Friday, July 12, 2019

12th July,2019 Daily Global Regional Local Rice E-Newsletter


B.O.C. to probe January-June rice imports

By Rea Cu
Description: https://39byfk2z09ab1y1bzj1l5r82-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/top01-011018-696x464.jpgPrices of assorted varieties of rice are seen at the San Andres public market in Manila in this file photo.
THE Bureau of Customs (BOC) said on Thursday that it will look into rice imports that arrived in the country from January to June, to determine if the shipments were undervalued.
BOC Assistant Commissioner for the Post Clearance Audit Group Vincent Philip C. Maronilla told the BusinessMirror in an interview that the values declared by traders were inconsistent.
Maronilla made the announcement after the BusinessMirror reported on July 9 (See,“Undervalued rice imports may have caused P5-billion gap in tariff collection,” Banking and Finance page) that the Federation of Free Farmers Inc. suspected the undervaluation of rice shipments by importers and traders.
“In terms of volume, [the shipments] look consistent [with the trend]. But in terms of value, we’ll have to admit, when we looked at the initial evaluation for the first half of the year, the values were inconsistent,” Maronilla said.
“And there were a lot who did not declare their transaction value, that is on a par with our reference, which is based on established and reputable publications on prices,” he added.
Maronilla said he may recommend to the BOC commissioner the
issuance of audit notification letters to traders and firms. The audit will be conducted by his office.
“If ever there was undervaluation of shipments, [the BOC] can recover the deficient duties and taxes plus, of course, the corresponding penalties and interests. It’s an instruction actually coming from the [BOC] commissioner to look into it and recommend if it’s warranted,” he added.
Maronilla said the audit notification letters may be sent out by the first week of August, after the bureau has collated and verified the data it collected.
He said the BOC has the power to collect duties and taxes if there were deficiencies in the assessment made on imported rice shipments. He noted that shipments are open for post-clearance audit for up to three years.
“If there is deficiency, the penalty is 125 percent plus 20-percent legal interest per annum to a high of 600 percent if fraud is attendant,” Maronilla said.
The Department of Finance (DOF) reported earlier that the BOC had collected P5.9 billion from tariffs slapped on 1.43 million metric tons (MMT) of rice imported by local traders from March 5 to June 30.
Maronilla clarified, however, that the tariffs were collected from shipments made in January to June. He added that the BOC’s report to the DOF was on the bureau’s performance for the first half of the year and not just for the March to June, when the new law was already in effect.
“[The collections] from March 5 to June, when the rice tariffication law is already in effect, were for 966,690 metric tons,” he said. Tariffs assessed on 966,690 MT of rice reached around P4 billion to P4.5 billion, according to Maronilla.
The BOC official also expressed confidence that the bureau’s collection of rice tariffs will surpass P10 billion, the amount that should be allocated annually to the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund ever year, under the new law.
FFF National Manager Raul Q. Montemayor said the tariffs collected by the BOC from 1.43 MMT of rice imported by traders were “quite small.”
According to FFF’s computation, the landed cost of the rice imports per metric ton would only be about $227 if one were to base this on the import and tariff collection figures released by the BOC, Montemayor said.
Image Credits: Roy Domingo

Chico State alumni make history; close first rice sale to China

Erin O’Donnell, a 2003 Chico State alum is the assistant vice president for Global Rice Trading Sun Valley Rice Co. COURTESY
PUBLISHED: July 11, 2019 at 6:50 am | UPDATED: July 11, 2019 at 6:51 am
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NFA palay procurement tops 5.4M bags in first half
July 11, 2019 | 9:47 pm
Description: https://www.bworldonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/NFA-rice-warehouse-071219.jpgPHILIPPINE STAR/MICHAELVARCAS
THE procurement of palay, or unmilled rice, amounted to more than 5.4 million bags in the first half, exceeding the target by 16%, the National Food Authority said in a statement, as the agency concluded its first half-year focused only on domestic rice procurement.
“With a very high rate of procurement during the previous months, we were able to raise the NFA’s total palay procurement for the first half of 2019 to 5.412 million bags. In total, our palay procurement is 16% higher than our 4.649 million target during the first six months this year,” NFA Administrator Judy Carol L. Dansal said in the statement Thursday.
The Rice Tariffication Law opened up rice imports to private firms, leaving the NFA to concentrate on procuring palay from domestic farmers to build its emergency reserves. It offers various incentives to make selling to the NFA attractive relative to prices offered by private rice traders.
Ms. Dansal also noted that the agency was able to front-load its procurement before the onset of the lean months. In June procurement totaled 626,100 bags, beating the target by 140%.
“It is very favorable because the agency is now preparing for the lean months, from July to early September, and for calamities that may hit the country during the rainy season. The rice import liberalization law still requires us to ensure at least 15-30 days of buffer stock and since the agency can no longer source its stock from imports, it is fortunate that our agency is performing well in procuring palay from our own farmers and that we were able to meet our mandated level of buffer stock,” she said.
The Rice Tariffication Act, or Republic Act 1120, opened up the import market to private entities while charging tariffs on their shipments. Imports used to be a key part of the NFA’s operations.



In October, the agency increased its buying price to P20.40 per kilogram (/kg) for individual farmers and P20.70/kg for members of farmer cooperatives or organizations, from P17.40/kg and P17.70/kg previously.
It has also added a P3.00/kg buffer stock incentive on top of the P0.20/kg drying, P0.20/kg delivery, and P0.30/kg Cooperative Development Incentive Fee.
Ms. Dansal said she has instructed NFA field offices to start milling palay in preparation for the lean months to ensure adequate supplies ready for release anytime.
“We have to efficiently manage our stocks, both to ensure our financial stability, and to see to it that by the time the main crop harvest starts in September until December, we will be ready again to serve our clients. We must be able to sustain our procurement operations with sufficient logistics, especially warehouse space to store the stock that we will be continuously procuring from our farmers,” she said.
She also noted that NFA rice is still being distributed at P27 per kilogram through accredited retailers. — Vincent Mariel P. Galang

Armenian government approves duty-free quotas for imported Vietnamese long-grain rice

Description: Armenian government approves duty-free quotas for imported Vietnamese long-grain rice
YEREVAN, June 12. /ARKA/. The Armenian government approved Thursday duty-free quotas for imported Vietnamese long-grain rice. Economy Minister Tigran Khachatryan said that the agreement on duty-free import of rice from Vietnam to the Eurasian Economic Union member countries has come into force on January 1, 2016. The agreement implies that the import of up to 10,000 tons of long-grain rice a year is free from customs duty.

In 2017, the rate was set at 6%, and in 2021 and 2022 it is expected to rise to 8 and 10 percent respectively.

“Before the end of 2018, Armenia enjoyed transitional preference, which implied no duty at all, while in 2019, a 3-percent rate will be applied, but not for preferential volumes,” Khachatryan said adding that the preferential 10,000 tons are distributed among the union countries.

In his words, Armenia applied for a preference quota of 150 tons, since the country imports 130 tons of long-grain rice in the total volume of 9,700 a year.

