Saturday, February 06, 2016

5th February 2016 daily exclusive oryza rice e newsletter by riceplus magazine



Eating Fortified Rice May Increase Risk of Hookworm Infections, Finds Study

Feb 04, 2016

A team of researchers from the Cambodia-based French Research Institute for Development have found that eating fortified rice can increase the risk of hookworm infections, according to a study published in PLOS One in January 2016.
A study in Cambodian school children showed that rice's added micro-nutrients inadvertently help parasites grow. The researchers analyzed faecal samples of about 2,000 children at 16 primary schools. The schools were randomly split into four groups: children in one group received plain rice while the other groups received fortified with micro-nutrients such as iron, zinc, folate and different vitamins.
They measured levels of intestinal infections in the four groups after three and seven months and found that groups that consumed micro-nutrient fortified rice contracted with hookworm infections. They view that "the merits of micro-nutrient repletion should be weighed carefully against its possible risks.”
One of the authors of the paper/study says: “There is absolutely an important role to play for fortified rice, but it should be tailor-made to the local situation.” But, he noted that deworming every six months would help reduce hookworm infections likely to surface with fortified rice.
However, the study received mixed reactions. A nutrition researcher at Mahidol University in Thailand says the study's findings needed to be verifies because parasite infections are more or less common in some seasons. So, conducting the study in a season, when gut infections are common, may provide misleading results

FAO Forecasts 2015-16 Global Rice Production at 491.8 Million Tons; Slightly Down from Previous Year

Feb 04, 2016
In its January 2016 Cereal Supply and Demand Brief, the UN's Food and Agricultural Organization forecasts 2015-16 global rice production at around 491.8 million tons, slightly down from an estimated 494.3 million tons in 2014-15, and slightly up from its last month's forecast of around 491.4 million tons. The FAO forecasts improved production outlook in China, Vietnam and the U.S., while lower production prospects in Japan and Nepal.
In general, the FAO expects rice production along and south of the Equator to be dim, with insufficient water insufficient water lowering plantings in Australia and delaying them in Indonesia, while excessive rains and low returns are negatively affecting sowings in South America.
The FAO estimates 2015-16 global rice utilization at around 498.4 million tons, up about 1.1% from an estimated 492.8 million tons in 2014-15. The FAO anticipates the average per capita rice consumption in 2015-16 at around 54.7 kilograms.
The FAO estimates 2016 global rice stocks at around 166.6 million tons, down about 3% from an estimated 172.1 million tons in 2015, and up from its last month's forecast of around 165.6 million tons. The FAO expects the world stocks-to-use ratio down to a four-year low of 32.8%.
The FAO estimates 2016 global rice trade at around 45.4 million tons, up about 1.4% from an estimated 44.8 million tons last year, and slightly up from its last month's forecast of around 45 million tons. The FAO expects greater purchases by China and Indonesia in 2016.

FAO Global Rice Price Index Declines Slightly in January 2016 After Increasing in Previous Month

Feb 04, 2016
The FAO All Rice Price Index declined by two points or 0.5% to around 195 points in January 2016 after increasing slightly in December 2016. Before that, the index declined continuously for fifteen months since September 2014.
According to the FAO, prices of the Lower quality sub-index India remained stable at 181 points, while those of the Higher Quality Indica sub-index declined by about 1 point to 179 points. Japonica and Aromatic sub-indices declined by 1% and 2% respectively to 240 points and 149 points.
In January 2015 - January 2016, the FAO All Rice Price Index averaged 195 points, down about 12% from around 222 points during the same period last year. Sub-index for higher quality Indica rice prices declined about 7.5% y/y and sub-index for lower quality Indica rice prices declined about 4.4% y/y. Aromatic rice price sub-index declined about 21.4% y/y, and the sub-index for Japonica rice prices declined by about 14% y/y.
According to the FAO, Thai rice prices firmed due to lower supplies and a likely lower output this year. Pakistan rice prices increased on improved expectations for sales to China, the Near East and Africa. India rice prices declined due to a weaker rupee. Prices in Vietnam also declined ahead of the imminent harvest of the winter/spring crop. Prices in the U.S. declined on limited buying, and declined in Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil by a depreciation of local currencies.
During January 2015, average rice export quotations (on fob basis) of Thai 100% broken rice, Thai 5% rice, Thai 25% rice, Thai parboiled rice and Thai Fragrant rice increased to around $375 per ton, $369 per ton, $361 per ton, $377 per ton and $783 per ton respectively. Average export prices of Thai A1 Super rice declined to around $331 per ton.
Export prices of Vietnam 25% broken rice declined to around $340 per ton. Quotations of India 25% broken rice declined to around $321 per ton and those of and Pakistan 25% broken rice increased to around $303 per ton. While U.S. 4% broken rice variety declined to around $474 per ton, U.S. California 4% rice declined to around $775 per ton. Uruguay 5% rice remained declined to around $479 per ton.

EU Rice Imports Increase Sharply in September 1, 2015 - January 26, 2016

Feb 04, 2016
According to the latest data issued by the European Union (EU), rice imports by the EU increased sharply since the beginning of the crop year 2015-16 (September 1, 2015 - August 31, 2016).
The EU imported about 477,018 tons of rice during the period September 1, 2015 - January 26, 2016, up about 30% from around 366,417 tons imported during the same period last year.
Japonica rice imports increased about 10% to around 34,444 tons in September 1, 2015 - January 26, 2015 period from around 31,336 tons during the same period last year. Indica rice imports increased about 32% to around 442,575 tons during the said period from around 335,081 tons last year.
The UK remained the largest importer in September 1, 2015 - January 26, 2016 period with around 115,066 tons followed by France (83,779 tons), The Netherlands (52,544 tons), Germany (36,013 tons), Poland (34,932 tons) and Italy (32,782 tons). Other EU countries imported 121,902 tons.
During the week ended January 26, 2016, the EU imported around 26,035 tons of rice, up about 19% from around 21,941 tons imported during the week ended January 19, 2015.
The EU imported around 1.143 million tons of rice in the crop year 2014-15, up about 12.7% from around 1.013 million tons imported in the crop year 2013-14


