice aims to reduce newborn deaths by half in sub-Saharan Africa

The program will focus on new technology, distribution, training and infrastructure


The international global health initiative NEST360° launched in London on Oct. 4, 2019 plans to reduce newborn deaths in sub-Saharan African hospitals by 50 percent with $68 million in philanthropic funding. (Photo by Brandon Martin/Rice University)
By Alexandra Becker | October 3, 2019
Rice University bioengineers Maria Oden, Ph.D., and Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Ph.D. in Houston are among the scientists and researchers who have announced a global health initiative that aims to reduce newborn deaths in sub-Saharan Africa by 50 percent.
NEST 360° is an international collaboration between Rice University’s Rice 360° Institute for Global Health as well as numerous partners across the globe including the Malawi College of Medicine, the Malawi Polytechnic, and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The news, announced on Oct. 4, 2019 in London, is that the program has secured $68 million in funding for the first of two four-year phases. The first phase is focused on Malawi, Tanzania, Kenya and Nigeria. The second-phase resources will be directed to Ethiopia, Uganda, Ghana and the Ivory Coast.
The philanthropic support will allow NEST 360° teams to attack the problem broadly and systematically.
“We have 13 partner institutions, nine of which are in Africa, and we’re addressing all of the key gaps—not only technology gaps with innovation, but the human resources gap, the implementation data gap—where we are really going to understand what it takes to successfully implement solutions for comprehensive newborn care for small and sick babies—and we’ll also be able to look at the market issues, the distribution gap,” Oden said.
Rice University bioengineers Maria Oden (second from left) and Rebecca Richards-Kortum (second from right) observe as Malawi College of Medicine pediatrician Josephine Langton (left) speaks with the mother of a baby receiving CPAP therapy at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi in 2016. Oden and Richards-Kortum co-founded the Rice 360° Institute for Global Health, which developed the rugged, low-cost neonatal CPAP machine used at the hospital. (Photo by Brandon Martin/Rice University)
The announcement comes on the heels of a study published this month by the journal Pediatricswhich confirmed that technology developed through the Rice 360° Institute for Global Health is saving newborn lives in Malawi, which currently has the highest rate of preterm births in the world. The Houston-based Rice 360° institute was co-founded by Oden and Richards-Kortum.
Every year, an estimated 15 million babies worldwide are born preterm. Complications resulting from these early births are the leading cause of death among children under five years of age, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).
But preterm birth doesn’t have to be fatal. More than 75 percent of babies who are born premature can be saved with the right medical care, which is why the fatality rate is disproportionately high in low-resource settings that often lack lifesaving technology or infrastructure. The WHO reports that Africa and South Asia account for more than 60 percent of the world’s preterm births.
The team at Rice 360°, in collaboration with clinicians and students in Malawi, have been working to reduce those numbers through the creation of critical neonatal technologies tailored to low-resource environments. One of the many challenges facing those working to solve global health problems is the need for technology that is able to withstand harsh environments. For example, rural hospitals may not have reliable electricity, spare parts or the necessary resources to keep a complex machine functioning.
One of the institute’s first products was the Pumani CPAP machine, a continuous positive airway pressure device that is low cost, durable, user-friendly and highly effective in delivering much-needed oxygen to newborns in respiratory distress. After a nurse-led, nationwide rollout of the Pumani CPAP in Malawi—which was supported by a grant from Saving Lives at Birth—the study looked at babies born at 26 Malawi government hospitals between 2013 and 2016. The research team was comprised of individuals from the Malawi Ministry of Health, Malawi’s leading medical school, its corresponding teaching hospital and Rice 360°.
The researchers found that use of the Pumani CPAP improved survival rates from 49 percent to 55 percent for newborns in respiratory distress. For newborns experiencing severe breathing problems, survival rose from 40 percent to 48 percent.
Neonatal nurse Florence Mwenifumbo monitors a newborn that is receiving bubble CPAP treatment at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. (Photo courtesy of Rice 360°/Rice University)
“The study validates the idea that newborns in this environment, and the system, can be impacted by putting the appropriate technologies alongside the appropriate trainings and technical knowledge to maintain and repair that equipment—that when you do all of those things, you can have a positive impact on newborn survival,” said Oden, co-director of Rice 360°and a NEST 360° co-founder.
The findings also reaffirmed the institute’s belief that there is more work to be done and that impacting preterm survival on a much larger scale will require more than one new technology at a time, Oden added. The study also found that babies using the CPAP whose body temperatures were below the normal range had a much lower survival rate than babies with normal temperatures who used the CPAP.
“We were able to see differences in survival based on babies’ temperatures and it reminded us that what that baby needs is comprehensive care. One technology at a time is not going to improve the neonatal survival in Africa to the point that it is in more developed countries,” Oden said. “It is really going to take working within the system and delivering a package, a bundle of care, where we really address all of the primary pathways of care that that baby needs in order to make a difference. And to do that, it includes the technology, it includes the human resources and it includes really understanding how to implement that effectively in that environment.”
She stressed that in order to make a real and lasting impact, partnerships will be key.
“One of the great things about the CPAP scale-up was that while the Rice team had worked with the Malawians to develop the technology, the scale-up really became a program within the government system,” Oden said. “This work is really in partnership with local clinicians and local governments. To me that is the linchpin of what will make this sustainable. We’re not aiming to be a project that will be over in four years, but a program that will embed itself within the ministries of health and finance in all of these countries.”
Click here to read more about bioengineer Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Ph.D., who is a 2016 MacArthur “Genius” Grant Fellow and was profiled in 2018 by TMC News.