Khachatryan said 150 tons will be distributed among economic entities. In particular, 70% of the volume will be distributed among the economic entities which had been engaged in importing rice in the last three years, taking into account their shares at the market, and the remaining 25 % will be distributed among new applicant entities.

“If nobody applies before September 10, this will be offered to already operating entities,” the minister said. -0---
11:25 12.07.2019

Rice exports reach $2.07bn mark in FY19

·      RECORDER REPORT

·      JUL 12TH, 2019

·      KARACHI
Rice exports from Pakistan maintained upward momentum and touched all time high level of $2.07 billion mark in the last fiscal year (FY19). According to rice export statistics, in term of quantity, Pakistan exported total 4.097 million metric tons of rice during July-June of FY19 compared to some 4.082 million metric ton in corresponding period of FY18. During the last fiscal year, some 537,133 tons basmati rice and 3.545 million tons other varieties of rice were exported.

In term of value, Pakistan earned all time higher foreign exchange amounting to $ 2.074 billion in FY19 up from $ 2.035 billion, showing 2 percent growth.

Convener Rice Export Committee of Federation of Pakistan Chamber of Commerce and Industry (FPCCI) and former chairman Rice Exporters Association of Pakistan (REAP) has said that Pakistan's rice exports have posted growth in a difficult time, when the country's remaining major exports were on decline.

He said that there is need of development of new seed varieties to earn more foreign exchange, but unfortunately it requires regulatory framework. "Pakistan has exported over $ 2 billion worth rice in absence of Research and Development (R&D). We can export over $ 5 billion rice in next five years with some concrete efforts towards introduction of new rice seeds and varieties," he added.

Presently, Pakistani rice exporters are importing hybrid rice seeds from China on self-made basis to get better yield, however these hybrid seeds are not successful in long term, Rafique mentioned.

Regulatory framework should be devised for development of high yielding and commercially viable varieties and accordingly intern registering them for Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), he suggested.

China, Kenya and European Countries were leading importers of Pakistani rice. While, during the last fiscal year, exports to Indonesia also resumed and some 70,000 tons non-basmati rice was exported, he informed.

He said that Kenya is the largest buyer of Pakistani non basmati rice and approximately Pakistan has exported over 400,000 metric tons of rice during the last fiscal year. One of the largest buyer of Pakistani Basmati rice was Iran, but due to the non availability of banking channel, Pakistani rice exporters are unable to export rice to Iran, he mentioned.

Supply chain of rice should be regulated through centralized system to confront future challenges, he said added "sanitary & phytosanitary standards are also biggest challenge for Pakistani rice and there is need to devise a long term policy. In addition, grain standards like Thailand and India should be implemented at rice markets to ensure the quality of rice".

Rafique also urged for up-gradation of local mills, improved storage practices and better transportation channel from farms to markets to avoid breakages and insecticides. Presently, Pakistan is losing some 15 percent of rice grains/ crop due to bad handling and storages practices.

He said that Minister of Commerce Abdul Razak Dawood is fully supporting and assured full support for increase in rice exports. With present government's efforts, Qatar has recently lifted ban on export of rice from Pakistan and also placed a 5000 tons rice export order.

There is need to explore new market and renegotiate the Free Trade Agreements with Indonesia, China and EU to further enhance the rice exports.

He said that Pakistan's rice crop is also facing a challenge of higher cost of production against regional competitors, which are providing subsidies to farmers to produce high yield. Government should support the farmers for an improved crop, he demanded.

Rafique has said that the milestone of all time exports has been achieved by the consistent efforts and under the leadership of Safdar Mehkari Chairman REAP and former Chairman REAP Abdul Rahim Janoo as they worked hard to increase the Pakistan's rice export volume.

He also warned that uncertainty of exchange rates may hit the rice exports in future; therefore there is need to of sustainable exchange rate so exporters can finalized their deals with foreign buyers.

GOCC dividends reach record high in July —DOF

 July 11, 2019 7:54pm 
By JON VIKTOR D. CABUENAS, GMA News
Dividends remitted by government-owned and -controlled corporations (GOCCs) grew to a record high of P61.3 billion as of July this year, the Department of Finance (DOF) reported Thursday.
"The dividends collected by the national government help offset the subsidies given out to state enterprises performing crucial social functions," Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez III was quoted as saying in an e-mailed statement.
"They will go a long way in helping us hold down deficits and continue funding the infrastructure and social programs of President [Rodrigo] Duterte," he added.
The latest figure compares with the P51.2 billion recorded in 2018, which was 41% higher than the P36.5 billion collected in 2017.
According to Dominguez, the additional dividends will help finance the pensions of the country's uniformed personnel, as well as the funding for the Rice Competitiveness Enhancement Fund (RCEF).
The Department of Budget and Management (DBM) last year said it has already released P54.231 billion for the pension requirements of retired military and uniformed personnel (MUP).
Meanwhile, the RCEF is mandated by the Rice Tariffication Law, to provide support for local farmers who will be hit by the liberalization of the rice commodity.
The RCEF will have an initial P10 billion, of which P5 billion will be allotted to farm mechanization and P3 billion to seedlings.
The fund intends to ensure that rice imports won’t drown out the agriculture sector and rob farmers of their livelihood. — MDM, GMA News

UMD students track effects on wild rice

  • 4:51 pm
EEN
DULUTH, MN — Sunshine and studying don’t usually mix well, but it was the perfect pairing Thursday for UMD students out researching wild rice.The 10-week project is happening at UMD’s farm land off Jean Duluth Road.
There, students spent the day collecting soil samples alongside a UMD grad student.
The work will help find the effects of sulfur and sulfides on wild rice.
“This kind of work is very meaningful,” Arianna Northbird, a UMD student, said. “This is a community based project, so what we’re doing here is very beneficial for the tribe and the community around us.”
After their hands-on research, students will write a paper and make a poster. They’ll eventually present it to several agencies, including Fond du Lac tribal scientists.
Description: https://s3-ca-central-1.amazonaws.com/quincy-network/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2019/07/wild-rice-2.jpg