Indonesian Agriculture Minister Rules Out Rice Imports in 2016 Due to Adequate Stocks

Feb 04, 2016

The Indonesian Agriculture Minister has ruled out rice imports in 2016 citing the Agriculture Ministry's reports that the current national stock of around 1.2 million tons was sufficient, according to Antara News Agency.
He noted that another 3.5 million tons of rice would be added to stocks following the February 2016 harvest.
Speaking during a grand rice harvest in East Java, he highlighted the need for increasing production as Indonesia will not import rice. "We hope our rice production would increase this year and will be higher than that of last year," he said.
"We will also do our best to keep the price of rice stable at the farmers' level during the harvest seasons. To this end, the government is cooperating with the State Logistics Board (Bulog) to purchase the farmers' rice," the minister was quoted.
He also noted that the current government purchase price of paddy at Rp 3,700 per kilogram (around $273 per ton) and rice at Rp 7,300 per kilogram (around $538 per ton) were lower than the market prices. Therefore, farmers are not selling their output to Bulog, he said.
Meanwhile, the current news may not be a good one for traders (in exporting nations) who were hopeful that a new demand from Indonesia would increase rice prices.

Global Rice Quotes
February 5th, 2016
Long grain white rice - high quality
Thailand 100% B grade   380-390                ↔
Vietnam 5% broken        350-360                ↔
India 5% broken               360-370                ↔
Pakistan 5% broken        345-355                ↔
Myanmar 5% broken      415-425                ↔
Cambodia 5% broken     425-435                ↔
U.S. 4% broken                 460-470                ↔
Uruguay 5% broken        440-450                ↔
Argentina 5% broken     430-440                ↔
Long grain white rice - low quality
Thailand 25% broken      350-360                ↔
Vietnam 25% broken      340-350                ↔
Pakistan 25% broken      310-320                ↔
Cambodia 25% broken   405-415                ↔
India 25% broken             325-335                ↔
U.S. 15% broken               440-450                ↔
Long grain parboiled rice
Thailand parboiled 100% stxd     370-380                ↔
Pakistan parboiled 5% broken stxd          NQ         ↔
India parboiled 5% broken stxd                 350-360                ↔
U.S. parboiled 4% broken             480-490                ↔
Brazil parboiled 5% broken          520-530                ↔
Uruguay parboiled 5% broken    NQ         ↔
Long grain fragrant rice
Thailand Hommali 92%   690-700                ↔
Vietnam Jasmine             425-435                ↔
India basmati 2% broken              NQ         ↔
Pakistan basmati 2% broken       NQ         ↔
Cambodia Phka Mails     750-760                ↔
Brokens
Thailand A1 Super            325-335                ↑
Vietnam 100% broken   320-330                ↔
Pakistan 100% broken stxd          285-295                ↔
Cambodia A1 Super        345-355                ↔
India 100% broken stxd                 260-270                ↔
Egypt medium grain brokens      NQ         ↔
U.S. pet food     280-290                ↔
Brazil half grain NQ         ↔


All prices USD per ton, FOB vessel, oryza.com


India Rice Sellers Increase Some of Their Quotes Today; Other Asia Rice Quotes Unchanged

Feb 04, 2016

India rice sellers increased their quotes for 5% broken rice and parboiled rice by about $5 per ton each to around $360-$370 per ton and $350-$360 per ton respectively. Other Asia rice sellers kept their quotes mostly unchanged today.                                
5% Broken Rice
Thailand 5% rice is indicated at around $365 - $375 per ton, about $15 per ton premium on Vietnam 5% rice shown at around $350 - $360 per ton. India 5% rice is indicated at around $360 - $370 per ton, about $15 per ton premium on Pakistan 5% rice shown at around $345 - $355 per ton.
25% Broken Rice
Thailand 25% rice is indicated at around $350 - $360 per ton, about $10 per ton premium on Vietnam 25% rice shown at around $340 - $350 per ton. India 25% rice is indicated at around $325 - $335 per ton, about $15 per ton premium on Pakistan 25% rice shown at around $310 - $320 per ton.
Parboiled Rice           
Thailand parboiled rice is indicated at around $370 - $380 per ton. India parboiled rice is indicated at around $350 - $360 per ton, about $55 per ton discount to Pakistan parboiled rice last shown at around $405 - $415 per ton.
100% Broken Rice
Thailand broken rice, A1 Super is indicated at around $320 - $330 per ton, on par with Vietnam 100% broken rice shown at around $320 - $330 per ton. India's 100% broken rice is shown at around $260 - $270 per ton, about $25 per ton discount to Pakistan broken sortexed rice shown at around $285 - $295 per ton



USDA Post Estimates South Africa MY 2015-16 Rice Consumption and Imports to Increase on Higher Corn, Wheat Prices

Feb 04, 2016
The USDA Post estimates South Africa's MY 2015-16 rice consumption to increase about 10% to around 970,000 tons from around 880,000 tons in MY 2014-15 due to drought reflected record corn and wheat prices. Consequently, the Post estimates South Africa's rice imports to increase about 10% to around 1.1 million tons from around 981,594 tons in MY 2014-15. India and Thailand, supply more than 92% of South Africa's rice demand.
South Africa imported 622,893 tons of rice in May 1, 2015 to November, 2015.
The country exports a small amount of rice to neighboring countries. The Post estimates South Africa to export around 120,000 tons of rice in MY 2015-16, almost same as last year's level of around 122,262 tons.
South Africa produces no rice due to water scarcity, and is totally dependent on imports to meet local demand. Rice imports in the country are duty-free.
South Africa is majorly produces wheat and corn. However, since the country is undergoing worst drought conditions, the Post is expecting production of wheat and corn to decline about 14% and 25% respectively in MY 2015-16.
The Post reports that yellow and white corn prices have increased about 96% y/y and 163% y/y respectively reflecting the impact of the drought on local corn supplies and the sharp depreciation in rand, which depreciated by about 25% in 2015 and by another 6% in January 2016. In the last three months, white corn and yellow corn prices increased, respectively, by 69% and 38%, according to the Post. Similarly, the Post reports that local wheat prices increased by 26% y/y and by 16% in the last three months.