In Gombe, boy, 17, kills own friend because of fired-rice cake

Abdulrazaq Mungadi, Gombe
Officers attached to Gombe Division of Gombe State police command have arrested a 17-year-old Abubakar Abdullahi of Anguwar Idi in Gombe metropolis in a case of culpable homicide.
According to the command’s spokesperson, Obed Mary Malum, the suspect allegedly used a knife to stab and kill 15-year-old Yusuf, Abubakar Sulaiman, over a disagreement on sharing of “Masa” a locally-prepared rice cake.
Recounting his ordeal, Abubakar told our correspondent that he never intended to kill his victim rather it just happened. He said: “The argument was between my brother and his younger brother which resulted in the beating of my brother who shared the food.
“I went to inquire about why was my brother beaten and it resulted in a fight. I had a knife on me which I recovered from my tailoring shop a night before the incident. So I used it to stab him in his chest,” Abubakar confessed.
He further explained that his father took him and reported him to the police even before the victim who had been treated could be confirmed dead.
The Police Public Relations Officer who paraded Abubakar alongside 15 other suspects revealed that the knife the assailant used to murder the victim had been recovered and that case was under investigation, adding that the  suspect would soon be charged to court.
She further explained that 35-year-old Joshua Anthony of Boshikiri Guyuk Local Government Area of Adamawa State was also arrested by the operatives from the Gombe Division in a case of criminal conspiracy and armed robbery.
“The suspect confessed that on 7th August 2019, he hired one Sini Danzaria, aged 17 years of Federal Lowcost, Gombe a commercial motorcyclist to convey him to Tumfure quarters. But on reaching at a point at Rainbow Roundabout, Gombe, he used a hammer and hit the victim on the head. Thinking that the victim was dead, he dragged him into a gutter and made away with his Bajaj motorcycle, valued N230,000, two phones valued N56,000,” SP Obed Malum said.
She added: “Investigation further revealed that he gave one of the phones to his 30-year-old girlfriend,  Victoria Sabo of Numan LGA of Adamawa State and sold the motorcycle at Garba Chede Bali LGA of Taraba State. The suspect was trailed through his girlfriend by tracking her phone which led to his subsequent arrest at Demsa LGA of Adamawa State through the resilience of the crack operatives from Gombe Division.”
Other suspects paraded included the suspected kidnapper of a 7-year-old schoolboy, rapists among other criminals.

California Tour Encourages Trade with Turkey  

SACRAMENTO, CA- - Last week, a group of rice and pulse traders from Turkey toured California rice country during a reverse trade mission sponsored by USA Rice, the Nebraska Dry Bean Commission, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) based in Ankara.

The California Rice Commission provided the group with an overview of the U.S. rice industry, and conducted tours of nearby farms and mills, and USA Rice hosted a dinner reception where members of the U.S. rice industry exporting California rice as well as Southern medium grain were present to discuss the market situation and potential for U.S. rice sales in the future.

"Turkey has been a difficult market over the past two years," said Sarah Moran, USA Rice vice president international.  "As a result of the ongoing trade war, Turkey imposed retaliatory tariffs of an additional 50 percent on all types of U.S. rice last summer.  These tariffs were reduced to 25 percent in August and, while it's definitely a step in the right direction, these measures still limit U.S. rice sales to this market."

U.S. rice sales to Turkey have dropped drastically -- 1,200 MT in 2019, and 1,100 MT in 2018, compared to 240,000 MT in 2014, and more than 100,000 MT in 2015.  Local consumers still have a preference for U.S. rice, however, other origins have started to penetrate the marketplace including Greek, Portuguese, Chinese, Russian, and Italian, as they can enter Turkey at a lower tariff rate than U.S. origin.

"The only entity who can import rice at zero duty to Turkey is the Turkish Grain Board (TMO) and USA Rice is currently working on developing relationships with this organization to better understand their tendering requirements and to facilitate increased U.S. rice sales there," said Moran.

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Iraqi Delegation Goes to the Source for Recent U.S. Rice Sales 

LAKE CHARLES, LA -- Last week, USA Rice hosted a delegation of seven officials from Iraq's Ministry of Trade for a meeting with U.S. rice exporters.  The team, led by Deputy Minister for Economic Affairs Haitham Al-Khshali, discussed ways to ensure continued trade between the two countries including improved rice quality, technical trainings, and investments into Iraq.

The governments of Iraq and the U.S. signed a rice memorandum of understanding (MOU) in 2016 that has led to U.S. specific tenders for rice; 300,000 MT of U.S. rice has been purchased over the past three years.


"We expressed our appreciation for the Ministry recently extending the MOU for another three years, which will further deepen the relationship between our two countries," said Bobby Hanks, who attended the meeting and is chair of the USA Rice International Trade Policy Committee.

The team visited the Port of Lake Charles, where they were welcomed by Port Director Bill Rase, and toured the Port's facilities to watch rice, which the Ministry purchased several months ago, being loaded onto a vessel destined for Iraq.