Wheat designed to use water more efficiently

 July 11, 2019 

Description: https://static.producer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/11121355/51_3-col_CM-wheat.jpg
Scientists find that wheat modified to have fewer spores uses water more efficiently. | Chris McCullough photo
British scientists develop a type of bread wheat that uses less water while maintaining photosynthesis and yield
A new wheat that can better survive drought conditions has been developed by scientists.
Researchers at the University of Sheffield’s Institute for Sustainable Food in the United Kingdom discovered that fewer microscopic pores called stomata on the leaves allowed plants to make better use of water.
The research was then used to develop a new drought-hardy bread wheat.
Compared to conventional wheat, the engineered wheat used less water while maintaining photosynthesis and yield.
Like most plants, wheat uses stomata to regulate its intake of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, as well as the release of water vapour. When water is plentiful, stomatal openings help plants to regulate temperature by evaporative cooling, which is similar to sweating.
In drought conditions, wheat plants normally close their stomata to slow down water loss, and wheat with fewer stomata has been found to better conserve water and can use that water to cool itself.
During the study, published in the Journal of Experimental Botany, scientists tested the new wheat in conditions similar to what might be expected under climate change prediction models, with higher levels of carbon dioxide and less water.
The researchers said agriculture accounts for about 85 percent of the world’s fresh-water use. On average, it takes more than 1,800 litres of water to produce one kilogram of wheat.
Yet as water supplies become scarce and variable in the face of climate change, farmers will need to produce more food with less water to feed a growing population.
The research builds on the Institute for Sustainable Food’s work to develop new rice types, which found that rice with fewer stomata used 40 percent less water than conventional breeds and were able to survive drought and temperatures of 40 C.
“Developing wheat that uses water more efficiently will help us to feed our growing population while using fewer natural resources making our food systems more resilient in the face of climate breakdown,” said Julie Gray, professor of plant molecular biology at the Institute for Sustainable Food.
In a separate study published in Plant, Cell and Environment, scientists at the institute also found that plants engineered to have fewer stomata are less susceptible to diseases.
They hope to be able to replicate those findings in crops such as wheat and rice.

Why Meru deputy governor consented to pay rice miller Sh130m

Nice Rice Millers sued county for impounding rice wagons and revoking their license.

In Summary
• The Meru county government and the miller's director Njiru Mkombozi signed the consent agreement before Meru presiding judge Alfred Mabeya.  
Description: https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ZyJ4ca5hnEU1qjvwzs4NMismxv8OItWVnK63w8_zqbRuWiirbG3c8Wd5DzAN2V-mK4Y-yZUnJtcpB2Ra-CUnx-StIozU8A=s750
Nice Rice Millers Director Njiru Mkombozi and his Lawyer Magee Wa Magee outside Meru High Court.
 GERALD MUTETHIA
A stern warning and impending jail time for contempt of court  prompted Meru deputy governor Titus Ntuchiu to consent to pay a businessman Sh130million.
Njiru Mkombozi, through his firm Nice Rice Millers Ltd, sued the devolved unit in 2015 and was awarded Sh138 million on May 2 after winning the case.
The county had impounded his rice wagons rendering many jobless, revoked his license amounting to Sh500,000 and destroyed some rice, Mkombozi said.
The Meru county government and the miller's director Njiru Mkombozi signed the consent agreement on Tuesday before Meru presiding judge Alfred Mabeya.  
The two are said to have held a lengthy discussion after the court issued a stern warning and final summonses for Ntuchiu and county secretary failure to which they would be in contempt. 
 A previous summons had been issued on June 27 by the same judge, but they explained to a satisfaction of court their reasons to skip proceedings.
Speaking to journalists at the court premises Ntuchiu said the agreement was painful because it would take away scarce resources from the county.
"Tha money would be enough to finance the construction of 20 boreholes or an annual development budget of Sh20 million for six wards,” Ntuchiu said. 
The deputy governor said he will legal advice on whether individuals should be held liable in such cases. 
“I will find out a constitutional interpretation on whether officials who commit such offences should be held personally in contempt. I wish if it was possible for the officials who caused this expense pays,” Ntuchui said.  
(edited by O. Owino)

Rice Packaging Business In Nigeria

 
Description: https://leadership.ng/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/rice-field.jpg
Rice is an important staple crop in Nigeria. It is relatively easy to produce and is grown for sale and home consumption. In some areas, there is a long tradition of rice growing, but for many rice has been considered a luxury food for special occasions only. With the increased availability of rice, it has become part of the everyday diet of many in Nigeria.
Nigerians spend not less than N1 billion daily on rice consumption, while spending has drastically reduced, consumption has increased because of increased local production of the commodity.
“The consumption rate now is 7.9 million tonnes and the production rate has increased to 5.8 tonn es per annum. ’’This is as a result of CBN’s Anchor Borrowers Programme (ABP) with a total of 12 million rice producers and 4 million hectares of FADAMA rice land. Since inception of the program, it has created economic linkage between Small Holder Farmers (SHF) and reputable large-scale processors, thereby, increasing agricultural outputs and significantly improving capacity utilisation of processors.
Rice Packaging And Branding Business
With the above, you will be sure of getting enough quantity of local rice to package and brand with your own name. The local rice is available in different states in Nigeria such as, Kano, Kaduna, Enugu, Gombe, Niger, Kebbi, Ebonyi, Anambra states etc. All you need to do is buy the 100kg bag of stone free quality local rice, then brand and bag into different kg such as 2kg, 5kg, 10kg, 25kg with your brand name and supply to shops. Branding in rice is key as your brand will sell your rice as long as it is good.
Things To Consider Before Going Into Rice Branding
Capital: The capital you need depends on the scale at which you want to operate such as small, medium or large scale, but any amount from N250,000 will go a long way.
Rice variety: You really need to investigate all kinds of rice varieties in Nigeria. At least the popular ones in your area or areas where they are cheap.
Market: Decide your market, better still, look for one. Your market is your business and not the product. Yes, the product is the value you offer for money, but the people in your market are the ones that will pay. No pay, no business.
Miller: This is where your work really starts. You need to go to the rural areas where there are local rice millers. Look for a miller with “near modern” equipment and excellent parboiling and drying techniques. Also look out for high level of hygiene.
Your brand and packaging: After all the work has been done. You must present yourself, your product with the right package to attract the buyers, including a good name that will sell.
Finally, the return on investment is sure as Nigerians are now aware of the nutritional value of local rice over the foreign one, which has little or no nutritional value. As far as you have a good rice to your brand name, you will sell and be patronised by Nigerians, the government and its agencies.

The U.S. Rice Industry:  Integrity, Quality, Commitment, and Innovation
By Jason Bond

Jason Bond is a weed scientist at Mississippi State University and a member of the 2019-21 Rice Leadership Class.  Following is his report on Session II of the two-year program.

STONEVILLE, MS - In the time since Session I, most areas have experienced extreme weather challenges that led to delays in planting and crop establishment.  When the workload is big and time is short, it is human nature to focus on a concentrated zone around your area of operation.  The growers in our group were able to share their experiences and challenges while those of us representing industry offered them encouraging words because we had observed similar difficulties among our different clientele, but over a wider geography.  Conversations like these help strengthen the bond among class members. 

Session I emphasized rice development, production, and movement along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas, and Session II broadened the focus with a trip to the Midwest for visits to the Chicago Board of Trade, John Deere Harvest Works, and rice farms in Arkansas and Mississippi.

Observing active trading and hearing about the history and operating procedures at the Chicago Board of Trade was intriguing as it is vital for rice trading.  However, in my small slice of the industry focused on rice production, I had never learned how trading works. 

Everyone involved in production agriculture that tours John Deere Harvest Works should depart impressed.  The scale of the operation was nearly overwhelming.  It was impressive to see one of these massive machines assembled from its basic components.  I also enjoyed discussing the future of Deere and Company's technology in combines and other implements. 