Oryza CBOT Recap – Chicago Rough Rice Futures Trade Lower as Export Sales Report Fails to Spark Buying Interest

Feb 05, 2016

Chicago rough rice futures for Mar delivery settled 8.5 cents per cwt (about $2 per ton) lower at $11.150 per cwt (about $244 per ton). The other grains finished the day lower; Soybeans closed about 0.3% lower at $8.7450 per bushel; wheat finished about 1.5% lower at $4.7275 per bushel, and corn finished the day about 0.7% lower at $3.6850 per bushel.
U.S. stocks traded in a moderate range Thursday, as investors digested weaker-than-expected economic data while keeping an eye on oil prices. Oil prices whipsawed Thursday, with West Texas Intermediate falling 1.5% in afternoon trading after rising more than 3% at session highs. The U.S. dollar fell sharply Wednesday, with the dollar index falling more than 1%. The greenback resumed its downward trajectory Thursday, falling about 0.8%.Productivity declined 3% in the fourth quarter, its biggest drop since the first quarter of 2014, the Labor Department said Thursday. Meanwhile, U.S. jobless claims rose 8,000 to 285,000 last week, while economists were expecting a total of 280,000. Despite the increase last week, claims remained below 300,000, a level associated with strong labor market conditions, for the 48th straight week. That is the longest run since the early 1970s. Investors will dissect the January jobs report on Friday. In Europe, stocks traded mildly lower with the pan-European STOXX 600 index holding near the flatline. Asian equities were mixed overnight, with the Shanghai composite gaining 1.5% and the Nikkei 225 dropping 0.85%.The Dow Jones industrial average traded 20 points higher, or 0.1%, at 16,357. The S&P 500 fell 2 points to 1,909, with materials leading five sectors higher and consumer discretionary the biggest laggard. The Nasdaq gained 16 points to 4,489. Gold is seen trading about 1.3% higher, crude oil is seen trading about 1.9% lower, and the U.S. dollar is seen trading about 0.8% lower at about  1:00pm Chicago time.
Wednesday, there were 291 contracts traded, down from 831 contracts traded on Tuesday. Open interest – the number of contracts outstanding – on Wednesday decreased by 181 contracts to 12,859.

Oryza U.S. Rough Rice Recap – Prices Soften As Export Sales Continue Disappoint

Feb 05, 2016

The U.S. cash market was slightly weaker again today as export sales continue to disappoint traders.
The USDA reported that cumulative net export sales for the week that ended on January 28th, totaled 39,000 tons, an increase of 72% from the previous week but 1% lower than the prior 4-week average.
Increases were reported for the following destinations including: 26,500 tons to Japan, 6,500 tons to El Salvador, 1,900 tons to Canada, 1,300 tons to Jordan, and 800 tons to Yemen while reductions of 500 tons were reported for Israel.
U.S. rice exporters shipped 39,700 tons, a decrease of 7% from than last week and 17% lower than the prior 4-week average.
Increases were reported for the following destinations including: 12,100 tons to Japan, 6,800 tons to Haiti, 4,900 tons to South Korea, 4,800 tons to Canada, and 4,000 tons to Mexico.

TPP Poses Threat to U.S. Rough Rice Exports to Mexico, Says RPA President

Feb 04, 2016

The President of the U.S. Rice Producers Association (RPA) has expressed concern over the future of U.S. rough rice exports to Mexico if the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement is successfully completed, according to Delta Farm Press.
He noted that the U.S. had been exporting rough rice to Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and to Colombia under the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) without hassles for a number of years. However, recently, the U.S. is facing the threat of increasing Asian milled rice imports by both the countries.
He notes that the recently negotiated TPP is a "disaster for U.S. rough rice exports." He has expressed concern that if Vietnam obtains duty free status as part of the TPP, the U.S. would lose its lucrative market in Mexico.
Similarly, in Colombia, the official says, the U.S. rough rice was the most preferred one by the local mills some years ago, but the rules on rice diseases in the new FTA has led to a halt in U.S. rough rice exports to the South American nation. Recently, Colombia has been depending on imports from Thailand, he says.
The official noted that the US RPA has many times in the past highlighted these issues to the government. He added that they are planning to again address their concerns with the USDA, USTR, APHIS and members of Congress next week.  


4th February 2016 daily global rice enewsletter by riceplus magazine




USA Rice on the Road in Louisiana 

JENNINGS and ALEXANDRIA, LA -- As growers hustle to complete their off-season meetings this month before the start of the 2016 planting season, USA Rice staff participated in meetings here of the Louisiana Rice Council, the Louisiana Rice Growers Association, and the Central Louisiana Rice Growers Association.
More than 200 growers attended the events, conducted organization business, heard from LSU's Dr. Rogers Leonard about the strong connection between the AgCenter and the rice industry, and listened to reports from USA Rice.
In Jennings, rice farmer and rancher Wayne Zaunbrecher was also honored posthumously for his legacy of contributions to the rice industry.  His wife of 54 years, Linda, and his daughters accepted the award on his behalf.
Mrs. Linda Zaunbrecher accepting award on behalf of her husband, Wayne (photo by Bruce Schultz)
USA Rice President & CEO Betsy Ward opened her remarks by commenting on the state of the rice economy in Louisiana.  "We know it's tough out there and we understand the urgency to develop new markets and expand and protect existing markets for your crop.  It's what we are all working on every day," she said.
Ward went on to share insight and analysis of some key U.S. export markets - China, Colombia, Iraq, and Mexico - where the situation ranges from good to uncertain.
USA Rice Vice President of Government Affairs Ben Mosely shared his thoughts on the important Trans Pacific Partnership agreement remarking, "We are not impressed with what we see and are exploring our options to improve the situation for U.S. rice."
He also talked about opportunities for rice in Cuba, illegal subsidies for rice producers in other countries that further exacerbate U.S. grower difficulties, and the fact that between the presidential election season, the closing months of the Obama Administration, and a relatively light legislative calendar for Congress there is little chance of major policy initiatives moving forward in Washington.
Central LA Rice Growers
President Phillip Lamartiniere
Michael Klein, USA Rice vice president for marketing, communications, and domestic promotion, closed out the program with the how's, why's, and what's of the domestic promotion programs.
He shared strategies in place to raise awareness and encourage the use of U.S.-grown rice, including leveraging U.S. government food policy, engaging with key market influencers, and reaching out to consumers and the foodservice industry. 
He showed several videos, including one that showcased street interviews with random tourists in Washington, DC, for a humorous look at what they do and do not know about rice.  You can watch the four minute video here.
"The interviews were unscientific, but the video does demonstrate that for the most part Americans like and eat rice but they just don't think about where it comes from. Once we told them rice is actually grown here, most of them expressed a preference for U.S. origin rice over rice from other origins," he explained.
Click on photo to watch the video