RIMAN Commends Closure of Borders to Curtail Rice Smuggling By Peter Dama -Posted: 18 hours ago6544 imported rice RIMAN Commends Closure of Borders to Curtail Rice Smuggling The Rice Millers Association of Nigeria (RIMAN), commends and support President Buhari over the closure of Nigerian Borders in order to check mate the importation and smuggling of foreign rice into the country, in addition to other illegal goods. 2. The Federal Government’s decision to close the borders is in the best interest of the country as this will enhance more production and milling of Nigerian Rice; that will bring about job creation, poverty alleviation and boosting generally of the Nigerian Economy. 3.
 Following the closer of the borders Nigerian Local Rice now floods across the country, moribund rice milling factories have started operating in full capacity all over, thereby creating Jobs for the teaming unemployed youthful Nigerians. 4. Nigerians are now purchasing and eating fresh quality nutritious, healthy and tasty Nigeria Rice as against foreign rice that has been stored in silos for over five years with chemicals which leads to unexplained development of different diseases e.g. cancer that afflicts Nigerians. 5. With the increase demand of Nigerian Rice, as a result of this closure and good patronage of Nigerian Rice, RIMAN therefore urges the Nigerian Government to sustain the border closure for the Development of the country’s rice value chain. The boarders be reopened only when there are diplomatic solutions to rice smuggling into Nigeria. 6. RIMAN also calls on Nigerian Local Rice consumers to be patriotic by patronizing only Nigerian Rice as this will further help the country in reaching self-sufficiency in local rice production. 7. RIMAN condemns completely, the criticism by some senators, on the decision of the government to close the borders as their stand doesn’t seem patriotic. Rather we members of Rice Millers Association of Nigeria – RIMAN, commend Senator Adamu Aleiro and eight other Senators who sponsored the motion “The impact of boarder closure on Nigerian Economy”, Which resolved to support the president over the border closure.
On this note, RIMAN believes that the Senators and the Senate that upheld this motion are behind the people of this country and believe in the slogan of the Administration that says “We must eat what we produce”. 8. Rice Millers Association of Nigeria again call on the Federal Government not to succumb to any black mail or pressure to give in on the call to reopen the closed borders. 9. RIMAN further commends and acknowledge all the efforts of Nigerian Security agencies for a Job well done at manning our boarders against smuggling. 10. However, RIMAN will appreciate if all the secret routes being used by smugglers are identified by the government and properly blocked in spite of its porous nature. We also suggest that technology be imported and deployed to man the country’s porous borders. Signed Peter Dama Chairman, RIMAN – Rice Millers Association of Nigeria p.dama@yahoo.com

Read more at: https://prnigeria.com/2019/10/03/riman-commends-closure-borders/

Rice shellers issue: NPRMA delegation meets director food supplies, seeks redressal of problems

Punjab News Express | October 03, 2019 06:39 PM
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CHANDIGARH: A delegation of the New Punjab Rice Millers Association (NPRMA), led by state trade wing chief of the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and the interim president-designate of the  NPRMA, Neena Mittal on Thursday met the director of food and supplies, Punjab, seeking redressal of a series of the problems they were currently wrestling with amid the paddy season already under way in the state.

In a statement issued from party headquarters on Thursday, Neena Mittal said that a whopping amount of more than Rs 1000 crore was outstanding against the procurement agencies for the year that was, terming it as a deep-rooted conspiracy of the government to ruin the sheller industry.

Others who were a part of the delegation included, Rakesh Singla, Raman Jindal, Vijay Jindal, Mukesh Kumar, Rimpi Mittal, Rattan Garg, Surinder Garg Hardev Singh and state media head of the party.

The delegation stated that after the milling process, about 115 lakh metric tonnes of rice was expected to be produced from the paddy likely to be procured this season. The government had set the deadline as March 31, 2020 under the new custom policy, by which sheller owners won’t be able to deliver the produce in view of 12 per cent rate of interest, saying that only 18 lakh metric tonnes space for storage of rice was currently available in govt go-downs/ warehouses across the state as against the required capacity of at least 70 lakh metric tonnes.

While the director made it clear that no interest would be incurred if there was no sufficient space available for the storage of rice in the state warehouses. She, however, assured of taking up the matter with the union government for redressal.

The delegation said that under the new policy, the security amount has been raised to Rs 5 lakhs (Non-refundable), which would incur an additional financial on the seller sheller owners in the state.

Mittal said that Anandita Mishra had assured the payment of dues, the process for which had already started in various districts and that in the next 2-4 days, the outstanding balance amount would be cleared. Mittal said that the government had failed to provide the required space in the state warehouses, while the neighboring state of Haryana had sufficient space in its go-downs for the storage of rice.

The AAP leader said that if the government failed to take an urgent call on the problem being faced by the sheller owners, it would have its bearings on the mandi laborers, artiyas and transporters during the peak paddy season, the association in tandem with AAP would ‘gherao’ the government.