Media training 
Two details from the day in Moline made an impression on me.  First was the attitude of the employees with whom we interacted.  From managers to tour guides to plant workers, it was obvious that all were excited to be employed by Deere and Company.  As we toured the manufacturing plant, nearly every plant worker stopped to smile and wave at our group.  The second aspect of Deere and Company I found memorable was how prominently displayed their company values were and the candor with which the tour guide discussed them.  According to the guide, John Deere built his company based on integrity, quality, commitment, and innovation.  I have made efforts over the years to create a culture in my research/Extension program with defined goals and values.  Seeing a historical figure such as John Deere had some of the same ideas is inspirational as my career evolves.

When we arrived in Little Rock, we spent a day learning interview and public speaking skills that will be extremely useful in my profession.  Thursday morning we visited Chris and Mark Isbell's farm.  It's a unique operation with a long history, and I enjoyed hearing about the experimentation that has allowed it to evolve over the years. 

A tour of Five Oaks Duck Lodge in Stuttgart, Arkansas, afforded us the chance to see a display of wildlife conservation and how rice production can augment conservation efforts.  The owner, George Dunklin, shared his lodge with us for the Arkansas alumni dinner.  Meeting other graduates of the program reinforced the importance of developing relationships. 

Finally, stops at Producers Rice Mill and Riceland Foods, both in Stuttgart, and Farmers Grain Terminal in Greenville, Mississippi, provided more insight into post-harvest movement and preparation of rice for entering the different markets serviced by growers in the Midsouth.
Session II of the Rice Leadership Development Program was a valuable experience for me personally and professionally.  I again was amazed at the intricacies of the rice industry and the level of commitment by the individuals who contribute at all the different levels.

WASDE Report Released 
 
WASHINGTON, DC -- The outlook for 2019/20 U.S. rice is for increased supplies, higher domestic use and exports, and lower ending stocks.  All rice supplies are raised this month by 4.9 million cwt to 289.5 million.  All rice production increased by 10.6 million cwt to 208.7 million with long grain production raised 12.6 million cwt on a higher harvested area than previously estimated.  Combined medium and short grain production is lowered 2 million cwt on reduced harvested area.  Partly offsetting the production increase is a 5.7 million cwt decrease in beginning stocks.  The NASS Rice Stocks report implied significantly higher domestic and residual use than previously estimated for the 2018/19 marketing year, which resulted in lower 2019/20 beginning stocks. 
All rice exports for 2018/19 are also raised 2 million cwt (all long grain) to 92 million, the result of a strong recent export pace.  Total rice use for 2019/20 is increased 6 million cwt to 239 million on a 5 million cwt increase in domestic and residual use and a 1 million cwt increase in exports.  All rice ending stocks are lowered 1.1 million cwt to 50.5 million, and the season-average farm price for all rice is raised $0.10 per cwt to $11.80.

Global 2019/20 rice supplies are raised fractionally on both higher beginning stocks and production.  The higher 2019/20 beginning stocks stem from several 2018/19 changes including a 400,000 ton production decrease, a 900,000 ton consumption decrease, and a 200,000 ton increase in beginning stocks.  The small 2019/20 production increase is the result of a 300,000 ton increase in U.S. production that is partially offset by a 100,000 ton decrease for Brazil.  Global 2019/20 exports are lowered fractionally to 46.9 million tons.  With global supplies rising more than use, world ending stocks are increased 800,000 tons to a record 172.7 million.
Go here to read the complete report. 

Rice exporters call on Abdul Razak Dawood

Web Desk On Jul 11, 2019
Description: Abdul Razak Dawood
ISLAMABAD: A delegation of the Rice Exporters Association on Thursday called on Adviser to Prime Minister on Commerce, Textile, Industries and Production Abdul Razak Dawood.
The delegation thanked the adviser over taking steps for the removal of rice exports ban to Qatar.
Expressing his views on the occasion, Razak Dawood urged the Rice Exporters Association to benefit from the Qatar and Iran market.
He vowed to increase rice exports from $2billion to $5billion in upcoming five years.
Earlier, the Trade Development Authority of Pakistan (TDAP) had declared that Pakistan rice exports exceeded by $2 billion mark for the financial year ended 2017-18.
An increase of 29.15 per cent in rice exports was registered during 11 months of the 2017-18 fiscal year as about 3.842 million metric tons of rice worth $1.889 billion was reported to had been exported during this period.
During the period from July-May FY18, 461,472 metric tons of basmati rice worth $478.853 million was exported against the exports of 406,824 metric tons worth $385.746 in the same period last year.
In last 11 months of the financial year 2017-18, basmati rice exports grew by 24.14 per cent as compared the exports of the corresponding period of last year, the data further added.

Bureau of Plant Industry issues 1,518 rice import permits in 4 months

 -
Description: https://39byfk2z09ab1y1bzj1l5r82-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/top01-011018-696x464.jpgPrices of assorted varieties of rice are seen at the San Andres public market in Manila in this file photo.
THE government has issued a total of 1,518 import permits to traders that sought its permission to import rice following the effectivity of the rice trade liberalization law in March, data released by the Bureau of Plant Industry (BPI) showed.
Figures from the agency indicated that 190 cooperatives, traders and institutions applied for sanitary and phytosanitary import clearances (SPS-IC) from March 5 to June 30 for the purchase of 1.478 million metric tons (MMT) of imported rice.
The BPI was mandated to facilitate private-sector importation by issuing SPS-ICs once the rice trade liberalization law took effect on March 5.
Under the new trade regime, private entities must secure an SPS-IC from the BPI, an attached agency of the Department of Agriculture (DA), prior to bringing imported rice into the country.
Republic Act (RA) 11203 deregulated the National Food Authority (NFA), which used to issue import licenses to qualified traders.
The agency’s records indicated that among the applicants, Indian grocery store Assad Mini Mart accounted for the biggest volume at 59,500 metric tons.
Puregold Price Club Inc., the grocery-chain operator owned by businessman Lucio Co, was among the top 5 import applicants with a volume of 37,435 MT.
BPI data indicated that importers would buy rice from India, Pakistan, Thailand, Vietnam, Italy, Myanmar and Spain.
More than half of the rice importers are cooperatives, while about 65 applicants are companies and millers.

Arrivals

A total of 150 eligible importers used 755 SPS-ICs and brought in 707,909.503 MT of rice as of end-June. The imports were sourced from Myanmar, Pakistan, Thailand and Vietnam.
BPI’s end-June import arrival figures are less than half of the 1.43 MMT declared by the Bureau of Customs (BOC) under the new trade regime.
During the four-month period, Arvin International Marketing Inc. accounted for the bulk of arrivals at 25,268 MT. It used 29 out of its 57 SPS-ICs.
Under RA 11203, the BPI is mandated to act on every application within seven days. Failure to do so would mean automatic approval of the application.