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Ambassador Froman
TPP Agreement Signed, Rice Concerns Remain 

AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND -- Trade Ministers from 12 nations signed the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) yesterday (Feb. 4 local time).  U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman joined officials from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, and Vietnam at the signing, which launches the formal start of the ratification process in many of the TPP countries.

"Signature is only one step in what looks to be a lengthy process for review of the deal here at home," said USA Rice COO Bob Cummings.  "U.S. law provides a detailed timeline for Congress to consider and approve TPP , and key congressional leaders have said that a vote on the agreement will not occur until after the November 2016 presidential election."

The goal of the TPP is to dramatically reduce or eliminate tariffs and non-tariff barriers on trade between the 12 members.  Because the United States already has free trade agreements with Canada, Mexico and Peru, U.S. rice's focus was expanding access in Japan and maintaining our competitiveness in Mexico.  Both countries rank among the top U.S. export markets for rice.

"The gains achieved in Japan were, unfortunately, less than our modest objectives," according to Michael Rue, a California rice farmer and vice chairman of the USA Rice International Trade Policy Committee.  "We intend to use the time before Congress considers TPP to understand fully the details of our new access and to seek assurances from the administration that we will get what we have been promised."

Mexico agreed to eliminate all duties on rice imported from Vietnam within ten years after the agreement goes into effect.  "This is of great concern because Mexico is our number one export market," said Dow Brantley, an Arkansas producer and chairman of USA Rice.  "As Mexico increases imports of milled rice, Vietnam is our number one competitive threat.  We believe that Vietnam is providing subsidies to its producers in excess of levels allowed by the World Trade Organization, so we face the prospect of unfair competition in a key market.  The subsidy problem isn't confined to Vietnam, and it's time for the U.S. government to challenge unfair subsidies in many key agricultural exporters."  Under the North America Free Trade Agreement, all U.S. rice enters Mexico duty free while rice from Vietnam currently faces a 20 percent duty.

Cummings concluded, "As Congress moves to consider TPP, USA Rice will continue to engage with the administration and Congress to educate, seek assurances, and press for relief from foreign subsidies."
 

The path forward
eb 04, 2016, 09.45 AM | Source: PTI KRBL Q3 net profit down 20% at Rs 65.78 crore The company had clocked a net profit of Rs 82.52 crore in the year-ago period. Net sales of the company declined to Rs 703.84 crore in the October-December quarter of the current fiscal from Rs 764.51 crore in the year-ago period, the company said in a regulatory filing. Basmati rice exporter KRBL   posted a 20 percent fall in its net profit at Rs 65.78 crore for the quarter ended December 2015 due to fall in sales. The company had clocked a net profit of Rs 82.52 crore in the year-ago period. Net sales of the company declined to Rs 703.84 crore in the October-December quarter of the current fiscal from Rs 764.51 crore in the year-ago period, the company said in a regulatory filing. The company sells basmati rice under the brand name 'India Gate' and has a strong presence both in India and the markets abroad. The company has the capacity to process 1.4 million tonnes of paddy per annum. In the last financial year, KRBL's turnover stood at Rs 3,203 crore.

Read more at: 
http://www.moneycontrol.com/news/results/krbl-q3-net-profit-down-20-at-rs-6578-crore_5292121.html?utm_source=ref_article