OCTOBER 3, 2019 / 5:32 PM / UPDATED A DAY AGO
Asia Rice-Waning demand prompts Indian, Thai exporters to lower prices
Karthika Suresh Namboothiri

Thai rates more expensive than competitors
* India prices ease to $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375
* Philippines mulls safeguard duty on rice imports
* Fresh floods submerge farm land in Bangladesh
By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri
BENGALURU, Oct 3 (Reuters) - Rice export rates in Asian hubs fell this week as weak demand and currency fluctuations prompted sellers in India and Thailand to cut prices, while expectations of lower interest from the Philippines weighed on the Vietnamese market.
Thailand’s benchmark 5% broken rice RI-THBKN5-P1 prices were quoted slightly lower at $396-$417 a tonne versus last week’s $400-$420.
“Exporters have to lower prices to lure buyers,” a Bangkok-based rice trader said adding: “I’ve not been able to sell any rice for two months now.”
Thai exporters have struggled since the start of the year as the baht, which has been Asia’s best performing currency this year, has kept Thai prices higher than those of competitors India and Vietnam.
“There could be a possible deal for parboiled rice from African markets ahead of Christmas, and perhaps some demand from China and other Asian markets for jasmine rice towards the end of the year,” another Bangkok-based trader said
“But as of now there is simply no major demand due to our high prices.”
Prices of top exporter India’s 5% broken parboiled variety RI-INBKN5-P1 also extended losses, dipping to around $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375 a week ago on a weak rupee and subdued demand.
“Demand is weak. Traders are waiting for the new season crop,” said an exporter based at Kakinada in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.
Indian rice exports in April-July plunged 26.5% from a year ago to 3.14 million tonnes, a government body said last month, on subdued demand for non-basmati rice from Africa.
In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice RI-VNBKN5-P1 were quoted at $330-$340 a tonne, free on board, compared with $335 a week earlier. Prices had plunged to a near 12-year low of about $325 in the week to Sept. 19.
“We are concerned that exports to Philippines will decline as it is seeking to limit rice imports to protect local farmers,” a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.
Philippines, one of the world’s biggest rice importers, may consider imposing a safeguard duty on rice to ease the pain of local farmers hurting from a surge in imports.
Vietnam’s rice shipments in the first nine months of 2019 likely rose 4.5% to 5.1 million tonnes, but export revenue was expected to drop 9.7% in the same period.
Elsewhere, a heavy spell of retreating monsoon rains has submerged vast swathe of farmland in low-lying Bangladesh, still recovering from previous floods.
Floods in July washed away crops that would have yielded nearly 400,000 tonnes of rice, agriculture ministry estimates showed.
“If the water recedes soon, it won’t have much impact on paddy crops,” an agriculture ministry official said. (Reporting by Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Ruma Paul in Dhaka and Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai; editing by Arpan Varghese and David Evans

Lena Dunham's breakup food diary that led to extreme weight loss

3 Oct, 2019 9:09am
Description: The actress has opened up about her extreme weight loss after her ex 'barely touched her'. Photo / Getty Images
The actress has opened up about her extreme weight loss after her ex 'barely touched her'. Photo / Getty Images
BANG! Showbiz
Lena Dunham says she lost "a lot of weight" after her split from Jack Antonoff.
Lena has written a food diary for ELLE UK, and she told the publication: "It happened, like many things, at first slowly and then all at once.
"It started with a stomach infection that necessitated a diet of basmati rice and bottles of Pedialyte (didn't hate it).
"Then came the 2016 election, when we all either started or stopped eating en masse."
She added: "Sadness is the only thing that's ever made me lose weight.
"Two years ago, during the last gasps of my six-year relationship, I lost weight.
Description: The Girls star dated the Bleachers musician for nearly six years until their split in December 2017. Photo / Getty ImagesThe Girls star dated the Bleachers musician for nearly six years until their split in December 2017. Photo / Getty Images
"Not a little weight. Not the kind of weight where your bras feel kind of generous and you marvel at your subtle but oh-wow-it's-definitely-there-now clavicle. No, it was a lot of weight."
The 33-year-old actress found it bizarre that she didn't pile on the pounds like most women do after a breakup.
She said: "At the end of that relationship, the weight was falling off in double digits but, as I explained to my closest friends, I experienced none of the heady triumph of the women showing off their formerly-huge jeans in a full page ad for weight-loss pills."
The writer also revealed that she "very quickly" found a new "lover" after their split.

She recalled: "When my boyfriend and I broke up, I very quickly took a lover.
"He was someone I had known from childhood and he was, in many ways, exactly as I remembered him: goofy and physical, boyish and sweet. I went from being touched barely at all to being the very definition of touch."
Lena also did a stint in rehab and once she was weaned off drugs she started to feel "real hungry".
She said: "It took a week, but as the drugs left my body and I made peace with the fact that I was here to heal, not just to cut my own bangs and weep (just kidding: you can't cut your own bangs because they won't give you scissors). I got real hungry, real fast. If it wasn't nailed down, I ate it."
The 'Once Upon a Time In Hollywood' star says meat pies are her "ecstasy" and the only thing that can "comfort" her other than her mum and she claims the savoury treat keeps her "alive".