Tariff collection doubted

The BOC earlier announced that it has collected P5.9 billion in tariffs from 1.43 MMT of imported rice that entered the country’s ports from March 5 to June 30.
However, the amount collected by the BOC is being disputed by some rice industry groups due to possible undervaluation by traders and importers.
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) said in a report that the country’s rice imports this year will rise by 20 percent to a record high of 3 MMT, making the Philippines one of the world’s top buyers of the staple.
The USDA said purchases of imported rice rose after the government removed the quantitative restriction on rice with the implementation of RA 11203.
Image Credits: Roy Domingo

Nagpur Foodgrain Prices Open- JULY 12, 2019
JULY 12, 2019 / 1:54 PM
* * * * * *
Nagpur Foodgrain Prices – APMC/Open Market-July 12, 2019 Nagpur, July 12 (Reuters) – Gram and tuar prices recovered in Nagpur Agriculture Produce and Marketing Committee (APMC) on increased demand from local millers amid weak supply from producing regions. Healthy rise on NCDEX in gram and repeated enquiries from South-based millers also helped to push up prices. About 650 bags of gram and 100 bags of tuar reported for auction, according to sources.

GRAM
* Gram varieties ruled steady in open market here on subdued demand from local

traders.

TUAR
* Tuar Karnataka reported down in open market here on lack of demand

from local traders.

* Mot prices reported higher in open market here on good demand from

local traders amid tight supply from producing belts.

* In Akola, Tuar New – 5,800-6,000, Tuar dal (clean) – 8,300-8,500, Udid Mogar (clean)

– 6,800-7,500, Moong Mogar (clean) 7,300-8,300, Gram – 4,400-4,500, Gram Super best

– 6,200-6,400 * Wheat, other varieties of rice and other foodgrain items moved in a narrow range in

scattered deals and settled at last levels in thin trading activity.

Nagpur foodgrains APMC auction/open-market prices in rupees for 100 kg

FOODGRAINS Available prices Previous close

Gram Auction 3,900-4,180 3,900-4,130

Gram Pink Auction n.a. 2,100-2,600

Tuar Auction 4,700-5,350 4,700-5,300

Moong Auction n.a. 3,950-4,200

Udid Auction n.a. 4,300-4,500

Masoor Auction n.a. 2,200-2,500

Wheat Lokwan Auction 1,850-1,995 1,900-2,000

Wheat Sharbati Auction n.a. 2,900-3,000

Gram Super Best Bold 6,200-6,500 6,200-6,500

Gram Super Best n.a. n.a.

Gram Medium Best 5,800-6,000 5,800-6,000

Gram Dal Medium n.a. n.a

Gram Mill Quality 4,400-4,500 4,400-4,500

Desi gram Raw 4,350-4,450 4,350-4,450

Gram Kabuli 8,300-10,000 8,300-10,000

Tuar Fataka Best-New 8,500-8,600 8,500-8,600

Tuar Fataka Medium-New 8,200-8,300 8,200-8,300

Tuar Dal Best Phod-New 7,700-8,000 7,700-8,000

Tuar Dal Medium phod-New 7,000-7,500 7,000-7,500

Tuar Gavarani New 5,750-5,950 5,750-5,950

Tuar Karnataka 6,150-6,350 6,200-6,400

Masoor dal best 5,400-5,500 5,400-5,500

Masoor dal medium 5,100-5,300 5,100-5,300

Masoor n.a. n.a.

Moong Mogar bold (New) 7,500-8,500 7,700-8,800

Moong Mogar Medium 5,500-6,500 5,800-6,500

Moong dal Chilka New 6,700-7,700 6,700-7,700

Moong Mill quality n.a. n.a.

Moong Chamki best 8,000-8,500 8,000-8,500

Udid Mogar best (100 INR/KG) (New) 7,000-7,800 7,000-7,800

Udid Mogar Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,500-6,500 5,500-6,500

Udid Dal Black (100 INR/KG) 4,000-4,400 4,000-4,400

Mot (100 INR/KG) 5,200-6,500 5,100-6,500

Lakhodi dal (100 INR/kg) 4,800-4,900 4,800-4,900

Watana Dal (100 INR/KG) 5,500-5,600 5,500-5,600

Watana Green Best (100 INR/KG) 6,800-7,000 6,800-7,000

Wheat 308 (100 INR/KG) 2,100-2,200 2,100-2,200

Wheat Mill quality (100 INR/KG) 2,000-2,100 2,000-2,100

Wheat Filter (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,600 2,500-2,600

Wheat Lokwan best (100 INR/KG) 2,400-2,600 2,400-2,600

Wheat Lokwan medium (100 INR/KG) 2,200-2,300 2,200-2,300

Lokwan Hath Binar (100 INR/KG) n.a. n.a.

MP Sharbati Best (100 INR/KG) 3,200-3,800 3,200-3,800

MP Sharbati Medium (100 INR/KG) 2,700-3,000 2,700-3,000

Rice Parmal (100 INR/KG) 2,100-2,200 2,100-2,200

Rice BPT best (100 INR/KG) 3,000-3,500 3,100-3,500

Rice BPT medium (100 INR/KG) 2,400-2,900 2,500-3,000

Rice Luchai (100 INR/KG) 2,900-3,000 2,900-3,000

Rice Swarna best (100 INR/KG) 2,500-2,700 2,500-2,700

Rice HMT best (100 INR/KG) 3,800-4,400 3,800-4,400

Rice HMT medium (100 INR/KG) 3,400-3,600 3,400-3,600

Rice Shriram best(100 INR/KG) 5,500-5,700 5,500-5,700

Rice Shriram med (100 INR/KG) 4,500-4,700 4,500-4,700

Rice Basmati best (100 INR/KG) 8,500-13,500 8,500-13,500

Rice Basmati Medium (100 INR/KG) 5,000-7,000 5,000-7,000

Rice Chinnor best 100 INR/KG) 6,500-7,200 6,500-7,200

Rice Chinnor medium (100 INR/KG) 6,200-6,400 6,200-6,400

Jowar Gavarani (100 INR/KG) 2,350-2,550 2,350-2,550

Jowar CH-5 (100 INR/KG) 2,050-2,250 2,050-2,250 WEATHER (NAGPUR) Maximum temp. 35.0 degree Celsius, minimum temp. 24.8 degree Celsius Rainfall : Nil FORECAST: Generally cloudy sky with light rains. Maximum and minimum temperature likely to be around 35 degree Celsius and 25 degree Celsius respectively. Note: n.a.—not available (For oils, transport costs are excluded from plant delivery prices, but included in market prices)

Rice exports to squeeze due to MSP, scanty rains

To supplement farm income, the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) increased paddy procurement price by 13 per cent in 2018 and this year.

By
, ET Bureau|
Jul 12, 2019, 06.59 PM IST
0Comments
BCCL
Description: rice_bcclNon-basmati rice export fell 15 per cent in the last financial year as procurement price spiked.
India, the world’s largest rice exporter, could see a decline in exports this year due to rise in minimum support price (MSP) of paddy and scanty rains in the current kharif season. Rice processing and exporters anticipate a drop from exports pegged at Rs 55,000 crore per year.