Rice Prices

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Arrivals in tonnes;prices in Rs/quintal in domestic market.
Arrivals
Price
Current
%
change
Season 
cumulative
Modal
Prev.
Modal
Prev.Yr
%change
Rice
Gondal(UP)
1200.00
1042.86
8947.60
2015
2025
-0.74
Gadarpur(Utr)
790.00
25.6
53018.00
1989
2096
4.41
Mathura(UP)
650.00
103.12
6305.00
2020
2000
-
Etawah(UP)
480.00
6.67
12800.00
2250
2255
2.74
Shahjahanpur(UP)
401.00
7.33
37473.50
2180
2160
8.46
Kanpur(Grain)(UP)
300.00
-6.25
4725.00
2180
2125
3.81
Gorakhpur(UP)
300.00
15.38
2662.00
2125
2120
10.10
Manjeri(Ker)
290.00
NC
4930.00
3000
3000
-9.09
Pilibhit(UP)
280.00
7.69
15038.00
2190
2195
-6.41
Allahabad(UP)
220.00
-8.33
3750.00
2090
2085
2.96
Ballia(UP)
220.00
4.76
4620.00
1955
1950
-1.01
Samsi(WB)
200.00
300
14410.00
2800
2800
-
Sitapur(UP)
161.00
0.62
3558.00
2220
2220
5.26
Bahraich(UP)
160.00
-3.61
1927.50
2075
2080
-0.24
Basti(UP)
142.50
2.52
2656.00
2070
2070
2.73
Asansol(WB)
132.00
1.54
658.00
2450
2450
-
Mathabhanga(WB)
130.00
8.33
2000.00
1950
1950
-
Agra(UP)
108.00
-10
2829.00
2150
2130
4.88
Rampurhat(WB)
100.00
NC
394.00
1760
1750
-
Bareilly(UP)
98.50
-1.5
5399.00
2125
2100
1.19
Lucknow(UP)
98.00
-2
2102.00
2125
2110
-2.07
Achalda(UP)
90.00
28.57
1955.00
2240
2245
-
Kalipur(WB)
90.00
-5.26
2254.00
2150
2150
-
Chandabali(Ori)
85.00
NC
765.00
1800
1800
NC
Kalna(WB)
80.00
-13.98
685.00
1770
1770
-6.84
Sealdah Koley Market(WB)
80.00
1.01
478.40
2400
2400
-4.00
P.O. Uparhali Guwahati(ASM)
79.00
16.18
1700.00
2100
2100
-19.23
Saharanpur(UP)
79.00
-1.25
2862.00
2045
2040
-3.54
Gajol(WB)
75.00
15.38
874.00
2800
2800
-8.20
Mainpuri(UP)
72.50
-2.03
397.00
2000
2000
6.38
Kalahandi(Dharamagarh)(Ori)
71.48
70.92
403.54
2100
2100
-4.55
Lanka(ASM)
70.00
7.69
1380.00
1725
1725
-
Thodupuzha(Ker)
70.00
NC
1050.00
2600
2600
6.12
Gauripur(ASM)
64.00
28
1592.50
4500
4500
-
Beldanga(WB)
64.00
-1.54
719.50
2275
2275
-12.50
Tilhar(UP)
62.50
1983.33
809.00
2160
2165
5.62
Coochbehar(WB)
62.50
4.17
336.50
2050
2050
-5.75
Ghaziabad(UP)
60.00
-25
1240.00
2065
2070
-2.59
Gazipur(UP)
60.00
3.45
805.50
1900
1900
3.26
Siliguri(WB)
55.00
10
342.00
2600
2600
-
Dadri(UP)
50.00
25
1031.00
2060
2080
-2.83
Barasat(WB)
50.00
-28.57
1140.00
2200
2200
-
Nadia(WB)
50.00
NC
850.00
3200
3200
3.23
Muzzafarnagar(UP)
47.00
9.3
550.00
2050
2050
-
Kasimbazar(WB)
45.00
NC
744.00
2290
2300
-11.92
Karimganj(ASM)
40.00
100
960.00
2200
2200
4.76
Partaval(UP)
40.00
100
759.50
2025
2025
3.85
Junagarh(Ori)
38.15
37.48
539.58
2100
2100
-4.55
Purulia(WB)
36.00
20
1086.00
2200
2200
-8.33
North Lakhimpur(ASM)
35.50
303.41
722.80
1900
1900
-
Bindki(UP)
35.00
-27.08
1335.00
2250
2220
8.17
Jorhat(ASM)
30.00
-25
530.00
2700
2800
-
Dhekiajuli(ASM)
30.00
NC
472.50
1900
2100
1.60
Balurghat(WB)
28.00
-3.45
87.00
2820
2825
-
Garbeta(Medinipur)(WB)
28.00
27.27
293.00
2400
2450
0.84
Sambhal(UP)
27.00
42.11
86.00
2200
2200
11.39
Lohardaga(Jha)
26.00
15.56
344.00
1950
1900
12.07
Udala(Ori)
26.00
-3.7
569.00
2700
2700
-
Mirzapur(UP)
25.00
-3.85
702.50
1925
1920
2.94
Rampur(UP)
25.00
56.25
273.50
2190
2195
6.31
Yusufpur(UP)
25.00
25
347.00
1875
1870
0.81
Ghatal(WB)
25.00
-13.79
246.00
1900
1820
-
Haldibari(WB)
25.00
25
411.50
2350
2350
-11.32
Ramkrishanpur(Howrah)(WB)
24.30
-2.41
550.20
2300
2300
-11.54
Palghar(Mah)
24.00
-33.33
402.00
3980
3061
-
Jhargram(WB)
24.00
-
183.00
2700
-
-3.57
Jalpaiguri Sadar(WB)
24.00
-4
484.00
2700
2700
-4.26
Cachar(ASM)
20.00
-33.33
1020.00
2700
2700
NC
Kolhapur(Laxmipuri)(Mah)
20.00
-20
571.00
3000
3000
-
Lakhimpur(UP)
20.00
33.33
300.50
2090
2100
-
Mekhliganj(WB)
18.00
-14.29
242.50
1975
2050
-
Bhawanipatna(Ori)
17.00
-
17.00
2500
-
-
Champadanga(WB)
16.00
77.78
355.00
2400
2400
-
Kolaghat(WB)
16.00
6.67
271.00
2300
2300
-
Atarra(UP)
15.00
25
27.00
2000
2000
-
Falakata(WB)
14.80
0.68
225.30
1950
1950
-
Tamluk (Medinipur E)(WB)
14.00
NC
311.00
2300
2300
-
Bijnaur(UP)
13.00
62.5
263.50
2190
2180
-
Kannauj(UP)
13.00
-3.7
108.60
2185
2180
0.69
Raiganj(WB)
13.00
NC
472.00
2730
2730
-
Dibrugarh(ASM)
12.00
-40
473.80
2400
2400
-
Simdega(Jha)
12.00
50
34.00
2100
2100
NC
Kasganj(UP)
12.00
-50
362.00
1860
1850
-8.15
Muradabad(UP)
12.00
33.33
281.50
2230
2240
12.91
Pukhrayan(UP)
12.00
60
54.50
1980
1980
-0.50
Medinipur(West)(WB)
12.00
-20
302.00
2450
2400
-2.00
Naugarh(UP)
11.50
43.75
307.00
2065
2040
8.68
Firozabad(UP)
11.00
-8.33
264.00
2150
2140
5.91
Pundibari(WB)
10.50
-19.23
57.00
1975
2000
-8.14
Kottayam(Ker)
10.00
NC
60.00
3500
3500
-
Kaliaganj(WB)
10.00
NC
318.00
2650
2650
-
Sheoraphuly(WB)
10.00
-9.09
307.50
2550
2550
-12.82
Hazaribagh(Jha)
9.95
1.53
34.05
3015
2945
-
Deogarh(Ori)
9.00
NC
250.50
2500
2500
NC
Raibareilly(UP)
9.00
-5.26
155.00
2050
2030
1.23
Katwa(WB)
9.00
12.5
43.00
2300
2300
-4.17
Dibiapur(UP)
8.00
NC
16.00
2230
2230
1.83
Chengannur(Ker)
7.00
16.67
302.00
2500
2500
-13.79
Bolangir(Ori)
7.00
7.69
93.00
2200
2200
-8.33
Raath(UP)
6.20
-
6.20
1700
-
17.24
Tusura(Ori)
6.00
9.09
93.50
2200
2200
-15.38
Khairagarh(UP)
6.00
20
196.00
2070
2090
1.97
Silapathar(ASM)
5.90
9.26
436.60
3000
3000
NC
Mohanpur(Tri)
5.00
NC
45.00
2700
2750
-
Rura(UP)
4.50
-19.64
45.10
2190
2190
6.57
Jeypore(Kotpad)(Ori)
4.10
192.86
115.20
4200
3250
29.23
Hailakandi(ASM)
4.00
NC
71.00
2700
2700
NC
Islampur(WB)
4.00
33.33
151.20
2150
2150
-
Kalyani(WB)
3.50
-66.67
60.50
3400
3400
-
Aroor(Ker)
3.00
NC
97.00
7000
6800
-24.73
Alibagh(Mah)
3.00
NC
57.00
3750
3750
134.38
Rahama(Ori)
3.00
25
16.00
2400
2400
-
Perinthalmanna(Ker)
2.90
NC
24.90
2600
2600
-
Farukhabad(UP)
2.50
-28.57
151.00
2200
2200
1.62
Murud(Mah)
2.00
-33.33
42.00
2750
2750
71.88
Siyana(UP)
2.00
-20
43.50
2040
2045
NC
Jeypore(Ori)
1.50
NC
19.90
4100
4100
NC
Bonai(Bonai)(Ori)
1.50
-25
20.10
2000
2000
-16.67
Santir Bazar(Tri)
1.50
-
3.10
2600
-
-1.89
Shillong(Meh)
1.40
16.67
26.70
3500
3500
NC
Punalur(Ker)
1.00
NC
7.00
1600
1600
-
Sardhana(UP)
1.00
-16.67
40.50
2050
2060
NC