The devil in the rice detail

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:28 AM October 04, 2019
Though rice tariffication is much better than the quantitative restrictions implemented by the government-led import monopoly, the devil is in the 35-percent level.
Two years ago, we wrote about how the tariff level should be fair—neither siding with the importers nor the local producers. We said this would be good for consumers and challenge local producers, who would have to be efficient or else perish in the process.
At that time, we quoted  a Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) study that suggested 70 percent as the tariff level that would level the playing field for both imported and domestic rice. A 35-percent level would be preferable.
But to be fair, the government should first give the farmers the necessary support measures to enable them to compete. A suggested road map with details such as the areas where other crops could be diverted and the budget needed was never implemented.
The government was correct in implementing the 35-percent tariff because it was a commitment to the World Trade Organization. But what the government missed was the safeguards provided by the WTO itself and our very own Republic Act 8800 or Safeguard Measures Act.
On Aug. 13, the Alyansa Agrikultura officially asked for safeguard measures because imports had already ballooned to 2.4 million tons, or twice our annual import requirement.
We expect imports to have reached 3 million tons in September. And more should be coming in  because a tariff level enough to safeguard our own produce has been delayed.
A rice disaster is already happening. Farm-gate prices of wet palay now average P11.62 per kilo in Region II, P12.41 in Region III and P12 in Region VI.
Since the average production cost is P12, we will see huge losses on a large scale and the demise of the rice industry unless the safeguard is implemented soon.
In my doctoral dissertation on the successful transfer of a system to a real world setting, I said there was a need for preparation.
Critical elements must be present, such as the provision of necessary facilities, the required infrastructure and a supportive business and socioeconomic  environment.
These elements are not present for the success of the 35-percent tariff.
To say that farmers can immediately shift from rice to other crops without the necessary support mechanisms is foolhardy, irresponsible and dangerous.
Agriculture Secretary William Dar should be commended for taking the bold step of initiating the safeguard measure investigations weeks ago, despite strong opposition that has delayed the necessary actions.
Food security, instead of food self-sufficiency, is our objective. But we must survive this crisis to get there.
In the late 1990s, our agriculture and farmers suffered severely when we implemented the WTO-suggested rapid tariff reduction without the WTO-approved safeguard measures.
This could happen again.
A well-known personality in another field said: “You cannot make the same mistake twice.  The second time you make it, it is not a mistake anymore. It’s a choice. Enough.”
If the safeguards are not implemented immediately, the rice farmers may well behave in undesirable ways and say, “Enough.”
We must therefore attend to this rice detail before anything unfortunate occurs.
PhilRice's 'Lakbay Palay' kicks off in N. Ecija
By Marilyn Galang  October 3, 2019, 7:38 pm
Description: https://files.pna.gov.ph/category-list/2019/10/03/philrice-lakbay-palay.jpg
ENHANCING FARMERS' COMPETITIVENESS. Farmers, extension workers and other rice stakeholders register to participate in the 'Lakbay Palay' event of the Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) in the Science City of Muñoz, Nueva Ecija. The bi-annual event that kicked off on Thursday (Oct. 3, 2019) aims to teach new technologies that will increase the farmers’ rice yield while reducing production costs. (Photo by Philippine Rice Research Institute)
SCIENCE CITY OF MUNOZ, Nueva Ecija -- The Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice) has started to equip farmers with the necessary knowledge and information to help them cope with the challenges of the rice trade liberation.
During the "Lakbay Palay" event that kicked off on Thursday at the PhilRice compound here, projects under the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund (RCEF) program were introduced to the farmers in an effort to help them become at par with their counterparts from neighboring countries.
Dr. Flordeliza H. Bordey, PhilRice deputy executive director and RCEF program director, said this year’s "Lakbay Palay" will focus on technologies that would increase the farmers’ rice yield while reducing production costs.
Bordey said the seed component which will work on the promotion, propagation and development of certified inbred seeds will be discussed to the farmers.
Likewise, she said that experts from the Philippine Center for Postharvest Development and Mechanization, Landbank of the Philippines, Development Bank of the Philippines, and Agricultural Training Institute will discuss free machines, loans, and trainings.
“Experts will also teach farmers on vegetable, mushroom, and lotus production, Sorjan system, crops and livestock integration, and buffalo raising,” she said.
Bordey added that PhilRice technologies such as capillarization and "kwebo" will also be showcased.
"Lakbay Palay" is a bi-annual event for farmers, extension workers, students, and other rice stakeholders. (PNA)

Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open- October 03, 2019
OCTOBER 3, 2019
* * * * * *
Nagpur Foodgrain Prices – APMC/Open Market-October 3, 2018 Nagpur, Oct 3 (Reuters) – Gram prices firmed up in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) here increased festival season demand from local millers amid tight supply from producing regions. Healthy rise on NCDEX, upward trend in Madhya Pradesh gram prices and reported demand from South-based millers also helped to push up prices. About 300 bags of gram reported for auction, according to sources.

GRAM
* Desi gram reported higher in open market on good seasonal demand from local traders.

TUAR
* Tuar Karnataka showed weak tendency in open market here on lack of demand from

local traders.

* Lakhodi dal reported down in open market here on lack of demand from local traders.

* In Akola, Tuar New – 5,500-5,700, Tuar dal (clean) – 8,100-8,200, Udid Mogar (clean)

– 7,600-8,500, Moong Mogar (clean) 8,200-8,900, Gram – 4,300-4,400, Gram Super best

– 5,600-6,000 * Wheat, rice and other foodgrain items moved in a narrow range in

scattered deals and settled at last levels in thin trading activity.

Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg

FOODGRAINS Available prices Previous close

Gram Auction 3,700-4,290 3,700-4,240

Gram Pink Auction n.a. 2,100-2,600

Tuar Auction n.a. 5,075-5,280

Moong Auction n.a. 3,950-4,200

Udid Auction n.a. 4,300-4,500

Masoor Auction n.a. 2,200-2,500

Wheat Lokwan Auction 1,950-2,070 2,000-2,030

Wheat Sharbati Auction n.a. 2,900-3,000

Gram Super Best Bold 6,000-6,200 6,000-6,200

Gram Super Best n.a. n.a.

Gram Medium Best 5,700-5,900 5,700-5,900

Gram Dal Medium n.a. n.a

Gram Mill Quality 4,450-4,550 4,450-4,550

Desi gram Raw 4,450-4,500 4,400-4,450

Gram Kabuli 8,300-10,000 8,300-10,000

Tuar Fataka Best-New 8,300-8,400 8,300-8,400

Tuar Fataka Medium-New 7,800-8,100 7,800-8,100

Tuar Dal Best Phod-New 7,400-7,700 7,400-7,700

Tuar Dal Medium phod-New 6,800-7,300 6,800-7,300

Tuar Gavarani New 5,650-5,750 5,650-5,750

Tuar Karnataka 5,950-6,050 6,000-6,100

Masoor dal best 5,400-5,700 5,400-5,700

Masoor dal medium 5,100-5,300 5,100-5,300

Masoor n.a. n.a.

Moong Mogar bold (New) 8,500-9,000 8,500-9,000

Moong Mogar Medium 7,000-7,800 7,000-7,800

Moong dal Chilka New 7,200-7,800 7,200-7,800

Moong Mill quality n.a. n.a.

Moong Chamki best 8,500-8,900 8,500-8,900

Udid Mogar best (100 INR/KG) (New) 7,800-8,800 7,800-8,800

Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) 6,000-7,000 6,000-7,000

Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG) 4,700-5,300 4,700-5,300

Mot (100 INR/KG) 6,000-7,000 6,000-7,000

Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg) 4,600-4,900 4,800-5,100

Watana Dal (100 INR/KG) 4,750-4,900 4,750-4,900

Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) 6,850-7,100 6,850-7,100

Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG) 2,250-2,350 2,250-2,350

Wheat Mill quality (100 INR/KG) 2,100-2,200 2,100-2,200

Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG) 2,650-2,750 2,650-2,750

Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG) 2,550-2,650 2,550-2,650

Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) 2,300-2,450 2,300-2,450

Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a.

MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 3,200-4,000 3,200-4,000

MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,600-3,100 2,600-3,100

Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG) 2,400-2,500 2,400-2,500

Rice BPT best new (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,600 3,200-3,600

Rice BPT medium new(100 INR/KG) 2,700-3,100 2,700-3,100

Rice Luchai (100 INR/KG) 3,000-3,100 3,000-3,100

Rice Swarna best new (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,700 2,500-2,700

Rice Swarna medium new (100 INR/KG)2,300-2,400 2,300-2,400

Rice HMT best new (100 INR/KG) 3,800-4,000 3,800-4,000

Rice HMT medium new (100 INR/KG) 3,300-3,500 3,300-3,500

Rice Shriram best new(100 INR/KG) 4,600-5,000 4,600-5,000

Rice Shriram med new (100 INR/KG) 4,200-4,500 4,200-4,500

Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 8,500-13,500 8,500-13,500

Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,000-7,200 5,000-7,200

Rice Chinnor best new 100 INR/KG) 5,400-5,700 5,400-5,700

Rice Chinnor medium new(100 INR/KG)5,100-5,200 5,100-5,200

Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) 2,350-2,550 2,350-2,550

Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG) 2,050-2,250 2,050-2,250 WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 33.1 degree Celsius, minimum temp. 22.3 degree Celsius Rainfall : Nil FORECAST: Generally cloudy sky with one or two spells of rains or thunder-showers. Maximum and minimum temperature likely to be around 33 degree Celsius and 22 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.—not available (For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices)

Cambodia's rice export to China up 44 pct in 9 months

Source: Xinhua| 2019-10-03 19:25:03|Editor: Xiang Bo
PHNOM PENH, Oct. 3 (Xinhua) -- Cambodia had exported 157,793 tons of milled rice to China during the first nine months of 2019, up 44 percent over the same period last year, said an official report on Thursday.
China remained the top buyer of Cambodian rice during the January-September period this year, said the report of the Secretariat of One Window Service for Rice Export.
The export to China accounted for 39.6 percent of the country's total rice export, it said.
Meanwhile, the Southeast Asian nation shipped 135,475 tons of rice to the European market, down 30 percent, said the report, adding that the European Union (EU)'s market share for Cambodian rice had declined to 34 percent from 49.7 percent.
The slump in the export to the European market came after the EU imposed earlier this year duties for three years on rice importing from Cambodia in a bid to curb a surge in rice imports from the country and to protect European producers.
According to the report, Cambodia exported a total of 398,586 tons of rice to 53 countries and regions across the globe during the first nine months of this year, up 2.3 percent over the same period last year.

RPT-Asia Rice-Waning demand prompts Indian, Thai exporters to lower prices
OCTOBER 4, 2019
Karthika Suresh Namboothiri

(Repeats with no changes)

* Thai rates more expensive than competitors

* India prices ease to $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375

* Philippines mulls safeguard duty on rice imports

* Fresh floods submerge farmland in Bangladesh

By Karthika Suresh Namboothiri

BENGALURU, Oct 3 (Reuters) - Rice export rates in Asian hubs fell this week as weak demand and currency fluctuations prompted sellers in India and Thailand to cut prices, while expectations of lower interest from the Philippines weighed on the Vietnamese market.