Rice exporters in India are expecting the slide in export of non-basmati to continue in the current year as they face trimming of margins after the latest hike in MSP by 3.7 percent for paddy announced by the federal government. Competitor countries including Thailand, Vietnam and Myanmar are likely to gain from India's current situation.

“Export of rice is sure to fall drastically as the government has not extended interest subvention on export of the commodity to compensate the rising cost of procurement,” BV Krishna Rao, president of the Rice Exporters Association, told ET. “The industry expected a booster for agricultural exports in the form of interest subvention in the union budget,”he said.

To supplement farm income, the National Democratic Alliance (NDA) increased paddy procurement price by 13 per cent in 2018 and the latest hike is for the current kharif season. “It will make rice exports from India dearer and squeeze margins to unmanageable levels for exporters,” Rao said.

Non-basmati rice export fell 15 per cent in the last financial year as procurement price spiked. The export stood at 4.8 million tonnes in 2018-19 compared to 6.3 million tonnes in 2017-18.

Rice processing and export industry is suspecting a steep fall in non-basmati exports in the current financial year. “Less rains will check yields and most of the output will go for government procurement. Private buying may remain subdued due to high procurement price,” a Chhattisgarh-based rice exporter said.

Rice exporters were given 5 per cent interest subvention under the Merchandise Exports from India Scheme (MEIS) as relief from higher domestic prices of the commodity earlier.

Despite an upswing in volumes and value of premium rice last year, exporters of basmati rice are also anxious. Exporters maintain that in the last season the loss of margins were compensated despite the increase in MSP due to the depreciation of the rupee against the US dollar. But the situation has turned unfavorable after the US hurdles in import of crude oil from Iran that is set to affect the rice trade.

Last season, Iran imported almost one-third of India’s total output.

“In the last year, rice industry had paid premium to farmers above the market price of paddy to discourage the use of pesticides and chemicals. The industry has also heavily invested in educating farmers on propagating best farming practices with little financial aid from Agricultural & Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) or other financial institutions,” said Ashok Sethi, Punjab Rice Millers and Exporters Association. He lamented that the rice processing industry was up against serious hurdles in global market due to tough minimum residue levels of pesticides and chemicals.

Rice Prices

as on : 12-07-2019 01:33:27 PM

Arrivals in tonnes;prices in Rs/quintal in domestic market.
Arrivals
Price
Current
%
change
Season
cumulative
Modal
Prev.
Modal
Prev.Yr
%change
Rice
Gadarpur(Utr)
1375.00
-35.78
39014.00
2540
1432
-
Sultanpur(UP)
280.00
-20
3263.00
2750
2735
-
Siliguri(WB)
172.00
-1.71
3634.00
3800
3800
-
Gondal(UP)
149.00
-5.7
5521.00
2450
2450
12.64
Dhing(ASM)
135.00
8
1420.00
2650
2650
3.92
Ballia(UP)
110.00
-8.33
1415.00
2400
2380
5.73
Karvi(UP)
105.00
950
261.50
2375
2360
6.98
Bindki(UP)
100.00
-16.67
3130.00
2260
2380
-
Puranpur(UP)
90.00
60.71
5931.00
2460
2455
3.36
Bareilly(UP)
84.00
200
1260.50
2475
2460
2.27
Aligarh(UP)
80.00
6.67
2665.00
2540
2550
NC
Srirampur(ASM)
70.00
75
110.00
2300
2350
-8.00
Barhaj(UP)
60.00
-14.29
5678.00
2390
2390
10.65
Asansol(WB)
55.00
-9.84
2304.50
2840
2830
-8.39
Durgapur(WB)
55.00
-8.33
1181.00
2630
2630
-6.90
Kopaganj(UP)
51.00
18.6
582.00
2445
2460
13.46
Gauripur(ASM)
50.00
NC
1120.50
4500
4500
NC
Indus(Bankura Sadar)(WB)
45.00
12.5
2242.00
2750
2700
NC
Bazpur(Utr)
41.10
-59.06
3567.70
2200
2250
-12.87
Cachar(ASM)
40.00
100
2961.00
2400
2400
NC
Karimganj(ASM)
40.00
NC
180.00
2450
2450
-
Muzzafarnagar(UP)
37.00
-9.76
606.00
2950
2945
-
Lakhimpur(UP)
34.00
13.33
1391.50
2330
2340
0.87
Kandi(WB)
31.00
14.81
476.00
2550
2550
-5.56
Howly(ASM)
30.00
200
422.00
2530
2800
12.44
Hapur(UP)
30.00
-40
1620.00
2980
2890
11.19
Naugarh(UP)
27.50
-12.7
2070.50
2425
2415
18.29
Kayamganj(UP)
25.00
25
816.00
2640
2650
15.79
Dadri(UP)
25.00
25
608.00
2940
2940
10.11
Madhoganj(UP)
21.50
-14
3136.50
2280
2300
1.33
Etawah(UP)
21.00
-16
1685.50
2650
2630
10.65
Sitapur(UP)
21.00
-4.55
428.00
2325
2330
-
Allahabad(UP)
20.00
NC
997.50
2450
2450
-5.41
Lalitpur(UP)
20.00
-33.33
1421.00
2820
2810
-
Bankura Sadar(WB)
20.00
11.11
58.00
2400
2400
-7.69
Karsiyang(Matigara)(WB)
19.10
-0.52
588.70
3400
3600
13.33
Basti(UP)
18.00
-10
1186.00
2420
2420
14.15
Rampur(UP)
18.00
20
520.50
2550
2600
6.92
Saharanpur(UP)
16.00
60
874.50
2910
2910
8.99
Bharthna(UP)
15.00
-25
5673.00
2630
2625
8.68
Farukhabad(UP)
14.50
-14.71
525.50
2700
2680
11.57
Jasra(UP)
11.00
83.33
353.00
2500
2500
-
Jayas(UP)
11.00
10
854.70
2020
2030
-3.81
Alappuzha(Ker)
10.00
NC
80.00
6850
6850
NC
Vilthararoad(UP)
10.00
NC
671.00
2100
2150
0.48
Paliakala(UP)
10.00
-9.09
513.30
2310
2300
0.87
Kaliaganj(WB)
10.00
-
10.00
3500
-
-
Fatehpur(UP)
9.00
100
870.60
2340
2325
4.70
Chitwadagaon(UP)
9.00
NC
91.00
2100
2100
-
Kannauj(UP)
9.00
-5.26
204.30
2650
2600
7.72
Banda(UP)
8.00
-20
142.00
2360
2315
-
Nalbari(ASM)
7.80
6.85
162.20
2550
2550
2.00
Badayoun(UP)
6.00
-33.33
457.50
2500
2500
3.31
Bangarmau(UP)
6.00
50
95.20
2300
2300
6.98
Tundla(UP)
6.00
-7.69
220.60
2580
2580
-2.64
Soharatgarh(UP)
5.50
-8.33
407.00
2410
2410
16.43
Etah(UP)
5.00
-16.67
188.00
2560
2550
-
Kasganj(UP)
4.00
-50
103.50
2550
2560
-9.25
Khair(UP)
4.00
-33.33
31.20
2600
2600
1.96
Kalyani(WB)
3.50
-65
209.00
3400
3400
NC
Mangaon(Mah)
3.00
NC
31.00
3800
2800
35.71
Sehjanwa(UP)
3.00
-25
231.60
2160
2160
NC
Badda(UP)
3.00
-14.29
98.70
2300
2250
-
Chandoli(UP)
2.80
-20
344.70
2330
2325
3.10
Ahirora(UP)
2.00
-33.33
284.90
2300
2300
-
Garbeta(Medinipur)(WB)
2.00
NC
32.00
3800
3900
35.71
Gadaura(UP)
1.80
-99.41
361.40
2400
2400
26.32
Anandnagar(UP)
1.50
50
204.90
2250
2270
-
Bharuasumerpur(UP)
1.20
-40
12.20
1950
1950
-2.50
Fatehpur Sikri(UP)
1.20
-7.69
24.80
2570
2560
NC
Jambusar(Kaavi)(Guj)
1.00
NC
50.00
3100
3000
-
Penugonda(Mah)
1.00
NC
23.00
4090
4090
0.25
Alibagh(Mah)
1.00
NC
78.00
2200
2200
-56.00
Murud(Mah)
1.00
NC
79.00
2200
2200
-45.00
Melaghar(Tri)
1.00
-33.33
18.50
2700
2700
-5.26
Nautnava(UP)
1.00
NC
247.60
2200
2260
-
Bishenpur(Man)
1.00
NC
4.10
4400
4400
-
Achnera(UP)
0.80
14.29
32.40
2610
2580
3.57
Lamlong Bazaar(Man)
0.80
-20
6.30
4600
4600
-
Published on July 12, 2019