Rice breeders rally after weather, market shifts to design better varieties

·         Writer: Kathleen Phillips, 979-845-2872, ka-phillips@tamu.edu
·         Contact: Dr. Ted Wilson, 409-752-2741, lt-wilson@aesrg.tamu.edu
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BEAUMONT — When the weather or the market shifts in a year, farmers feel the impact immediately – be it good or bad.
But for the scientists who spend a lifetime figuring out ways to create new varieties to feed more people, weird weather and market movements are welcomed for the lessons they teach.  
That was the message recently when about 40 rice breeders from four states converged at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Beaumont to compare notes about the most recent growing season and what promising varieties might be emerging from their programs.
“Every time a new variety of rice gets released by a breeder, it has gone through a gauntlet basically of having been grown multiple years in multiple locations to see how well it  performs,” said Dr. Ted Wilson, center director at Beaumont.  “It’s a process of weeding out those varieties that are likely going to have problems somewhere down the road because of grain quality, because the yield is just not quite there, or because disease resistance is not high enough.”
Description: Dr. Ted Wilson, center director, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center- Beaumont. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips)
Dr. Ted Wilson, center director, Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center- Beaumont. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips)
Testing in field conditions for a number of years is important, he said, because weather variations can throw a curve in an otherwise strong contender.
“In 2015 in Texas and Louisiana, for example, it was extremely wet early on, so planting was later,” Wilson noted. “And, since farmers in those two states produce two crops a year —  the main crop and the ratoon crop — the later you plant, the more likely the crop will be flowering in higher heat in late-June, July, August, which can take a toll on yield.”
The wetter than normal 2015 season also led to disease pressures, he said, and yet while the main crop had lower yield, the ratoon crop produced record yields.
“Think of the rice plant having pockets,” Wilson explained. “These pockets are where sugar is stuffed. The sugars turn into starches and make the grain.  If you have fewer grains because the heat hurt the plant, the plant has left over energy in the form of starches and sugars, and it stuffs them into the stems. That high level of what we call nonstructural carbohydrates comes in handy for the second crop, because when the straw — the lower 8 inches of the plant — has high levels of starches, it can just go like gangbusters and make a second crop that is higher yielding than normal.
“We don’t want to see a bad first crop like this year, but when we get a high yielding ratoon crop, it’s a savior,” he said.
It’s that sort of unusual situation breeders consider when they gather each year to report on how well test varieties performed.
“By exchanging information, rice breeders learn similarities and dissimilarities and that  helps explain what and why things went wrong or what and why things went quite well.” Wilson said.
Wilson told the rice scientists at the meeting that the trend among Texas growers is moving more toward planting hybrid varieties, which have only been available for little more than 10 years. Previously, the only type of rice seed was what is called “inbred.”
But Wilson said in 2012, hybrid varieties for the first time accounted for more than 50 percent of the acreage. But the hybrid plantings dropped back in 2015, most likely due to rice market prices being suppressed and the higher cost for hybrid seed.
Hybrids typically yield as much as 18 percent more than inbreds, but there are pluses and minuses for both types, he said.
Description: Rice at Texas A&M AgriLife Research Center near Beaumont in July. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips).
Rice at Texas A&M AgriLife Research Center near Beaumont in July. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo by Kathleen Phillips).
“Inbred seed is cheaper and the grain quality historically is much higher than hybrids,” Wilson noted. “But the use of nitrogen is slightly more for inbreds, so that’s bad, because it is a cost. Disease resistance tends to be slightly higher for hybrids, which is a plus.”
Wilson also told the breeders that a recent study at the Beaumont center showed that for several historic rice varieties when examined under different fertilizer and management regimes, genetics explained 45 percent of the increase in yield over time and management explained 55 percent of the increase.
“If all our rice growers were to get 80 percent of the maximum yield for the main crop and if they planted on time and were able to get a ratoon crop to get 80 percent of the maximum ratoon crop yield, the overall yield in Texas alone with no further improvements in varieties would increase by 63 percent to 13,000 pounds per acre,” Wilson said. “The point is that genetics is important but management is a big part of the ballgame, too.  
“The fact of the matter is that maybe in some situations the genetics is more important and in some situations management is more important,” he added. “What is really important is that both of them are needed to make rice production profitable anywhere in the world.”
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http://today.agrilife.org/2016/02/03/rice-breeders-rally-after-weather-market-shifts-to-design-better-varieties/