Thailand’s benchmark 5% broken rice RI-THBKN5-P1 prices were quoted slightly lower at $396-$417 a tonne versus last week’s $400-$420.

“Exporters have to lower prices to lure buyers,” a Bangkok-based rice trader said adding: “I’ve not been able to sell any rice for two months now.”

Thai exporters have struggled since the start of the year as the baht, which has been Asia’s best performing currency this year, has kept Thai prices higher than those of competitors India and Vietnam.

“There could be a possible deal for parboiled rice from African markets ahead of Christmas, and perhaps some demand from China and other Asian markets for jasmine rice towards the end of the year,” another Bangkok-based trader said

“But as of now there is simply no major demand due to our high prices.”

Prices of top exporter India’s 5% broken parboiled variety RI-INBKN5-P1 also extended losses, dipping to around $369-$373 per tonne from $371-$375 a week ago on a weak rupee and subdued demand.

“Demand is weak. Traders are waiting for the new season crop,” said an exporter based at Kakinada in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh.

Indian rice exports in April-July plunged 26.5% from a year ago to 3.14 million tonnes, a government body said last month, on subdued demand for non-basmati rice from Africa.

In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice RI-VNBKN5-P1 were quoted at $330-$340 a tonne, free on board, compared with $335 a week earlier. Prices had plunged to a near 12-year low of about $325 in the week to Sept. 19.

“We are concerned that exports to Philippines will decline as it is seeking to limit rice imports to protect local farmers,” a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said.

Philippines, one of the world’s biggest rice importers, may consider imposing a safeguard duty on rice to ease the pain of local farmers hurting from a surge in imports.

Vietnam’s rice shipments in the first nine months of 2019 likely rose 4.5% to 5.1 million tonnes, but export revenue was expected to drop 9.7% in the same period.

Elsewhere, a heavy spell of retreating monsoon rains has submerged vast swathe of farmland in low-lying Bangladesh, still recovering from previous floods.

Floods in July washed away crops that would have yielded nearly 400,000 tonnes of rice, agriculture ministry estimates showed.

“If the water recedes soon, it won’t have much impact on paddy crops,” an agriculture ministry official said. (Reporting by Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Ruma Paul in Dhaka and Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai; editing by Arpan Varghese and David Evans)
Farming group seeks 70% rice tariff
OCTOBER 03, 2019
FARMING GROUP SEEKS 70% RICE TARIFF
THE Philippine Chamber of Agriculture and Food Inc. (PCAFI) is urging the government to impose a rice tariff of at least 70 percent to arrest record-high rice imports that have caused a severe drop in local farmers’ produce.

In a statement on Wednesday, PCAFI President Danilo Fausto warned that the continuous influx of cheap rice imports, which has so far reached 2.4 million metric tons (MMT) since the passage of the Rice Tariffication Law in February, might force local farmers in  rural areas to resort to joining communist rebels.
He said the tariff protection under safeguards would serve as a “temporary, transitory” policy.
“A tariff rate of at least 70 percent should be reasonable enough to give the Filipino farmers, at least, [a] ‘temporary’ yet extra edge against imports,” Fausto said.
“[The Department of Agriculture] should immediately implement it as promised… while we’re trying to give our farmers time to upgrade their competitiveness,” he added.
PCAFI cited Republic Act 8800, or the “Safeguard Measures Act,” which says safeguards may be imposed, depending on conditions, such as the significant idling of productive facilities in the domestic industry, including the closure of plants (rice mills) or underutilization of production capacity and inability of a significant number of firms to carry out domestic production at a profit, which the group claimed “all of which conditions are reported to have been happening with the implementation of a liberalized rice regime.”
“We’re not asking for a repeal of the law or an amendment [to] the law. [And] if the law says [on] section 10 of the Republic Act there are safeguards, let’s implement it,” Fausto said.
Earlier, the Federation of Free Farmers (FFF) earlier expressed the same proposal to immediately impose special safeguard duties on rice imports, fearing that prices of the staple would further decrease as the main harvest season peaks next month.
FFF National Manager Raul Montemayor said 2.4 MMT rice imports is around 17 percent of the country’s total consumption requirement for 2019. Annually, the Philippines needs to import only 10 percent, given that the country is 90-percent rice self-sufficient.
This means there is already an excess supply of 7 percent in the market, he said, noting, that this “glut will become worse if more imports come in and coincide with the main season harvest.”
Montemayor also said that too much imported rice in the market would make local traders unable to unload their stocks at a profit, adjusting their buying price to compete with the cheaper imports — the reason palay (unmilled rice) prices fell