Rice trading center in Shwebo to go public
KHIN SU WAI 11 JUL 2019
Description: Farmers at work in the paddy fields. Photo - EPA
Farmers at work in the paddy fields. Photo - EPA
After opening its fifth outlet in Sagaing Region, Shwebo Rice Trading Center is planning to change its corporate status to public to be on par with other trading centers in Myanmar, U Phyo Thura, vice president of the company, told The Myanmar Times on July 10.
This will help elevate the center’s presence in the international market and make it easier to conduct export activities, he said.
Public companies are required to obtain permission from both the Directorate of Investment and Company Administration and the Securities Exchange Commission of Myanmar before they are officially allowed to sell their shares over the counter.
Unlike a private company, which has a shareholder limitation of not more than 50, there is no shareholder limit for public companies.
Currently, 70pc of rice from Shwebo, Sagaing, is exported to China via the border however there are strict quotas in place to limit illegal trade. To export via the maritime route, Shwebo is trying to conform to the rice import regulations set by China, he said.
“We plan to establish a public firm by next year and ensure all our rice mills are in line with regulations by the rice trading season next year,” U Phyo Thura said.
Shwebo land is suitable for irrigated paddy, the cultivation rate of which has increased after Thaphanseik Dam was built in 2003. There are about a million paddy fields in Shwebo, which is among the main producers of high-grade Paw San paddy in Myanmar. There are about 300,000 acres worth of paddy fields in Shwebo that harvest only the Paw San variety.Myanmar exported more than 1.7million tonnes of rice and broken rice worth US$ 531.7million from October1, 2018 to June28, 2019 to Belgium, Indonesia, China and the Netherlands. 
In comparison, the country exported 3.6million tonnes of rice in 2016-17. – Translated

Strong currency props up Indian rice rates, wider demand subdued
Eileen Soreng
JULY 11, 2019/ 5:53 PM /
BENGALURU (Reuters) - Rice export prices in India extended gains this week helped by a stronger rupee, while expectations of fresh supplies entering the market weighed on Thai rates along with muted demand across major paddy-growing countries.

Farmers plant saplings in a rice field on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India, July 5, 2019. REUTERS/Amit Dave
Thailand’s benchmark 5-percent broken rice prices were quoted at $390-$404 a tonne on Thursday, free on board Bangkok (FOB), down from $395-$413 last week.

“The new crop is expected to start entering the market next month and this has driven the price down a little but the strong baht also means that the export price remains strong overall,” a Bangkok-based rice trader said.

Demand for Thai rice has remained flat as the local currency strengthened, traders added.

Thailand’s rice exports fell by 12% in the first half of 2019, hurt by the stronger baht, and will likely fall short of this year’s target of 9.5 million tonnes, an exporter group said on Wednesday.

Thailand shipped 4.2 million tonnes of rice between January and June with orders in the last two months falling to as low as 600,000 tonnes per month, according to the Thai Rice Exporters Association.

For top rice exporter India, prices of the 5 percent broken parboiled variety were quoted around $374-$377 per tonne this week, up from last week’s $371-$374.

The Indian rupee on Thursday rose to its highest level in 11-months, trimming exporters returns from overseas sales.

“For white rice demand is negligible. There’s modest demand for parboiled from African buyers,” said B V Krishna Rao, president of the Rice Exporters Association (REA).

The Indian government has also raised the price at which it will buy new-season common rice varieties from local farmers by 3.7 percent.

Meanwhile, neighbouring Bangladesh will procure 400,000 tonnes of paddy at 26,000 taka or $307.73 a tonne during the current harvesting season to support local farmers reeling under declining domestic prices, food minister Sadhan Chandra Majumdar said.

Market insiders, however, said the move would not benefit most growers in dire need of cash, since they were compelled to sell their crop at much cheaper rates to millers or middlemen.

Bangladesh has also been unable to clinch deals since its ban on rice exports was lifted in May.

In Vietnam, rates for 5% broken rice rose to $335-$340 a tonne from $330-$335 last week, as traders looked to increase profits, merchants said.

“Demand for 5% broken rice has been lacklustre this week,” a trader based in Ho Chi Minh City said. “We have received orders for fragrant rice only.”

Preliminary data showed nearly 60,000 tonnes of rice is to be loaded at Ho Chi Minh City ports during the July 1-16 period, compared with 311,700 tonnes in June, another trader said.

Most of the new shipments were headed to Iraq, Malaysia and West Africa, the trader added.

($1=84.49 taka)

Reporting by Panu Wongcha-um in Bangkok, Khanh Vu in Hanoi, Rajendra Jadhav in Mumbai, Ruma Paul in Dhaka; Editing by Kirsten Donovan

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

RPT-UPDATE 1-India receives above normal rains this week, spurring crop planting
Rajendra Jadhav
JULY 11, 2019
(Repeats Wednesday’s story with no changes to the text)

* India receives 28% above average rainfall this week

* Cotton, soybean-growing central India gets higher rainfall

* Rice-growing southern states receive below-average rains

By Rajendra Jadhav

MUMBAI, July 10 (Reuters) - India’s monsoon rains in the week ending on Wednesday were above average for the first time since the start of the season on June 1, helping farmers to accelerate the planting of summer-sown crops and easing concerns of drought.