Opportunities opening up for rice industry

Last Modified: Thursday, February 04, 2016 9:51 AM
JENNINGS — Global markets are brimming with opportunities for international trade of U.S. rice, an industry official told Southwest Louisiana rice farmers this week.
“We understand the urgency of getting some new markets open and moving some rice for the industry,” USA Rice Federation President Betsy Ward told members of the Louisiana Rice Council and Louisiana Rice Growers Association during a joint meeting Tuesday.
Things continue to look optimistic for the rice industry as officials work to promote U.S. rice in foreign countries and further open international trade, Ward said. More than $5 million is spent annually on rice export promotions and trade policy work for global markets, she said.
Mexico is the largest market for U.S. rice, including paddy rice and long-grain mills, but those exports are facing competition from outside rice markets, Ward said.
“We have seen some penetration from Uruguay and some of the other Asian markets, so we really have to work hard to identify U.S. rice in the marketplace,” Ward said.
The U.S. is investing significant time and resources in Mexico because of the potential growth, she said. Over 300 marketing activities a year are conducted there to promote U.S. rice.
“Most people think Mexicans eat rice all the time,” Ward said. “But they don’t, so there is potential for upside growth because they have a young and growing population who are interested in new cuisines and they can’t possibly produce rice due to water issues and low production in Mexico.”
Exporting rice to Mexico is also easy for the U.S. because there are no tariffs on rice, she said. U.S. rice officials are equally excited about further opening up the rice market in Colombia, which is the third-largest importer of American rice.
Colombia has an emergency need for about 200,000 metric tons of rice due to El Nino effects on their domestic rice production, she said.
“And we want them to buy U.S. rice,” Ward said. “They’re looking at buying some Asian rice and bringing it in. We want to prevent that from happening because that is a good market for us, and if they bring in cheaper rice it could undermine our markets.”
Officials have been working since December to establish a better market in Colombia, she said.
U.S. rice officials are also stepping up efforts to sell more rice to Iraq, which imports about 1.5 million metric tons per year, including some U.S. rice. But problems with inconsistencies in government control and frequent changes in personnel have hindered efforts to open the market to the U.S.
U.S. rice producers could also soon gain access to China, the world’s largest rice market. The market has been tough for U.S. rice, but recent negotiations are expected to soon open the market, Ward said. “We have been working to open up that market for nearly a decade,” she said.
Officials hope to begin exporting U.S. rice to China this year.
“Our mills and exporters are prepared and ready to comply with a very complicated sanitary agreement,” Ward said. “We are going to supply a list of interested exporters to the Chinese government to tell us what ports we can export to.”
U.S. rice officials also want to do more business with Cuba and are waiting for embargoes to be lifted. Many of the officials are scheduled to meet next week in Washington, D.C., to focus on the importance of the Cuban market to U.S. rice, she said
Ben Mosely, USA Rice Federation vice president of government affairs, said officials are working on a lot of issues with Congress and the Obama administration that focus on international trade.
Several bills in Congress seek to remove sanctions and lift embargoes, but politics is slowing the process, Mosely said.
http://www.americanpress.com/20160204-rice-outlook

Commentary: Rough rice exports key to future for U.S. rice farmers?

Feb 3, 2016Dwight Roberts, President and CEO, US Rice Producers Association | Delta Farm Press
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·         What does the future hold for U.S. rice exports?
·         Rough rice exports key for producers?
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The longtime debate on exporting milled versus rough rice continues and appears to be entering a new chapter. Going back to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Mexico, then the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) and more recent agreements like the treaty with Colombia, all tell a story.
As we enter what appears to be a new era in international trade, the U.S. rice farmer must ask himself, “Would I still be in business if there were no rough rice exports?” 
Farmers were told that rough rice exports would cripple our domestic market and erode our infrastructure. Ask anyone in the wheat industry what happened to all those flour mills that used to export bagged flour. They closed and the U.S. became the largest exporter of wheat in the world.
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In today’s market the only real advantage we have is to export our rough rice to foreign mills who beg for a raw material to process. CAFTA negotiations 15 years ago should still be fresh on the minds of farmers as we heard our loyal customers in the market say “we prefer to buy rough rice from the United States but if not then we cannot promise we can import U.S. milled rice while cheaper Asian rice is offered to us every week.” The issue was one of the defining moments in the history of the US Rice Producers Association, which protected the market while being told that rough rice exports would cripple the U.S. rice industry.
Today we are faced with new and renewed pressing issues. We are seeing an increase in the threat of Asian rice being shipped into the two most important markets in the Western Hemisphere: Mexico and Colombia. The United States has free trade agreements with both countries. In Mexico, the recently negotiated Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a disaster for U.S. rice exports. The 20,000 ton addition to the quota for Japan is about as exciting as the 2015 Dallas Cowboys.
But what must get the attention of the long grain farmer is the detrimental effect the TPP will have on our lucrative market in Mexico once Vietnam obtains duty free status, assuming the agreement gets passage in the U.S. Congress. Have you seen Asian prices lately for milled rice, characterized by government intervention policies that distort the marketplace? Excuse me, but this is not a level playing field.
The current conditions in Colombia should be of serious concern to American rice farmers. Prior to the completion of the current U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement, Colombia allowed the importation of U.S. rough rice by their mills in the years when local production was insufficient to meet local demand. In fact, during an El Nino event some 15 years ago, Colombia imported around 200,000 tons of U.S. rough rice with no complications.
Fast forward to the new FTA negotiations and all of the sudden rice smut was considered to be a danger to Colombia and rough rice exports came to a halt. In the meantime, the same disease has been found in Colombia.
This reminds me of what a rice researcher told me a few years ago, “the worst pests for rice are political pests.” The bottom line is that Colombia is very short on domestic production and therefore have been importing above their FTA quota and paying the steep taxes. Without the ability to import U.S. rough rice they are turning their attention, as this article goes to print, towards cheaper Thailand rice.
The US Rice Producers Association has been vocal about these issues and will again address their concerns with the USDA, USTR, APHIS and members of Congress while in Washington, D.C., the week of February 8.
http://deltafarmpress.com/rice/commentary-rough-rice-exports-key-future-us-rice-farmers