Growers Express Concern Over Use Of Pesticides On Food Crops


HYDERABAD, (APP - UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News - 3rd Oct, 2019 ) :The farmers and representatives of growers' bodies have expressed deep concerns over the application of hazardous pesticides over the crops like wheat, rice, vegetable and fruits Speaking at a workshop, organized by Swat Agro Chemical (SAC) here on Thursday, they demanded official inquiries into the sale and usage of such pesticides.
The farmers from 9 districts of Sindh, representatives of Sindh Chamber of Agriculture, officials of Sindh Agriculture Extension and Research and other growers' bodies participated in the daylong discussion.
The SCA's Vice President Nabi Bux Sathio said that authorized dealers should guide the farmers against using pesticides on rice, wheat, vegetable and fruits crops."The pesticides contain a foul smell and are harmful if consumed by the humans," he noted.
He referred to spray of Thimet on sugarcane and cotton, pointing out that China where it was manufactured had banned that pesticide but it was being sprayed in the US.
Sathio said if a farmer fell unconscious during spraying a pesticide than they should be given urgent medical help.He informed that he wrote a letter to Director GeneralSindh Agriculture Extension against poisonous pesticides soon after incidents that occurred in various parts of Sindh.
He told that 4 farmers died in LodhranPunjab, and many growers in SujawalThatta and Tando Mohammad Khan districts fell unconscious while applying the pesticides spray.
Syed Aijaz Nabi Shah, a farmers' representative, emphasized that the Field Assistants (FA) of Sindh Agriculture Department were responsible for guiding farmers about the health hazards of the pesticides.However, he lamented that not a single field assistant could be seen discharging their obligations in that regard.
"The FAs should be given proper training about all the pesticides and tasked to educate the growers," he suggested.
Abdul Karim Talpur, Agha Khadim Hussain Shah, Muhammad Aslam Marri, Mohammad Khan, Karim Bux Leghari and other farmers also shared their experiences about the use of pesticides.
The SAC's business Manager Mohammad Arif, Technical Manager Tauseef ur Rehman, Research and Development Officer Mohammad Asif delivered their joint presentations and took questions from the farmers.
Rice exports bring home 2.24 billion USD in nine months
Vietnam shipped abroad 586,000 tonnes of rice in September for 251 million USD, pushing the total rice export volume and value in the first nine months of this year to 5.2 million tonnes and 2.24 billion USD, respectively.
VNA Friday, October 04, 2019 10:11 
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Description: Rice exports bring home 2.24 billion USD in nine months hinh anh 1Illustrative image (Source: VNA)

Hanoi (VNA) – Vietnam shipped abroad 586,000 tonnes of rice in September for 251 million USD, pushing the total rice export volume and value in the first nine months of this year to 5.2 million tonnes and 2.24 billion USD, respectively.

According to the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), the figures represented a rise of 5.9 percent in volume and a drop of 9.8 percent in value compared to the same period in 2018.

The Philippines was the top market for Vietnamese rice in the first eight months of this year, consuming 1.76 million tonnes worth 720 million USD, 2.9 times higher in volume and 2.6 times in value over the same period last year.

Strong growth was also seen in other markets, including Australia (75 percent), Ivory Coast (nearly 35 percent), and Hong Kong (nearly 35 percent).

The average rice price in the first eight months of 2018 fell 13.8 percent year on year to 435 USD per tonne.

White rice led the way in the period, accounting for 47 percent of total revenue, followed by Jasmine rice with 39.8 percent.

According to the Agro Processing and Market Development Authority (AgroTrade) under the MARD, the Philippine Government plans to diversify non-tariff measures to adjust rice import activities.

At the same time, the Philippine Department of Agriculture has also proposed the application of a defence tariff on imported rice at between 30-65 percent, which may affect Vietnam’s rice exports to the market in the future.

However, positive signals were seen in the Japanese market, which is considering switching rice imports from the US to signature countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), including Vietnam.

Meanwhile, Singapore has also shown more interest in rice from Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam./.

Government struggling to find space for fresh rice stock

Data from the FCI shows the combined stock of rice and wheat at more than 71 million tonnes.

Description: rice-gettyBy Rituraj Tiwari, ET Bureau|
Oct 02, 2019, 11.23 PM IST

NEW DELHI: The government is struggling to find storage space for expected rice stocks before procurement season starts this month, as granaries are overflowing and there is no plan to reduce stock.

“Storage is a big problem for us,” said a senior food ministry official, who did not wish to be identified. “Most of the procurement for the central pool happens in Punjab and Haryana, where godowns are brimming with grain. Since rice needs covered storage, unlike wheat that can be kept in makeshift plinth storage, there is a need to liquidate old stock to create space.”

Data from the Food Corporation of India (FCI), the agency that buys grains for the central pool for public distribution and other welfare schemes, shows the combined stock of rice and wheat at more than 71 million tonnes (mt), apart from 8 mt of unmilled paddy – the highest for August. This is almost three times the minimum stock needed to run welfare schemes.

National storage capacity is around 88 mt — 75 mt covered and 13 mt covered area plinth (CAP). “Around 75% of wheat procured from Punjab is stocked under CAP, which is partly exposed to rains and weather.

This time, more wheat will be exposed to rains as we expect heavy procurement,” said the official.

The liquidation of stock has become even more important as the cost of storage for FCI is increasing year by year. “FCI spent Rs 3,610 crore for foodgrain storage in 2017-18, which went up to Rs 4,358 crore in 2018-19. Cost is estimated to go up to Rs 5,201 crore in 2019-20. It makes sense to liquidate stock for some welfare programmes,” said another official.

In April, open auctions were launched for millers and biscuit manufacturers to dispose of 10 mt wheat and 5 mt rice from FCI godowns