Monsoon rains are crucial for farm output and economic growth, as about 55% of India’s arable land is rain-fed, and agriculture forms about 15% of a $2.5-trillion economy that is the third biggest in Asia.

India received 28% more rainfall than the 50-year average in the week to July 10, data from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) showed.

Soybean- and cotton-growing central India received 38% more rainfall in the week, while the rice-growing southern region got 20% less.

This week’s heavier monsoon cut the rainfall deficit since the start of the season to 14% from 28% last week.

India is still recovering from a drought last year that ravaged crops, killed livestock, emptied reservoirs and drained water supplies to city dwellers and some industries.

Some municipalities like Chennai, Mumbai and Hyderabad were forced to cut water supplies to ensure stocks lasted until monsoon rains replenished reservoirs.

This year rains arrived in the southern state of Kerala a week late on June 8. The developing Cyclone Vayu in the Arabian Sea drew moisture from the monsoon and weakened its progress.

The weak start to the monsoon has delayed planting, with farmers sowing crops on 23.4 million hectares as of July 5, down 27% from a year earlier.

“The monsoon revived at a crucial time. Sowing will accelerate in the coming days across the country,” said Vandana Bharti, assistant vice president at SMC Comtrade Ltd.

In late May the IMD forecast average rainfall in 2019, while the country’s only private forecaster, Skymet, has predicted below-normal rainfall.

A normal, or average, monsoon means rainfall between 96% and 104% of a 50-year average of 89 cm (35 inches) during the four-month monsoon season, according to the IMD’s classification.

“Crops need average or above average rainfall in the next few weeks. That will help in offsetting the impact of poor rainfall in June,” said Bharti.

India’s economy, which grew at its slowest in more than four years over the January-March quarter, is in no condition to take a hit from a poor monsoon, which determines rural demand for goods and services. https://www.reuters.com/article/india-monsoon/rpt-update-1-india-receives-above-normal-rains-this-week-spurring-crop-planting-idUSL4N24B36N

Rice tariff law wreaking havoc on farmers

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:00 AM July 11, 2019
Mr. Ernesto OrdoƱez’s article, “Rice farmers in grave danger,” (Agriwatch, 6/26/19) hit the nail right on the head.  My visit to Central Luzon confirmed it.
With the rice tariffication law, which has seen the abdication by  government officials of the governance of the rice industry in favor of profit-motive private traders, there has been a drastic lowering of palay prices. The steep drop in palay prices is a prelude to the eventual demise of the rice farming industry, a direct result of the P19-billion loss in its annual revenue, based on a P1 drop in the price of palay on  19 million metric tons of annual palay production. A low estimate of a P6 average drop in palay price alone means P114 billion in annual losses to farmers.
The P10-billion annual rice fund set aside for assistance to farmers  under the new law will not reach many of them in far-flung areas. Besides, it is a drop in the bucket compared to their needs and staggering loss in revenue.
What they need most is the National Food Authority’s (NFA) help in stabilizing palay prices through its palay procurement program from farmers at P17 to P18 per kilo.
But this help has been taken away from them under the new law. The NFA now buys mainly from traders the traditionally required minimum inventory and no more. With the loss of the NFA as the farmers’ alternative palay market, they have no choice but to sell to traders, who now buy from them at rock-bottom prices.
The traders buy the farmers’ palay produce at P9 to P12 per kilo, quickly turn around and sell the same to the NFA at P17 to P18 per kilo, then laugh all the way to the bank.
Without any government intervention in the rice industry, and with the NFA no longer able to protect farmers, private rice traders are now free to underprice farmers and overprice consumers. They can do this with immorally low prices for palay and unconscionably high prices for rice— b    ecause the free market has no moral dimension. Whatever the market will pay is valid in the free market.

'Difficult policy choices lie ahead' to improve Rohingya nutrition, research finds

By Teresa Welsh // 11 July 2019
Description: https://res.cloudinary.com/devex/image/fetch/c_scale,f_auto,q_auto,w_720/https:/lh5.googleusercontent.com/I_7xRwaZRD5cgxXJ1IYsjfpAgmXyr3cWAq9ndvXxxxEXkz6Ksqonf5jrlNDX7U3iAWoJxF3bjWua3qVK_iiFTel_DcVjn4XqOSN6FGsA5Z_tR2FoOynMXDP6TK8yBoBwKJXop8UzRohingya refugees line up at a store to buy food using an e-voucher system implemented by WFP. Photo by: European Union / CC BY-NC-ND
WASHINGTON — A monotonous diet of rice and pulses threatens nutrition improvement among Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. A long-term strategy is needed if the displaced population is to move out of survival mode, according to new research from the International Food Policy Research Institute.
The survey research, published in a policy brief, shows that among a population in Cox’s Bazar overwhelmingly dependent on food aid from the World Food Programme, the child stunting rate is now 32%.

A Better Understanding Of Wild Rice

Four students from around the country are collecting samples to see all the reactions sediments have on wild rice
July 11, 2019 
DULUTH, Minn.- Four students from around the country were at UMD pulling out water samplers to understand the sediment chemistry that wild rice grows in.
Two weeks ago, the students put those samplers into a large tub of water in hopes to find out all the different reactions the sediment has on the growth of wild rice.
The head of this research, says having students from around the country offers different viewpoints on how they would like to conduct the research.
“They have ideas that I haven’t necessarily thought of before, and I think that makes for a really collaborative learning environment”, said Sophie Lafond-Hudson, a UMD Grad Student.
One student in particular attending Oklahoma State says he never thought he would be able to do something like this.
“I am still just absolutely ecstatic about it, and honestly I don’t believe it. I told them when I got here it had to had been a clerical mistake. There is no way I got this job, but I did and they chose me and I consider myself very lucky”, said Gage Clark, Junior at Oklahoma State.
Students will take research from today to the labs of UMD and hope to have a better understanding of the sediments wild rice grows in.



Bruce Schultz, LSU AgCenter
Dr. Don Groth, shown presenting his latest research at the110th Annual Rice Field Day held at the H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station in Crowley, La., is the first recipient of an endowed chair to fund ongoing research at the rice station.

Groth named to rice research chair

$500,000 earmarked for rice research in Louisiana.
Brad Robb | Jul 11, 2019
Don Groth, Ph.D., plant pathologist and resident research coordinator of the H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station, is the first recipient of an endowed chair to enhance research efforts at the rice station
through a $500,000 investment from the Louisiana Rice Research Board.
Those funds bring the total funding set aside by the Colombian Free Trade Agreement, which must be designated for rice research in Louisiana, to $1.5 million. “Research funding on all levels is decreasing across agriculture,” says Groth. “Funds for the chair will provide a significant boost to research at the rice station.”
Interest generated by the account will be used to fund the endowed chair. “It took years of hard work by a lot of dedicated people to get this chair established,” says Groth.
Groth earned a Ph.D., in plant pathology from Iowa State University in 1983, and specializes in rice disease research and was named Conservation Systems Rice Researcher of the Year at the 2017 National Conservation Systems Cotton and Rice Conference