TCP scraps rice tender

20160202T000000Z 
Business Recorder
Following the directives of the federal government, the Trading Corporation of Pakistan (TCP) Monday announced that it has cancelled the rice procurement tender. Last week, the state-run graintrader invited fresh sealed bids (under Public Procurement Rules, 2004) from companies/partnership/sole proprietors dealing in exportof rice for purchase of 15,000 tons long grain white rice (IRRI-6) on Cost and Free on Board (C and FoB) basis up to the port of Cotonou, Benin, packed in polypropylene (PP) woven bags as per provided specification.
As per the TCP announcement, the tender was to open on February 3, 2016, however, the state-run graintraderMonday cancelled the tender without quoting any reason. Sources said the tender has been cancelled on the directives of the ministry of commerce.
The fresh tender for procurement of 15,000 tons IRRI-6 was issued on January 26, when first rice tender was scrapped as the quoted prices were significantly higher than the prevailing local prices. The procurement was being made for Benin as gift from the people of Pakistan. Presently, several African countries are facing food shortage and two weeks ago Pakistan dispatched a consignment of 15,000 tons rice (10,000 tons IRRI-6 and 5,000 tons Basmati) to Cuba.

http://www.world-grain.com/news/news%20home/LexisNexisArticle.aspx?articleid=2527756232 FAO Food Price Index starts 2016 dropping to nearly 7-year low

Feb 04, 2016
ROME, Italy - The FAO Food Price Index fell in January, slipping 1.9 percent below its level in the last month of 2015, as prices of all the commodities it tracks fell, sugar in particular.
The Food Price Index averaged 150.4 points in January, down 16 percent from a year earlier and registering its lowest level since April 2009.
The FAO Food Price Index is a trade-weighted index tracking international market prices for five key commodity groups: major cereals, vegetable oils, dairy, meat and sugar.
The main factors underlying the lingering decline in basic food commodity prices are the generally ample agricultural supply conditions, a slowing global economy, and the strengthening of the US dollar.
This month, FAO also raised its forecast for worldwide cereal stocks in 2016, as a result of lowering its projected consumption and raising 2015 production prospects.
The FAO Sugar Price Index fell 4.1 percent from December, its first drop in four months, as crop conditions improved in Brazil, by far the world's leading sugar producer and exporter.
The Dairy Price Index dropped by 3.0 percent on the back of large supplies, in both the EU and New Zealand, and torpid world import demand.
The FAO Cereal Price Index declined 1.7 percent (to 149.1 points) amid ample global supplies and increased competition for export markets, especially for wheat and maize, as well as a strong US dollar.
The Vegetable Oil Price Index dropped 1.7 percent, mainly because of a decline in soy oil prices reflecting expectations of ample global soybean supplies.
The Meat Price Index moved 1.1 percent lower than its revised December value, with prices of all meat categories falling, except pigmeat, which was sustained by the opening of private storage aid in the EU.
Mixed early prospects for 2016 harvests
Weather patterns associated with El NiƱo are sending mixed signals about the early prospects for cereal crops in 2016, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, according to FAO's Cereal Supply and Demand Brief, also released today.
2016 crop prospects have been "severely weakened" in Southern Africa, and a 25 percent cut in wheat production in South Africa now appears likely. Conditions for the crop are generally favourable in the Russian Federation and the European Union, but winter plantings declined in the United States and Ukraine. The area under wheat is also expected to be cut in India, following a poor monsoon and below average rains since October.
The 2016 outlook for rice along and south of the Equator is "dim" due, at times, to insufficient water and, at others, to excessive rains. Description: FAO Food Price Index starts 2016 dropping to nearly 7-year low
As for the 2015 season, FAO modestly raised its forecast for world cereal production to 2 531 million tonnes, up slightly from that released in December.
Wheat output in Canada and Russia and maize output in China, Canada and Paraguay drove the upward revision. FAO also slightly raised its expectation regarding 2015 world rice production, mostly on account of higher forecasts for China, Viet Nam and the United States.
At the same time, FAO lowered its forecast for world cereal utilization in the 2015/16 season to 2 527 million tonnes, which remains 0.8 percent above that of the previous year.This reflects a 2.0 percent increase for wheat, largely on account of higher livestock feed use in developed countries and a 0.3 percent increase in maize. World rice utilization is projected to expand by 1.1 percent, keeping world per-capita consumption stable.
As a result of the upgraded production and downgraded consumption forecasts, world cereal stocks are set to end the 2016 seasons at 642 million tonnes, higher than they began. That level implies a steady and comfortable global cereal stock-to-use ratio of around 25 percent.
However, the inventory build-up varies geographically and depending on the crop. Notable increases in wheat inventories are forecast for the United States, European Union and China whereas some reductions are likely in Canada, India and the Islamic Republic of Iran. On the other hand, world rice stocks would need to be drawn down to bridge the expected gap between world production and consumption, with much of the release likely to concern India and Thailand, the two leading rice exporters


http://www.eturbonews.com/68259/fao-food-price-index-starts-2016-dropping-nearly-7-year-low